Search for content in message boards

Please answer!

Please answer!

Posted: 20 Nov 2011 9:39AM GMT
Classification: Query
Would some immigrants just change there last name ? Was this common? It seems as if some do that. Like Kozatek to Brooks? Or three different spellings of Kozatek.

Re: Please answer!

Posted: 21 Nov 2011 4:03PM GMT
Classification: Query
Yes and no. Some did change their name but it was not common. If they did change their name, it was usually to reflect a more anglicized spelling or easier pronunciation for those speaking English. Even less common was to change to a translation - Czarnecki = Schwartz = Black; or Kreutz = Cross. Least common would be to adapt or adopt an entirely different surname.

I am not fluent in any of the Slavic languages (I think it is probably more Polish than anything else) but as far as I can tell it is not translatable. I also tried to translate brook and stream into several languages but came up with nothing remotely even close to Kozatek or Koziatek.

I have been reading a variety of forums like this for many years and it seems to me that name changes were a bit more common within Jewish tradition but I have no hard facts to back that up.

Jerry

Re: Please answer!

Posted: 11 Jan 2012 9:54AM GMT
Classification: Query
When checking for my family members through The Archives UK, I came across the naturalisation of persons from Russia, Poland, etc., and many did change their names upon being naturalised (British Citizen) and they did this in an official way.

I am unable to speak for American immigrants and what they may have done, but in the British cases, the names were totally different.

Good luck with your searchings.

Maria

Re: Please answer!

Posted: 9 Jan 2013 3:01PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 9 Jan 2013 3:03PM GMT
I think it would be somewhat common to change last names. My last name (Dipert) used to be Deibert around 1800. The pronunciation would sound more like Deibert, but whoever wrote it down forever changed the name. I found the family of Dippert who are related, and a teacher apparently told one of the kids he spelled and pronounced his name incorrectly. My great uncle had last name of Ahnger but on the ship manifest and city directories of Leadville, CO (where he emigrated to from Finland) show his name as Anger. My first wife's family name was Stone--her father's family were French-Canadians whose original name was LaPierre--which apparently means "Stone" in French. And, I have found that the handwritten documents such as ship's manifest are often transcribed incorrectly--for example my grandmother's first name of "Aino" appears as "Amo" on the manifest.

Re: Please answer!

Posted: 28 Jan 2013 5:25PM GMT
Classification: Query
Re: family name change 29 Jan 2013
My grandparents came from Eastern Europe with a name that was the same as a person that was hanged at Nuremburg. They subsequently changed their name to a totally different name. From an "S" name to a "Lorin" name.
PJanine V
Ohio
per page

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | Privacy | Terms and Conditions