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translation help with a hand-written postcard

translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 29 Jan 2013 1:19PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 29 Jan 2013 1:19PM GMT
Surnames: Kreisz
I am very lucky to have dozens of postcards sent to and from my great grandfather after he immigrated to America from Hungary. Unfortunately, I have a hard time trying to translate the hand-written letters.

I'm attaching the front and back sides of one postcards that I'm hoping can be translated. Any help is greatly appreciated.

I originally posted this in the Hungarian forum only to find out the first postcard I chose to have translated is apparently written in German.

Thanks,
Kurt Kreisz

P.S. I can attach a bigger image if it helps.
P.P.S I recently learned that some of my distant Hungarian relatives only spoke/read German, so some of my postcards might be in German
Attachments:

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 29 Jan 2013 2:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi Kurt,

this is German but maybe not written by a native speaker. So I have a few problems to find out what he means. It's a Christmas card to a Jakob who he addresses as Kobi (nick name or short form)written on Dec. 2 (or(9 1903 in Vienna (Wien)
Dear Kobi, I wish you all teh best for the Christmas days to come. Also all the best for your sister and brother-in-law. Good luck for next year, may Vienna .......And for you Kobi a very happy 8married) life together with your wife. Dear Kobi, I would like to ask you something if this is possible for you
.................

Sorry, I can't decipher this. Someone else might be able to.

Gaby (Germany)

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 29 Jan 2013 6:51PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks for the reply. Knowing that Kobi is short for Jakob, actually helps a bunch, as I've seen lots of information regarding Kobi in my dad's genealogy research. Now I just have to find it again.

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 29 Jan 2013 9:08PM GMT
Classification: Query
They were likely Danube Swabians -- ethnic Germans who lived in Hungary for a couple of hundred years and retained their own form of the language. While they would have also have spoken Hungarian, they likely spoke German at home and wrote it as they spoke it (ie, literally). Depending on the age, they would not have learned German in school.

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 29 Jan 2013 9:27PM GMT
Classification: Query
I got a bit more...

Lieber Kobi:

Ich wuensche Dir alles gute zu die Feiertage so auch deine lieber Schwester and Schwage wuesnsche ich alles gut and wuensche dich and mir viel glueck fuer nachestes Jahr dar um der lieber Gott _______ das wir zusammen kommen _____ und glucklich.

Liebe Kobi, ich bitte dich, wenn es dir moeglich ist fur ____ _____ und wenn es auch nicht viel _____ fuer ____ die ____ eine viele warten so ____ gegruesst und _____ von deine dir lieber den Katory(?). Viele grusse an deiner lieber Schwester und Schwaeger.

Schreibe so fort.

Perhaps with more of the text, we can figure out what he was asking for??

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 30 Jan 2013 4:45AM GMT
Classification: Query
It is very interesting to hear about Danube Swabians. Where can I find more information?

Thanks for the information.

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 30 Jan 2013 1:15PM GMT
Classification: Query
www.dvhh.org

We have a long and interesting history. Do you know from which village your family was from?

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 31 Jan 2013 4:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
Kurt and Eileen,
and a bit more..

dar um der lieber Gott _______ das wir zusammen kommen _____ und glucklich.

dass uns der liebe Gott hilft, daß wir zusammenkommen (kuhmen) können (kehnen) und glückliche Ehe verbringen.
There is a slash before the word "kehnen".
Can't decipher what she is asking for.
"Ehe" means marriage.
So I think that were greetings from his wife, Katherina ???
from Germany to the USA.
And yes, Eileen, I also think they were "Donauschwaben", Danube Swabians. http://www.donauschwaben-usa.org/
Jörg



Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 31 Jan 2013 4:54PM GMT
Classification: Query
Sorry, not greetings from Germany, but from Vienna, at that time Austro-Hungarian Empire.
J.

Re: translation help with a hand-written postcard

Posted: 31 Jan 2013 8:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
This is very helpful. Jacob's wife was Katherine (American spelling). I know she didn't immigrate with Jacob, as I have found information on which boat he came over on. But I haven't been able to find any information of her arrival. I had always assumed they were married before he immigrated, but I didn't know for sure. This seems to confirm they were married before they immigrated.

Thanks,
Kurt
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