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Occupation translation in German?

Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 27 Mar 2012 1:46AM GMT
Classification: Query
On the marriage record for Casper Burmeister,can anyone make out his occupation on the attachment?? Thanks!
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Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 28 Mar 2012 9:46AM GMT
Classification: Query
angehender Gärtner

translate by google: budding gardeners

old description Gärtner:
http://www.krumhermersdorf.de/literatur/drucke/lange_1936.ht...

can be a small farm with "1/8 Hufe"







Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 28 Mar 2012 10:19AM GMT
Classification: Query
FamFo,
what do you think about a "Häcker" (Kleinbauer)?
A budding peasant or a peasant-to-be.
Jörg

Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 28 Mar 2012 10:23AM GMT
Classification: Query
I have seen google produce "maggots" from "Maedchen" and now the gardeners are "budding" - well why not, they should be growing plants!! Seriously this word can be used as "budding" in the English sense of "future", i.e. "a budding singer/star/politician" usw or for an expectant father (ein angehender Vater). It is not modern usage and I do not know the details of 18th century training for gardeners but I think it would have had to be a gardener in some sort of training or apprenticeship - with the budding confined to the plants in his care. Hope this helps.

Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 28 Mar 2012 10:50AM GMT
Classification: Query
Halpark,
Nobody is perfect.
And what is "angehender Bauer" in English:
a trainee farmer a farmer-to-be,a farmer apprentice or a
farm learner or what else ? No idea !
Jo

Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 28 Mar 2012 3:08PM GMT
Classification: Query
Jo,
Never suggested anybody should be perfect. As we are talking about 18th century language it is probable it is impossible to define. What I do know however is that Botanic Gardens, Physics Gardens, famous parks did have armies of gardeners even two hundred years ago and some of them would undoubtedly have been through some sort of training or apprenticeships. I can imagine someone referring to the students at agricultural colleges being described as "future" farmers or "the farmers of the future" but I do not think anyone would refer to them as "budding" farmers. In this sense budding has a very slightly patronising/perjorative note - the description a "budding politician" could describe someone who is a bit too full of him/herself. Very subtle. What is the context of your "angehender Bauer"?

Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 28 Mar 2012 4:30PM GMT
Classification: Query
Halpark,
Okay , I see ! Thank you very much !
There is no context "angehender Bauer or angehender Gärtner".
What does mean "angehender" in this case, in training or
to be ?
Jo

Gärtner-Häcker

Posted: 28 Mar 2012 4:42PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 28 Mar 2012 4:43PM GMT
@Jörg

Nur gutes. Eine Frage die ich mir auch gestellt habe.
Ich hoffe, wir haben den Fragenden nicht zusehr verwirrt.

Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 24 Jan 2013 11:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
I hate to throw the discussion off course, but the occupation is Häcker for sure. "ange•ender" is probably angehender, but the h is badly formed as if the ink did not flow from the pen on the down loop. (I can't think of another word to fit.)

I am still learning about the word Häcker. its use depends on where in Germany you are. A common definition, especially in northern Franconia by Wurzberg refers to someone who loosens the soil in terraced vineyards or otherwise is involved in viniculture.. However, wine is not widely grown in Germany. In my ancestral village, I believe it referred to farming of Hops. A Hake refers to a hoe or maddoc-type tool used to break up the soil. I have heard Germans tell me it is a person who clears the land in preparation for farming. It is a rather lower-status occupation than a full Bauer, Okenom, or perhaps even Haüsler (small farmer). The above refers to agriculture-related occupations. When combined with other occupations, it can refer to butchers, woodcutters, etc. The root word is hacking with similar meaning to english.

Angehender would refer to a "Häcker to be", someone who might not yet be on his own. I would have expected the word to refer to someone with a craft-trade instead of a lowly small farmer, but I am already at the limit of my knowledge!

Hope this helps.
Peter

Re: Occupation translation in German?

Posted: 25 Jan 2013 12:49PM GMT
Classification: Query
FamFo hat gesagt sie hoffte wir haben den Fragenden nicht verwirrt - ich glaube ich bin die Verwirrte! The original problem was with google's translation (avoid unless you are desperate) translation of "angehender" as "budding". It can be used in English but not in this context. It could be (according to the New Oxforsd Thesaurus) promising, up-and-coming, rising, coming, in the making, aspiring, future, prospective, with potential, potential, beginning, fledgling,, incipient, embryonic, nascent, developing, growing, burgeoning or even would-be, wannabe. More or less the conclusion already arrived at. Eine Hacke is a hoe (also other cutting tools) but whether 18th century hoes ressemble modern tools is another question and whether it is a "maddoc" type tool is also confusing. This word does not appear in the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary - could be Welsh possibly, or American (I am no expert in those languages). But what realy worries me is the contention that "However, wine is not widely grown in Germany" - am I to believe that Pfalz, Saale Unstrut, Rhein, Hessische Bergstrasse, Baden, Wuerttemberg, Mosel, Franken, Rheingau, Ahr, Sachsen, Rheinhessen and Nahe have suddenly disappeared off the map? I need a glass of that excellent Riesling I dragged backed through the Chunnel last week.
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