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54th SQUADRON of the 63rd TROOP CARRIER WING

54th SQUADRON of the 63rd TROOP CARRIER WING

Posted: 3 Apr 2008 11:13PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: BRUMM
Seeking ANY information on this group of Air Force.
March 1959 C-124, cargo air crash, in Turkey.

Survivors: Capt. Eugene Nejick, 1st Lt. Dale E. Wilson, 2nd Lt. Albert E. Howell, T.Sgt. Cecil S. Mitchell, A1C Donald H. Shong, and A3C Kenneth F. Scott.

S.Sgt. Leonard S. Sells suffered head injuries, and he also may have survived the crash.

My Dad, A1C Donald H. Brumm, died, as also M. Sgt. Albert Werling.

Any information about this crash, or survivors, would be helpful. I know it has been a long time, but this has never been a tragedy I could handle.

I need to know WHY ?????

Lynda Leah

Re: 54th SQUADRON of the 63rd TROOP CARRIER WING

Posted: 31 Jul 2008 2:41PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi,

I hope this helps somewhat.

Accident Reports - sometimes difficult to locate, maintained by the Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) on microfilm. An accident report can run from just a few pages to a half dozen or more pages and may even include photos of the accident.

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA): Located at Maxwell AFB Alabama

Mailing address

AFHRA/RSA
600 Chennault Circle
Maxwell AFB, Alabama 36112-6424

**************************************

Unit Histories, War Diaries, Daily Reports, Station Memorandum, Special Orders, Public Relations Reports, Loading Lists, etc. - these unit documents are archived by the Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) at Maxwell AFB, Alabama.

You can usually obtain squadron and group historical summaries at no cost through written request. You should also be able to obtain a specific monthly squadron diary upon request. A larger request, say for the entire War Diary, would probably necessitate a copying fee.

You can order Group & Unit microfilm at $30.00 a roll from AFHRA. The microfilm rolls are usually divided up between Group histories, Squadron histories, and tenant command histories. You can e-mail AFHRA to obtain the roll numbers for your unit.


Re: 54th SQUADRON of the 63rd TROOP CARRIER WING

Posted: 18 May 2010 6:49PM GMT
Classification: Query
I am sorry but I did not know your Dad Lynda. I was in the 54th Troop Carrier SQ. at the same time Sgt. Werling was. We were both stationed at Frankfort Germany at Rhein Main AFB on a 6-month TDY from Donaldson AFB, Greenville, S.C. Evidently your dad was also. I knew Sgt. Werling way back when we were stationed at Elmendorf AFB, Anchorage Alaska when the 54th T.C.Sq. was stationed up there before moving to Greenville S.C..This was in 1955 and 1956. We moved out totally to Greenville in the summer of 1956. We used to walk together to Mass to the base chapel on Sunday mornings. He was a good man and a good Catholic. He was highly respected by all his co-workers. I really do not know a whole lot about the crash results Lynda. I remember it was mentioned that all 4 engines shifted from low blow to high blow or vice-versa on take off and therefore the plane could not gain altitude because of the engine loss of power.I am sorry for your loss Lynda. I hope this info helps you. I also knew Sgt. Wells who was injured in the crash., (not Sells like it is wrongly spelled in the posting ). He was "Shorty" Wells. He was the Crew Chief of the plane. He was badly injured with permanet injuries to his shoulder and arm. Sgt. Werling was the flight engineer and a very good one to. The pilot was blamed for the crash which I thought was not justified. Capt.Najeck was demoted to Airman 1st Class over this crash. In Alaska Sgt. Werling and I used to see Capt. Najeck at Mass at the base chapel. Again I am so sorry about the loss of your Dad. I wish that I could say that I knew your Dad Lynda but I did not. I hope this info helps to bring you closure on this tragedy. Joe Weber

( I did not know anyone else on the flight crew other than Sgt. Wells and Capt. Najeck and Sgt. Werling. During my career in the Air Force from the Korean War days on I flew on missions all over the world to many, many islands in all the oceans and seas, to all the continents plus all over the States many times over on the C-124 Globemaster. It was a workhorse of a plane. The cold war years were very active times for the Air Force. They were stressful times also. )

Re: 54th SQUADRON of the 63rd TROOP CARRIER WING

Posted: 18 May 2010 6:49PM GMT
Classification: Query
I am sorry but I did not know your Dad Lynda. I was in the 54th Troop Carrier SQ. at the same time Sgt. Werling was. We were both stationed at Frankfort Germany at Rhein Main AFB on a 6-month TDY from Donaldson AFB, Greenville, S.C. Evidently your dad was also. I knew Sgt. Werling way back when we were stationed at Elmendorf AFB, Anchorage Alaska when the 54th T.C.Sq. was stationed up there before moving to Greenville S.C..This was in 1955 and 1956. We moved out totally to Greenville in the summer of 1956. We used to walk together to Mass to the base chapel on Sunday mornings. He was a good man and a good Catholic. He was highly respected by all his co-workers. I really do not know a whole lot about the crash results Lynda. I remember it was mentioned that all 4 engines shifted from low blow to high blow or vice-versa on take off and therefore the plane could not gain altitude because of the engine loss of power.I am sorry for your loss Lynda. I hope this info helps you. I also knew Sgt. Wells who was injured in the crash., (not Sells like it is wrongly spelled in the posting ). He was "Shorty" Wells. He was the Crew Chief of the plane. He was badly injured with permanet injuries to his shoulder and arm. Sgt. Werling was the flight engineer and a very good one to. The pilot was blamed for the crash which I thought was not justified. Capt.Najeck was demoted to Airman 1st Class over this crash. In Alaska Sgt. Werling and I used to see Capt. Najeck at Mass at the base chapel. Again I am so sorry about the loss of your Dad. I wish that I could say that I knew your Dad Lynda but I did not. I hope this info helps to bring you closure on this tragedy. Joe Weber

( I did not know anyone else on the flight crew other than Sgt. Wells and Capt. Najeck and Sgt. Werling. During my career in the Air Force from the Korean War days on I flew on missions all over the world to many, many islands in all the oceans and seas, to all the continents plus all over the States many times over on the C-124 Globemaster. It was a workhorse of a plane. The cold war years were very active times for the Air Force. They were stressful times also. )
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