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Royal bloodlines

Royal bloodlines

Posted: 5 Sep 2005 10:59PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have found out that I am the 22nd descendant of King Edward II of England as well as a long list of other royalty on my grandmother's side. Also a descendant of King James I of England (of the Bible) on my grandfather's side. Does anyone know how I can persue this furthur and how to find more information. And if my place in the line of descendants is of any importance or just wishful thinking on my part!

Re: Royal bloodlines

Yvonne (View posts)
Posted: 6 Sep 2005 5:03PM GMT
Classification: Query
-- Previous Message --
>I have found out that I am the 22nd descendant of King Edward II of England as well as a long list of other royalty on my grandmother's side. Also a descendant of King James I of England (of the Bible) on my grandfather's side. Does anyone know how I can persue this furthur and how to find more information. And if my place in the line of descendants is of any importance or just wishful thinking on my part!

It is said that a very large portion of the English-speaking population of present-day Great Britain and North America can claim a descent from a medieval king of England (such as King Edward II or his son Edward III). This does not make you special, nor does it make you ordinary; it just means you are part of the norm. In other words, most of the population of England is descended from King Edward III, and it would be much more impressive if you could prove you weren't descended from any British King.

If you are a descendant of King James I, you can look for your self in genealogical reference works, because his descendants are very well documented. Print sources include the following (in decreasing order of importance):

*The Royal House of Stuart: The descendants of King James VI of Scotland James I of England*, by A.C. Addington, 3 vols., London: Charles Skilton Ltd, 1969-1976 (This source traces the male-line and female-line descendants of King James VI/I up to the time of publication.)

*Burke's Guide to the Royal Family*, London: Burke's Peerage Ltd, 1973 (This source traces the male-line descendants, and a fair portion of female-line descendants, of King James VI/I up to the time of publication.)

*Le Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et Irlande du Nord*, 3 vols., 1989-1990 (Very similar to the preceding source.)

Online sources include:

Paul Theroff's Royal Genealogy Site (aka: The Theroff Files) at http://pages.prodigy.net/ptheroff/ Scroll down to where it says "The Descendants of King James I & VI" and follow the instructions.

About your "wishful thinking", if you want to know for certain if your line of descent is of any importance, find reliable genealogical reference works (especially ones that cite their sources and back up their claims)*; read the postings in Usenet newsgroups such as soc.genealogy.medieval and alt.talk.royalty; and steer clear of anecdotal (which can be defined as "based on casual observations or indications rather than rigorous or scientific analysis") information, whether you find it in print or on the Internet.

* One such work that you can rely on is *The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States*, by Gary Boyd Roberts, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004.

Finally, continue to research your family tree, but do it logically, methodically, and without bias. Remember: you are not only descended from one individual (be he or she a royal or titled person). There is so much more to you than one single connection. Recognize that thousands of people (your ancestors) had to come before you genealogically before you could be here today :-)

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 8 May 2008 6:32AM GMT
Classification: Query

That response was informative, yet unnecessarily rude.

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 8 May 2008 6:32AM GMT
Classification: Query

That response was informative, yet unnecessarily rude.

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 13 Jun 2008 12:11PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: boubon, capet, hoover, hocker, matter, miller, matchette
It can be done. All you have to do is start from your family where they are from. Then start from the ancestor and work inward towards your family. Then go to the state libraries, churches, wherever they hold the census, birth/death records, marriage/divorce records. You can start with births and deaths. All this then can be peiced together. It takes a lot of time. My family did it and we have it all the way into Euro Royals. I don't know how they managed to do so well but they completed it.

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 24 Jun 2008 2:50PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Breheny, Briwere, Brewers, Baose, Brusters, Brewsters
CJRobson59, sadly no accredited and certified historians, genealogist nor archaeologists truely believe that anyone of any true royal bloodline could exist and have descendants in this modern age other than the current Royal Monarchy of Queen Elizabeth II.

Welcome to the club, CJRobson59, all you have to do is look at my Royal Family Tree to see how far that someone can trace back their royal family bloodlines, but sadly you should expect to beat your head against an stone wall and be disbelieved and have other people scoff forever untill your in your own grave about what you found out.

The archaeologist Dr. Francis Pryor has broken up the concept that there was no King Arthur, I have broken up the concept that there were no cousins to King Arthur, it is through Queen Gweniviere and her father, King Fergus MacGilicuddy's bloodlines that I can trace to an reasoniable time period that these people not only existed but had children and grandchildren that makes Queen Elizabeth II and all her Germanic Royal Monarchy Bloodlines simply upsurpers. Sadly nobody will believe me nor help prove it true, accredited historians have all ready wrote about these bloodlines before but never connected them, they lead in several twists and turns right from Northern Ireland from Red Bay, of 544AD right to Nova Scotia, Canada, Cornwallis Township of 1761AD and finally will end with my death sometime in the next 20yrs or so.

Welcome to the Club of unknown royal bloodlines....I will never see my rear on the throne of England in my lifetime because Queen Elizabeth II already knows my bloodline yet is not about to let her brood be displaced.

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 24 Jun 2008 2:57PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Breheny, Briwere, Brewers, Baose, Brusters, Brewsters
sl_mayes it is not wishful thinking on your part, I too am of a cousin of King James I, going right back to King Richard I and King John Lackland I......but sadly no historian nor genealogist that is accredited and universified will never want to tackle neither yours nor mine bloodlines for fear of ever not getting university grants from their own governments nor stepping out on limbs where their crediability will be questioned by their peers.

You and I have come to the end of the road on Royal Bloodlines, unless the laughing behind our backs is stopped then no serious research will ever be done.

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 24 Jun 2008 3:06PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Breheny, Briwere, Brewers, Baose, Brusters, Brewsters
Yvonne, sadly none of what you have found out will be believed......you actually have to trace your bloodlines right through the current Royal Monarchy Elizabethian II Family to be believed. I can trace mine to the DarkAge Arthurian cousins as far as King Fergus MacGillicuddy but it does me little good for I am laughted at and scoffed at, worse when I get angry at the Naysayers that one has to deal with, then I have to beat my head against the wall for people resort to thinking it is all fairytales after all.

People are that low and petty, though they should actually be smarter these days, sadly the socalled accredited genealogists are making scads of money at all our expenses and are only going so far and no further in tracing bloodlines, certainly no one wants to connect true bloodlines to the Royal Family for Queen Elizabeth II would not be sitting on her throne in her ripe old age if the Royal Historians actually did their jobs.

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 24 Jun 2008 3:14PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Breheny, Briwere, Brewers, Baose, Brusters, Brewsters
Khalidahbilquis, yes it can be and it took me all of 18yrs, if you look at my Royal Family Tree Bloodlines then people will see it goes right back to the 544AD. Right too 1896AD, on a trail from Red Bay Northern Ireland to Kings County, Cornwallis Township, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Sadly only Upsurpers get on the Throne of Britain and can be the only ones to change history of the world, upsurpers such as Queen Elizabeth II knows that her own ancestor Queen Elizabeth I was an upsurper that chased an British Royal Cousin of one William III Brewster out of England in 1620AD and in doing so, killed any chance of the Queen Elizabeth II of continuing her bloodline.

Worse yet, my own personal bloodline will be ended in a mere 20-30 years when I die......it will be forever lost, such secrets I will take to my grave and the British Upsurper Monarchy will simply keep moving along yet run out of steam in a century. History is rather strange that way.

Re: Royal bloodlines

Posted: 27 Jun 2008 3:43AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi cousins!

I also come from the William brewster line(s). Mine is the one from the Mayflower. So the line is not dead!!!!

I recently went to a Scottish "gathering of the Clans" in NC and at one of the booths found a book about Celtic Shamans. They seem to claim that the reason the "royals" were so important was that they were descendents of the "Gods"...who had a hand in populating the earth in ancient times. They stress that the only route to being a Celtic Shaman is that you must descend from one of these ancestors because the "power" of these alien beings is still in the DNA!!!!!

hmmmmm....maybe we do have a little "extra" something to us????

bonnie
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