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Got all I can from the internet....

Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 26 Sep 2012 12:43PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 26 Sep 2012 1:00PM GMT
Surnames: Vredenburgh
I'm researching the Vredenburgh family from Manhattan in the early 1800's and have gotten a ton of information from the databases on ancestry.com. I have used Ancestry's new search, the old search (which proved invaluable), used both soundex and my own list of various misspellings in order to locate most census and other records. All-in-all I have 100+ hours of searching time invested...but so far so good.

But now I am completely stuck because I can't find the parents of ANY of my Vredenburghs born around 1810-1820. The census records from that time don't include family member names...ARG.

Through the internet, I've been able to locate the death records for most of people I'm interested in. Unfortunately, not a single one of those records says who their parents were!!!

Although I am new at this, it seems that baptism or marriage records are a good, if not the best, source of information about parents in the pre-1840 era. Is this correct? Is there a better source?

Finally, how do I go about locating baptism or marriage records from 1780-1850 for people in various wards in NYC? I have read that it would be the church that has them. The Vredenburgh's were Dutch, so I am guessing they probably were members of the Dutch Reformed Church, but who knows? And where are those church records now? Do I need to physically make a trip to NYC to find these? Should I try legal/probate records (no idea how to get these)?

I feel like I have really slammed into the brick wall...any and all suggestions on how to proceed are welcome.

The main people I am stuck on are:

* Alonzo Vredenburgh (b. 1811, d. 1889)
* Samuel Vredenburgh (b. 1806, d. 1889)
* John J. Vredenburgh (b. 1813, d. 1864)
* Mary Vredenburgh (nee ???) (b. 1788, d. 1879)
* Sarah A. Gaul (nee Vredenburgh) (b. 1825, d. 1905)
* Harriet Vredenburgh (nee ???) (b. abt 1821, d. after 1880)

Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 26 Sep 2012 2:19PM GMT
Classification: Query
Have you checked the library catalog on familysearch.org?

Look at the films/fiche available for NYC. You can order the best possibilities on-line (for a nominal fee) and have sent to your local FHC.



Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 26 Sep 2012 9:20PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks for your help. By the Family Search catalog do you mean this?

https://www.familysearch.org/#form=catalog

If so, then no, I had not. Thanks for the tip. Doing a quick search revealeded five family history books which mention Vredenburghs. Is this what you meant?

I see that for $5 I can have some of these sent to a "Family History Center" which is 45m from my house. Exactly what are these FHC facilities...on Google streets it looks like a church?

Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 27 Sep 2012 1:39AM GMT
Classification: Query
I think dklart means to search in the catalog for the areas of NY that you need records for, then order those films to be delivered to your local Family History Center. You can usually find vital records, church records, etc. for many areas.

Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 27 Sep 2012 3:34AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi LHSwisher, you're reading my mind!

Here's the path from the familysearch.org homepage I take, old habits die hard.

Take a bit of time to read about where and how to use the resources available from the LDS.

You can find the closest Family History Center to you on the site. You can order the film on-line to be sent to that center. You might want to visit your closest center in advance and check out what they already have on hand.
Attachments:

Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 27 Sep 2012 4:37AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 27 Sep 2012 4:37AM GMT
OK...thanks again to everyone for their input. I totally missed the link to the old catalog search! I am blown away by the amount of items in there for early 1800s in New York City. Its incredibly exciting for me.

There are dozens of items in there that sound extremely relevant:

https://familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainfra...

I've been researching on Ancestry.com for the past 2 years and assumed that if it was microfilmed, they already had the database. In other words, I had the impression that there was ancestry.com or just paper. Truly, I did not know what I did not know.

If you kind folks here don't mind, I have a few follow-on questions before I dive into all this:

1) It's hard to create microfiche from paper records, but its easy to create digital pictures (not records, just pictures) from microfiche. Are you all telling me that I actually have to go read the microfiche at my local FHC? Am I wrong, or is that going to take 100s of hours?

2) What if some of these have already been digitized somewhere else, how would I know? What if they have already been converted into records? The volume of information here is frankly overwhelming (and I am a computer-guy!) and I just want to be as efficient as I can be.

3) What about paper records that haven't been put onto microfiche yet. Is there a family history "TO DO" list somewhere that I can see? Seeing all this stuff makes me wonder what else I am missing.

4) Some of these catalog items are just a few rolls of 35mm film. It should cost about $125 to digitize the catalog entry. Will they let me do that? I'll give the electronic version back to them for free...

Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 27 Sep 2012 3:49PM GMT
Classification: Query
1) >> Are you all telling me that I actually have to go read the microfiche at my local FHC? <<

Yes

>>Am I wrong, or is that going to take 100s of hours?<<

Welcome to the world of genealogy. This is historical research, if you enjoy reading, learning and studying, you've found the right hobby. You're not ready to dive yet, spend time in the wading pool.


2) >>What if some of these have already been digitized somewhere else, how would I know?<<

Check the *Records* section on the site. New data is being uploaded as it is being digitized and indexed.

>>The volume of information here is frankly overwhelming (and I am a computer-guy!)<<

This indicates your research skills need some bumping up. Give the dead relatives a rest and spend some time familiarizing yourself (reading and learning) with the resources and how to evaluate data in them. A good "how-to" genealogy book covers this territory. You can also find how-to info and videos on the net. Let google be your friend.

3)>> What about paper records that haven't been put onto microfiche yet.<<

95%+ of historical research data is not on-line. What you find on Ancestry.com is probably less than 1%, ditto familysearch.org. Again, a "how-to" genealogy book seems in order.

>> Is there a family history "TO DO" list somewhere that I can see?<<

Yes, every library and archive in the world has one. Every State, every country has it's own criteria of what is digitized and archived. Money and privacy concerns are two factors that determine how data is treated. Devoting funds to preserve the past is not high on many lists.

>>Seeing all this stuff makes me wonder what else I am missing.<<

Again, a "how-to" genealogy book.

4) >> Some of these catalog items are just a few rolls of 35mm film. It should cost about $125 to digitize the catalog entry. Will they let me do that? I'll give the electronic version back to them for free...<<

No, you can't remove the film/fiche from the FHC.


I suggest you find the closest FHC to you (this is on the familysearch.org site) and pay a visit. Some are better equipped than others. They are run by LDS volunteers in most cases, and the degree of their knowledge depends on the individual. Some FHC have an existing and permanent cache of film, ie; film ordered by another researcher for permanent loan from SLC. You might find some fit your needs and don't need to order another copy.

Your local library can have a tremendous amount of resource as well. Pay them a visit and ask the librarian if they offer gene classes. Ask them to walk you though how to do an inter-library loan. Yup, libraries loan books to one another. Contact your local historical/genealogy society, many have active chapters and members that can assist you in learning the gene ropes.

Unfortunately, Ancestry's "you just have to start looking" is a sneaky and mostly false claim. This is not a quick and easy pursuit. If you enjoy reading, learning and studying, this is the hobby for you.



Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 27 Sep 2012 4:59PM GMT
Classification: Query
OK - Major wake up call here!

I really appreciate the advice and will get some genealogy books. I see that a book called "The Source" seems like a well reviewed book and maybe I'll start there.

I am good with this being a marathon and not a sprint, I guess I just didn't know how far we have to go yet with digitization of the worlds papers records.

Thanks.

Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 27 Sep 2012 6:54PM GMT
Classification: Query
I, too, have ancestors from this church, here is a link to their site, I'm sure if you would email them, they would be able to help you.

http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/albany/drc.html


Kelly McGee-Allen

Re: Got all I can from the internet....

Posted: 28 Sep 2012 1:43AM GMT
Classification: Query
That's a nice site they are putting together, but it seems as though it is all about Albany. At least in my case, the most north I think my family got was Peekskill.

Or are you saying that the Dutch Reformed Church in Albany is holding the records for the NYC Churches that closed down?
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