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Town in Germany

Town in Germany

Posted: 19 Apr 2013 4:59PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Kurek

Hello,

In March of 1906 my maternal grandfather's mother and he and his siblings left for the United States. They were of Polish heritage and I have been told stories that they were from Posan. On the ship manifest it says the last town before departing Germany (Bremen)was as follows: Kohensa??a. Would someone have a thought as to what town this might be?

Thanks so much.

Regards,

SueDee

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 20 Apr 2013 1:09AM GMT
Classification: Query
Can you post the original image?

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 20 Apr 2013 7:32AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello SueDee!

The name is Hohensalza.

Why didn't you attach the record? So helpers don't need to search for it by themselves.

Regards
Bea

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 20 Apr 2013 10:16AM GMT
Classification: Query
Sue,
As you may not be as experienced as some a bit of simple history might help. At the time your grandfather left Europe Posen was both a city and a county in the Province of Prussia which was in the German Empire. The population was a mixture of Germans and Poles. After the end of WW1 Poland regained its independence after having been divided up between The Russian, German and Austro-Hungarian Empires for more than 100 years and Posen reverted to the Polish name of Poznan. In 1939 the Germans invaded and occupied that part of Poland but in 1945 were driven out and Poland was re-established although with different borders because Stalin had grabbed the eastern half of the country and had no intention of giving up what he had taken. This meant the western Polish border was moved to the line of the Oder and Neisse rivers which you can see if you Google up a map of Poland today. During the years of German rule the towns and cities officially had German names although the Polish speakers would use the Polish names. Nowadays the city of Posen is Poznan in the Province of Wielkopolskie (Greater Poland), Hohensalza is Inowroclaw, north of Poznan near Bydgoszcz which was Bromberg under the Germans. I would suggest you Google these names, or some of them, which will help you to get the bigger picture. What looks like an "l" in Inwroclaw actually has a little line through it and is pronounced (very roughly!) a bit like a soft "w". Hope this helps a bit. Good luck with further searches.

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 20 Apr 2013 2:16PM GMT
Classification: Query


Hello Bea,

I am not very computer literate nor have I been doing this ancestry thing for very long. I did not know how to attach the document, sorry. Many thanks for your quick reply. I did not mean to make extra work for anyone.

Regards,

SueDee

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 20 Apr 2013 2:30PM GMT
Classification: Query


Hello,

I was thrilled to get your reply with all the background information. My Mom was a very private person and I grew up thinking that her maiden name was Kurk not Kurek. I really appreciate your thoughtful reply and hope to be in touch. Is there a certain part of Germany you are more involved in researching? Maybe our ancestors are from nearby places.

Again, Many thanks.

Regards,

SueDee

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 20 Apr 2013 5:54PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Kurek


Hello,

Thank you for your contact. I am not sure how to post the original image.

Regards,

SueDee

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 20 Apr 2013 11:40PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello Sue,

never mind. I had luck and found it quickly. I must see what you are asking for. I can read and transcribe but I'm not clairvoyant.

You can share the images on ancestry directly via facebook, twitter or e-mail. Or you save it to your computer then you can post or attach it anytime anywhere. So here it is for everyone. See attached.

Regards
Bea



Attachments:

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 21 Apr 2013 7:59AM GMT
Classification: Query
Sue,
Glad it helped. No, I do not think we are related! I am a complete English mongrel with a Spanish maiden name and German speaking plus three other languages. Long story!. One of my degrees is in European history, another in the History of Science and Medicine. With the languages I have had a lot of contact in the latter subjects with Central and Eastern Europe. I started dabbling in genealogy looking for the marriage of my gt.grandmother (I have come to the conclusion she didn't, despite Victorian respectability) and have found that my knowledge of both Europe and the languages has enabled me to offer help and made a most enjoyable hobby - but I cannot see any reason to be conceited and arrogant towards beginners. A simple explanation of the terribly tangled history of ethnicity and citizenship in parts of Europe, e.g. why were your Polish ancestors "German"?, is often a great help. No one is forced to offer anything on these boards and if one chooses to do it, it seems to me to be just simple bad manners to take a pompous attitude to those who have not yet learnt much. We all started somewhere. Anyway, if you think I can help further do ask. Good luck - and do get Googling, it will be a great help to get the picture.

Re: Town in Germany

Posted: 21 Apr 2013 9:42AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello,
look here to see about the polish collection:
http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en&miejs...


Monika
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