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Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 28 Aug 2001 11:26PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 6 Jul 2003 11:21PM GMT
I have heard from more than one source that two of my GGGGFather Felix Wilburn's sons were hanged in Nacogdoches Co. One source says it was definitely NOT Felix Jr. That would leave Wm. Elijah (b. 1826), J.H. (b. 1829), L.T., (b. 1832), and Joseph B. (b. 1838). That would make the time of the hangings, within reason, anywhere from 18 years after Elijah's birth on into the 20th century, about 1844 to 1900, at the outside. Elijah is buried in Mahl Cem. I do not know about the others. Can anyone think of where I might find more about these hangings. What newspapers were around then, and what/who would be my best resource in Nacogdoches? I can travel there for a day or two, but I would like to know everything possible when I go. The Wilburns had relatives in Shelby Co., also. Would newspaper accounts be my best source? Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Helen Dearing
GGGGGDaughter of Felix G. Wilburn

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 21 Aug 2007 12:12AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Wilburn
Helen,
Did you ever find out about the Wilburn Brothers the reason they were hanged? If not please reply back to me at ke5cvy@consolidated.net I may have the answer.
Leroy Mooney

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 21 Aug 2007 2:53PM GMT
Classification: Query
You may be interested in the information listed regarding the WILBURN hangings at the following link.

This website lists what appears to be transcriptions from newspapers, with information of the WILBURN hangings transcribed from Nacogdoches Chronicle. Scroll down to year, 1861, then look for sentence beginning with "Lynching and Murder in Texas..."

Here's the link:
http://members.aol.com/wdwylie/1860-1869.txt









Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 21 Aug 2007 3:13PM GMT
Classification: Query
Additional Source: University of Texas, Tyler website also has the same information regarding the WILBURN hangings.

Here's the link:
http://www.uttyler.edu/vbetts/des_arc_constitutional_union.h...

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 28 Feb 2008 3:50AM GMT
Classification: Query
My Grandfather's mother was Lydia (Wilburn) Risinger daughter of William E. and Penny Wilburn. I had herd for many years that the Wilburn family had killed someone. I heard that someone rode their horse onto the front porch of their home and they stoned that person to death. I wonder if the story that was in the Nacogdoches newspaper had anything to do whith the one I had heard?

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 12 Mar 2014 2:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Wilburn
Clint, please reply back if you want to here the story of the Wilburns, they killed my gggrandfather in Harden Co. in 1861
Leroy Mooney

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 5:16PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Wilburn
My email is clj_stein@hotmail.com. I was told that the Wilburns were mean. My grandfather told me that they killed someone by throwing rocks at him.

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 5:37PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Wilburn, Mooney
The story of the Wilburn brothers hanging, the way I heard it was. My gggrandfather was a gunsmith in the 1860’s (Barton Mooney). He did some work on some guns that belonged to the Wilburns. When the 2 sons came back to pick the guns up my gggrandfather wouldn’t let them have the guns. (Apparently he had done some work for them before and he had difficulty collecting his money from them) When he came back it was the old man and his 2 sons and demanded for his guns. My gggrandfather stood his ground and wouldn’t let him have the guns. So they killed him. The sheriff arrested the old man and his sons. Later after the sheriff had placed the three men under the custody of a guard, there were some people that took them from the custody of the guard and hanged the father and his 2 sons. Later that week one of his other sons came looking for them, and a man told him what happen and if he didn’t leave the same would happen to him.

This happen approx. on Oct 25,1860 in Concord, Hardin Co. TX. It was told to me to be printed in the Texas Christian Advocate in Nov 22, 1860, Vol. II, No. 16. But I can’t find anything about this story. My gggrandfather was named Barton Mooney his son Robert was born Apr 3, 1863, my gggrandmother was 3 months pregnant when this happen, so it must of happen in Oct 26, 1863. There wasn’t a town named Concord in Hardin Co. There was a town name Concord in Anglelina Co. but no record of him being buried in the old Concord cemetery. I have found some information that he lived in Melrose, a small town just north of where I live in Etoile TX in Nacogdoches Co. and other information of a person name John Mooney that died in Melrose in approx. 1865. If the Wilburn killed Barton it would have been in Melrose. I’m going to check the cemetery in Melrose and see if I can find Barton’s grave and see if I can find any Wilburn in the cemetery as well.

This is all I have on the Wilburn brother’s hanging in this area. I hope this is the information you’re looking for on the brothers.

This is what I found from the papers of the time that was posted on the internet....

Lynching and Murder in Texas. - The Nacogdoches chronicle has an account of a horrible affair in Hardin county, Texas. There were two family’s by the names of Mooney and Wilburn, respectively, in Nacogdoches county, between which there was a most bitter feud. A short time since the Mooney’s moved to Concord, Hardin county. A few days ago Wilburn, with his three sons, heavily armed, went down to Concord. Finding Mooney in a store, they shot him, wounding him badly.
Mooney then fled to his house. The Wilburns followed him, and found him lying on the floor, weltering in his blood, his head supported by his little daughter. Here they again shot him several times, and beat his lifeless body with their pistols and clubs, and the poor wife pleading for mercy at the assassin's hands, was stricken down and most shamefully abused. The citizens, being by this time aroused, surrounded the Wilburns, and after a conflict in which parties on both sides were wounded, they took them prisoners and placed them under a strong guard for the night. In the morning the four were found hanging each on a separate tree, some distance from town.

[DES ARC, ARK.] THE CONSTITUTIONAL UNION, January 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 4
Lynching and Murder in Texas.—The Nacogdoches [sic] chronicle has an account of a horrible affair in Hardin county, Texas. There were two family’s [sic] by the names of Mooney and Wilburn, respectively, in Nacogdoches county, between which there was a most bitter feud. A short time since the Mooney’s moved to Concord, Hardin county. A few days ago Wilburn, with his three sons, heavily armed, went down to Concord. Finding Mooney in a store, they shot him, wounding him badly.
Mooney then fled to his house. The Wilburns followed him, and found him lying on the floor, weltering in his blood, his head supported by his little daughter. Here they again shot him several times, and beat his lifeless body with their pistols and clubs, and the poor wife pleading for mercy at the assassin's hands, was stricken down and most shamefully abused. The citizens, being by this time aroused, surrounded the Wilburns, and after a conflict in which parties on both sides were wounded, they took them prisoners and placed them under a strong guard for the night. In the morning the four were found hanging each on a separate tree, some distance from town.

Contact me at anytime on this Leroy Mooney Jr

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 12 Jul 2014 5:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
(1)
TEXAS ITEMS.
The Beaumont Banner says that a horrible murder was perpetrated at Concord, Hardin county, on the 5th inst. A man named Mooney, said to bear a good character and generally liked, was assaulted and killed by a man named Wilburn and his three sons. The murderers were arrested and placed in confinement, but on the following morning they were found hanging from four trees, on Boggy Bayou, about a mile from Concord. "It was the opinion," says a correspondent of the Banner "that they met their just reward."

Source: Dallas Herald, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, Wednesday, November 28, 1860; Pg. 2, Column 4

(2)
Cold Blooded Murder.
By persons who have recently arrived from below, we learn of a most terrible affair which occurred at the village of Concord, in Hardin county, on or about the 6th inst. As we gather the circumstances they are about these: Lately two families, one by the name of Mooney, and one by the name of Wilburn, lived in the southern part of this county, and for some time past a most bitter feud has existed between them. A short time since Mooney moved himself and family from this county to Concord; and about the first of this month, John M. Wilburn, the father, and two of his sons, left this county for the same place, where it appears a third son then was. What their apparent object was in going there, we do not know, but they seemed to have been well equpped for any emergency. And immediately upon arriving at Concord and finding Mooney, ....................

(a piece of the page in this column of newspaper is torn out and missing; appearing to be three sentences torn out and missing.)

.......................also wounded in one of his hands. Mooney then fled to his house, whither he was followed by the Wilburn's, who found him lying on the floor, weltering in blood, and his head supported by his little daughter. Here they again shot him several times, and beat the now lifeless body with their pistols or with clubs, and the poor wife, pleading for mercy at the assassins' hands for her dying husband was stricken down and most shamefully abused.

By this time the citizens of the town were aroused, and being determined that such outrages should not go unpunished, demanded the immediate surrender of the Wilburns, and they defying arrest, with the most terrible oaths swore that they would not be taken, and placed the whole town at defiance. They were, however, arrested; but in doing so, the old man Wilburn was seriously wounded, and some of the citizens slightly. The prisoners were then placed under strong guard for the night, but when morning came, they had disappeared, and when found, John M. Wilburn and his three sons were suspended, dead, each to a separate tree, some distance from the town.

Barton Mooney was the name of the murdered man.
-Nacogdoches Chronicle.

Source: The Colorado Citizen, Columbus, Texas, Saturday, December 8, 1860; Pg. 1, Column 5

(3)
Murder and Lynching.
A letter dated Concord, Hardin County, Nov. 6th, and signed by F.B. Powers, says:

Yesterday was enacted in our little town, one of the most brutal, cold-blooded and premediated murders that ever disgraced the annals of history. The parties were from Nacogdoches county, and the deceased, Bart. Mooney, had been residing here a few weeks. He was a hard-working, honest, industrious man, and had a large family depending entirely upon the fruits of his labor for a support.

It appears that the deceased had a quarrel with parties in Nacogdoches, named Wilburn, a father and his three sons. It originated in the refusal of Wilburn to pay the deceased for some services he had rendered. Wilburn and his party swore vengeance against Mooney, and he was compelled to have warrants issued against the Wilburns in order to get safely out of the county.

Since then, and until yesterday, Mooney was employed by various parties in Concord. He bore a good character, and was well liked by his employers.

Three days before the murder, Wilburn and his sons were seen prowling around the neighborhood. On Sunday they were seen on Pine Island Bayou. Yesterday, Monday, the whole party, Wilburn and his three sons, drove into town with an ox-wagon, and after purchasing a bill of groceries of Hamilton&Co., deliberately crossed over on the other side of the street, to where Mooney lived, and then commenced the affray. They dragged him out of his house, and into the street, and after shooting him several times, they jumped on him, then beat him with clubs. At this juncture one or two spectators interfered, and Mooney managed to escape into the house. The Wilburn party now re-loaded their arms, and followed Mooney, who was by this time laying dead on the floor. They were met at the door by Mrs. Mooney, who tried to prevent their entrance, but she was brutally assaulted and trampled under foot. They then entered the house and shot several times at the lifeless corpse. At this time the alarm having been given, the murderers bid defiance to the town, and shot several times at one or two citizens. They then started to make their escape. They were followed by about a dozen citizens, and it was only after the father was riddled with bullets that they were compelled to surrender. They were put under a strong guard yesterday evening. This morning we held an inquest on the bodies of four men, who were found hanging to four trees, on Boggy Bayou, about one mile from Concord. The jury returned a verdict of "death by strangulation."

Source: The Civilian and Gazette Weekly, Galveston, Texas, Tuesday Morning, November 20, 1860; Pg. 2, Column 5

Re: Wilburn Brothers Hanged?

Posted: 12 Jul 2014 6:22PM GMT
Classification: Query
Re: Concord Village, Hardin County Texas, now known as Loeb, Texas

LOEB, TEXAS. Loeb is on U.S. Highway 69/96/287 in extreme southern Hardin County, just north of Pine Island Bayou, which separates Hardin and Jefferson counties. It is on the site of one of the earliest towns in Hardin County, known as Concord during the nineteenth century. A post office was established there as early as 1858. Concord was an important landing on Pine Island Bayou and had been an assembly point for trade to the Big Thicket during the heyday of Southeast Texas steamboating. At that time the town had several saloons and mercantile establishments. In the 1870s Concord's importance diminished, and its post office was closed in 1877. With the construction of railroads through the area in the 1880s, Concord lost its position as a shipping center for Hardin County, even though it was on the Texas and New Orleans Railroad. The community's declining economy received a boost when Henry Loeb erected his Diana Brick and Tile Company there during the early 1900s. The town was renamed Loeb, and a post office by that name was open from 1903 to 1908. Although Loeb was a flag stop on the Gulf, Beaumont and Kansas City Railway, it never became as economically important as Concord had been. Its population was estimated at twenty in the early 1940s and in the early 1990s was counted with that of nearby Lumberton, a growing suburb of Beaumont.

Source: Handbook of Texas, published by the Texas State Historical Association, by Robert Wooster, taken from article by Mary Lou Proctor, A History of Hardin County (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1950).
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