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Joseph BURCH

Joseph BURCH

Jacob L. Bateman III (View posts)
Posted: 15 Dec 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: BURCH
I am searching for informaiton on Joseph BURCH, who settled at China Hill, and was killed by Creek Indians in the Spring of 1818. His son Alfred BURCH is my grandmother Hardwick's ggrandfather. Her grandmother was Martha ELizabeth BURCH, Alfred's daughter.
Alfred was born 1811 in Montgomery County Georgia. He died in Laurens County in 1894. If there is anybody that is doing research on Joseph BURCH, please contact me LBate18945@aol.com or write me Jacob L. Bateman III 3860 Strathmore Drive Montgomery Alabama 36116-4614.

Joseph BURCH

Kevin J. Cheek (View posts)
Posted: 16 Dec 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: BURCH, CAWTHORN, WILLCOX, WRIGHT
Joseph BURCH, Telfair County, Georgia

Joseph Burch died on the night of Tuesday, March 3, 1818, on the west side of the Ocmulgee River, maybe near Osewichee Springs. The attack triggered a series of events that eventually led to a debate in Congress.

Prior to the attack on Joseph and Littleton Burch, there had been troubles with the Seminoles, and Andrew Jackson was dispatched to Florida, along with a number of Georgia Militia units. While Jackson was marching to Florida, a group of Indians struck on the west side of the Ocmulgee, burning houses and driving away cattle. Unaware of this, the Burches were building a house on the west side of the Ocmulgee.

The two Burches were shot as they sat by their camp fire. One legend holds that Littleton remarked only a short time earlier about being nervous, but Joseph felt that Indians would not attack at night. Joseph died instantly; Littleton lived and feigned death. Both were scalped. After the Indians left, Littleton managed to cross the Ocmulgee, and on Friday, March 6, arrived at the home of John Willcox.

The local militia unit was mustered at Fort Adams, and a group of 34 men under the command of Major Cawthorn crossed the Ocmulgee on Sunday, March 8, 1818 in pursuit of the Indians. They followed the signs of cattle, found the Indians, and attacked the morning of Monday, March 9, 1818. Referred to as the Battle of Breakfast Branch (named because the Indians were attacked near a creek at breakfast), there turned out to be twice as many Indians as militiamen, and after nearly an hour the attack turned into a route. Seven militiamen died in the battle, three were wounded. Four Indians are thought to have been killed in the battle.

Panic swept the area, and Major Cawthorn hastily penned a letter to Governor Rabun asking for assistance. Militia from Laurens county was dispatched to the area, and Rabun sent a request to Jackson that some of the militiamen under his command be released and sent to the Ocmulgee. Jackson refused, and Rabun ordered Captain Obed Wright to lead a reprisal raid on the Chehaw towns of Phillemmee and Hopaunee near the Flint river.

However, on the way to the Flint, Wright received information that the raiding party came from the Chehaw town of Au-muc-cu-lee. Over protests from Captain Bothwell of Ft. Early that Au-muc-cu-lee had previously aided Andrew Jackson and that the information had to be wrong, Wright obtained additional men at the fort and set out for the town. As they approached, they found cattle identified as belonging to settlers along the Ocmulgee, as well as a Chehaw resident carrying a gun belonging to one of the militiamen killed at Breakfast Branch. Suspicions confirmed, they attacked the town.

The attack turned into a massacre as the Chehaw took refuge in one cabin, and it was set afire. Most of the Chehaw escaped, but about fifty died, including women and children. Fighting continued after the old chief raised a flag of truce.

The news of the attack on Au-mul-cu-lee scandalized the nation. Andrew Jackson reacted in anger, and demanded that Governor Rabun arrest Wright. Rabun refused, and Jackson himself had Wright arrested. Wright was released by a Justice of the Peace, was later arrested, and, with assistance from friends, escaped to Cuba.

The whole issue became an early States' Rights argument. Jackson maintained that a Governor had no right to issue orders to the militia while a Federal officer was in the field, and in a series of heated letters with Rabun, called Telfair county residents " . . . a few frontiers settlers . . . who had not understanding enough to penetrate the designs of my operations." Rabun fired back that Jackson's own actions at St. Augustine were on par with Wright's at Chehaw, and that Jackson was more interested in his career than in protecting Georgians. Before it was all over, the incident wound up being debated in the U.S. Congress.

More information can be found in Fussell Chalker's "Pioneer Days Along the Ocmulgee."

Hope this helps.

Littleton Burch

Dwight Currie (View posts)
Posted: 28 Dec 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Burch
In "History of Laurens County" printed in 1941, there is a copy of a letter from General Eli Warren to Governor William Schley, from the headquarters of the 39th Georgia Militia, dated Feb. 6, 1836. The letter lists the names of 58 volunteers, "For the protection of the south western frontier of Georgia, and the people of the territory of Florida, against the invasion of hostile indians"

Littleton B. Burch is listed as a private in the militia.

Joseph Burch...wrong date given

Dwight Currie (View posts)
Posted: 28 Dec 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Burch
Sorry, I quoted the date of Joseph Burch as Mar. 13, 1818, but the correct date is March 3, 1818.

My Father's Mother was the daughter of Alfred L. Burch, Born Sept. 9, 1841, died Aug 1, 1907, and Nancy E. Burch, Born March 30, 1844, Died, Jan. 30, 1933...I believe Alfred L. was the son Littleton Burch who survived the attack, only losing his hair.

Joseph Burch

Dwight Currie (View posts)
Posted: 28 Dec 1998 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Burch
According to "History of Telfair County" Joseph Burch and his son(listed as Littleton in "Memoirs of Georgia", but listed as Hugh in "History of Telfair County") were at work building a house on the west side of the river, near where Bowen's Mill is now located, on March 13, 1818, when a party of hostile indians fired upon them, killing the father ans severely wounding the son.. Thinking young Burch dead, they scalped him: but he revived, and two days later he was able to reach the home of John Wilcox, near temperance, Telfair County. Here he was cared for by Mr. Wilcox, and family until he was able to return home.

This shooting of Burch and his son was cause for the subsequent fight between the citizens and the indians on March 9...Accounts of the battle state that about 36 citizens took on a band of 50, or 60 indians. in the ensuing fight, one indian was badly wounded, and four were "surely" killed. Among the citizens, Mitchell Griffin, state Senator from Telfair County was among the dead, and Mark Wilcox was severely wounded

Joseph Burch II

Jacob L. Bateman III (View posts)
Posted: 25 Jan 1999 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: BURCH
I am also looking for information on Joseph BURCH II, who was born in Duplin County North Carolina possibly 1750 and died 3/mar./1818 in Telfair County. If this is your family please contact me LBate18495@ aol.com. I am interested in obtaining the names in order o f Joseph BURCH II's children am descended from Alfred Littleberry BURCH(1811-1894) or write me Jacob L. Bateman III 3870 Strathmore Drive Montgomery Alabama 36116-4614.
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