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Corley Family

Corley Family

William R. Corley (View posts)
Posted: 13 Sep 1999 7:53PM GMT
I am trying to find Corley relatives who are decendants of my great, great grandfather Thompson Corley born in Mississippi in 1818 and of my great grandfather Charles Denny Corley also born in Mississippi Jan 27, 1859.

Mississippi Corley''s

Mary Lynn Smith (View posts)
Posted: 17 Sep 1999 11:22AM GMT
My grandfather was Charlie Vandorn Corley who was born on April 28, 1892 and died in March of 1976. He married Emma Kitchens and they lived in Covington Jones Counties.

I would like to know about Ms Corley

Bridget E. Williams (View posts)
Posted: 18 Sep 1999 10:42AM GMT
Hi Mary Lynn I have sent off for my great grandfather death certifcate, Charlie Vandorn Corley it should state his parents on it. I just started this adventure. I am Lydia Corley Williams's Daughter Bridget She is Sadie and Charles daugther. I think we met when I was about 13. I would love to chat with please E-mail me at Bribri5050@go.com.

Pauline Corley/Edmond Thompson Corley

Carol Lunsford Covarrubias (View posts)
Posted: 7 May 2000 4:56PM GMT
I would like any info on these 2 people, I believe that Pauline was the daughter of Edmond Thompson Corley, I have a Pauline Corley who married a John Ingram Burton, they had a son who they named Edley thompson Burton.It looks like they keep the family name of Thomsson as this is the story that has been passed down. I do not have any further info on Pauline. I do believe she died in Texas in perhaps the Houston County area. I do know that is where her husband is buried. Edley had a daughter named Pauline, so I think this might be right. Any Help.I think Pauline Corley wa born in 1860 in Al or LA.

Reply: to Corley message board

kathy (View posts)
Posted: 7 Jul 2000 8:42PM GMT
Hi-

My mom's maiden name is corley, her name is Mary Teresa Corley, she is from Ireland. I don't know much about her family, but I know she has a sister, Bridgett Corley.
Are you From Ireland? If so, please e-mail me. Thank you for your time and have a great day!:-)

--Kathy

Sibilings

Shirley (View posts)
Posted: 9 Aug 2000 7:56AM GMT
Hello. I was curious to know if Pauline had any sibilings. My grandmother, Martha S. Corley had many brothers and sisters and we have know idea of there where abouts.Grandma Martha passed away in April of 65-66. She lived in Lexington County, S.C. If any of this rings a bell, please e-mail me. Thanks in advance.

Re: Corley Family

Richard Corley (View posts)
Posted: 21 Nov 2001 8:59PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: corley
Hi I am a decendant of Charles D. Corley as he is my grate grandfather My grandfather is walter d. corley

Re: Corley Family

CORLEY FAMILY TREE (View posts)
Posted: 22 Nov 2001 3:43PM GMT
Classification: Query


Richard, I got your message and was glad to hear from you. It appears your grand dad and my grand dad were bothers. I have heard my dad speak of uncle Walter (your dad) many, many times over the years. My dad died in 1996 at the age of 75.

I have been doing some research on the Corley family and the Holliman familes and will attach what I have. It is really pretty interesting, but you may already have all this.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Bill Corley

By the way where are you living?

CORLEY FAMILY TREE

GG Grand Parents Thompson Corley/Mary Flowers

Their Children:
· Sarah F. or L. Corley born 1844 in Mississippi

· Melinda Elizabeth Corley born 1846 in Mississippi

· Mary Susan Corley born 1848 in Mississippi

· John W. Corley born 1850 in Mississippi

· Christina or Corstian Corley born 1852 in Mississippi

· Lottie Ann Corley born 1-27-1855 in Mississippi, married Jesse Messonger Mathews 11-26-1878 in Paris-Logan County, AR, died
4-10-1934 in Poyen, Grant County, AR, buried in Lindsey Cemetery, Grant County

· James F. Corley born 1855 in Mississippi, married Alabama Mathews on 12-28-1879

· Charles Denny Corley (my G Grandfather), married Amanda Mathews on 11-25-1880

Thompson Corley born in 1818 or 1820 in Mississippi. He married a lady by the name of Mary Flowers in 1842. I do not have Thompson death information, but apparently Mary died prior to 1880. There seems to be some evidence that he married another lady by the name of Polly, but I have been unable to find any information on her.

From some of the research that Anita did several years ago, she writes “Thompson Corley stated in all the census records that his father was born in Georgia. In the early 1800 it seems they migrated to Carroll Co Mississippi and then on to Jasper County, Mississippi. (Jasper County and Carroll Co did not become actual counties until 1833. Up until that time is was known only as the Choctaw Indian Nation). In the 1860 Census there is a William Corley living with Thompson and he gives his birthplace as Georgia. He is only 17 years older than Thompson; could he be Thompson’s father? All of the children Thompson had were with Mary Flowers-Corley, but in 1870 he had a new wife by the name of Polly. She was 7 years younger than Thompson. In the mid-70’s they left Mississippi and settled on the north side of Mount Magazine near Paris, AR in Logan County. The area they moved to had been called Burnett Springs but during the Civil War John S. Corley was ambushed and killed by Union Soldiers near there and they renamed the town Corleytown to honor him. John S. Corley was the first Corley in Logan County. He came from southern Mississippi, the area where Thompson was from and there was another group of Corley’s that came from Alabama. They ran a general store and one was a preacher. This accounts for the large number of Corley’s in Arkansas.”



Corleytown, AR

I don’t know what drew the Corley’s to Mississippi unless it was the prospect of free government land. Jasper County was actually formed in 1833 out of Jones and Wayne Counties in Mississippi.

Newspaper: The Jasper County News - Bay Springs, Mississippi Dated: September 15, 1932


Page: 1, Column: 1.
HISTORIC COURT HOUSE DESTROYED BY FIRE SAT'DAY
TYPEWRITERS AND SUPERVISORS MINUTE BOOK, ALL THAT WAS SAVED.
NINETY- FIVE YEAR OLD STRUCTURE
When fire destroyed the old courthouse at Paulding at an early hour Saturday morning, September 10th, one of he oldest landmarks of East Mississippi went into oblivion. Built in 1837, the old building had witnessed many forensic battles between southern notables. It was at Paulding where the old Clarion, which many years afterward was moved to Jackson and subsequently became the present Clarion Ledger espoused the cause of Jefferson Davis who afterward became a great legal light in Mississippi and the South. The fire was discovered about three o'clock by the parish priest. Father Joseph Marie, who sounded the alarm. However, when residents of the little hamlet got to the building nothing save two typewriters, a few books and the board of supervisors minute book was saved. Valuable records which can never be replaced were destroyed as were the contents of the 11-ton safe which is said to have had its doors open at the time the fire was raging. The safe had been locked the night before with what record books could be stored in it. It also was said by persons who first got to the fire that the fire started at the north end of the building and the doors on the sides of the hall were burning fiercely. The building was built of brick made by slave labor. Paulding many years ago was one of the largest towns of this section of the south. Known as the Queen City of the East. It is said to have ranked third in point of population: at one time. New Orleans, Mobile and Paulding being the most populous towns of that period. Beginning sometime after the war between the states Paulding had dwindled into a mere hamlet with one general store building, the court house (the only one in the county until the second judicial district at Bay Springs was created in 1905) and a few residences besides Catholic and Methodist churches and the high school, remaining. It is the consensus of opinion that the fire was of incendiary origin. but for what reasons the court house was destroyed is a mystery that is baffling to officials as well as the general public. No insurance was carried on the structure or it's contents.

When the courthouse burned in Paulding a huge piece of history was destroyed and unfortunately for those early settlers in south Mississippi, their historic links went up in smoke by a careless clerk , who left the safe open. That probably accounts for the difficulty in tracing the Corley family back further than Great, Great Grandpa Thompson Corley.


G Grandpa Charles (Charlie) Denny Corley/Amanda (Mandy) Mathews

Their Children:
· Walter Denny born 12-1883 in AR, married Eve Lula Holliman, died in 1944 buried in Poe Cemetery, Grant Co

· Robert Corley born 1886 in Prattsville, AR, never married, buried in Ashcraft Cemetery in Grant Co.

· William Albert Corley (my Grandfather), born 1-3-1893 in Prattsville, AR, married Arrie E. Mooney on 8-28-1919, died 9-25-1963, buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Malvern, AR

Amanda had 2 children already by Henry Beardon

· Myrtle Beardon, born 5-1899 in Prattsville, AR, married George Tolan
· George Beardon, born in Prattsville, AR


Grandpa William Albert Corley/Arrie E. Mooney

Their children:
· William Walter Corley (my father), born 6-5-1920 in Prattsville, AR and married Eurma Jean Kilmer on 7-21-1945, died 1-20-1996, buried at Round Hill Cemetery south of Malvern.

· Mary Elizabeth Corley, born 9-26-1921 in Prattsville, AR, married Tom Gill 9-22-1940, deceased and buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Malvern, AR

· Milton Thomas Corley, born 6-25-1927 in Prattsville, AR, married Francis Fry on 4-12-1951. Francis is deceased and buried in Vancouver, WA and Milton is living as of 7-14-2000 and living in Vancouver, Washington.

· Albert Maurice Corley, born in Prattsville on 8-3-1931, married to Mary Jones, died in Oregon and buried there. Mary is still living in Oregon.

· Winnie Beatrice Corley, born in Prattsville on 11-25-1936, married Donald Speed on 12-26-1956 and both living as of 7-14-2000.

· Anita Fay Corley, born in Prattsville on 4-29-1943, married James Bane in 7-2000, both living in Malvern, AR

CORLEY FAMILY TREE

GG Grand Parents Thompson Corley/Mary Flowers

Their Children:
· Sarah F. or L. Corley born 1844 in Mississippi

· Melinda Elizabeth Corley born 1846 in Mississippi

· Mary Susan Corley born 1848 in Mississippi

· John W. Corley born 1850 in Mississippi

· Christina or Corstian Corley born 1852 in Mississippi

· Lottie Ann Corley born 1-27-1855 in Mississippi, married Jesse Messonger Mathews 11-26-1878 in Paris-Logan County, AR, died
4-10-1934 in Poyen, Grant County, AR, buried in Lindsey Cemetery, Grant County

· James F. Corley born 1855 in Mississippi, married Alabama Mathews on 12-28-1879

· Charles Denny Corley (my G Grandfather), married Amanda Mathews on 11-25-1880

Thompson Corley born in 1818 or 1820 in Mississippi. He married a lady by the name of Mary Flowers in 1842. I do not have Thompson death information, but apparently Mary died prior to 1880. There seems to be some evidence that he married another lady by the name of Polly, but I have been unable to find any information on her.

From some of the research that Anita did several years ago, she writes “Thompson Corley stated in all the census records that his father was born in Georgia. In the early 1800 it seems they migrated to Carroll Co Mississippi and then on to Jasper County, Mississippi. (Jasper County and Carroll Co did not become actual counties until 1833. Up until that time is was known only as the Choctaw Indian Nation). In the 1860 Census there is a William Corley living with Thompson and he gives his birthplace as Georgia. He is only 17 years older than Thompson; could he be Thompson’s father? All of the children Thompson had were with Mary Flowers-Corley, but in 1870 he had a new wife by the name of Polly. She was 7 years younger than Thompson. In the mid-70’s they left Mississippi and settled on the north side of Mount Magazine near Paris, AR in Logan County. The area they moved to had been called Burnett Springs but during the Civil War John S. Corley was ambushed and killed by Union Soldiers near there and they renamed the town Corleytown to honor him. John S. Corley was the first Corley in Logan County. He came from southern Mississippi, the area where Thompson was from and there was another group of Corley’s that came from Alabama. They ran a general store and one was a preacher. This accounts for the large number of Corley’s in Arkansas.”



Corleytown, AR

I don’t know what drew the Corley’s to Mississippi unless it was the prospect of free government land. Jasper County was actually formed in 1833 out of Jones and Wayne Counties in Mississippi.

Newspaper: The Jasper County News - Bay Springs, Mississippi Dated: September 15, 1932


Page: 1, Column: 1.
HISTORIC COURT HOUSE DESTROYED BY FIRE SAT'DAY
TYPEWRITERS AND SUPERVISORS MINUTE BOOK, ALL THAT WAS SAVED.
NINETY- FIVE YEAR OLD STRUCTURE
When fire destroyed the old courthouse at Paulding at an early hour Saturday morning, September 10th, one of he oldest landmarks of East Mississippi went into oblivion. Built in 1837, the old building had witnessed many forensic battles between southern notables. It was at Paulding where the old Clarion, which many years afterward was moved to Jackson and subsequently became the present Clarion Ledger espoused the cause of Jefferson Davis who afterward became a great legal light in Mississippi and the South. The fire was discovered about three o'clock by the parish priest. Father Joseph Marie, who sounded the alarm. However, when residents of the little hamlet got to the building nothing save two typewriters, a few books and the board of supervisors minute book was saved. Valuable records which can never be replaced were destroyed as were the contents of the 11-ton safe which is said to have had its doors open at the time the fire was raging. The safe had been locked the night before with what record books could be stored in it. It also was said by persons who first got to the fire that the fire started at the north end of the building and the doors on the sides of the hall were burning fiercely. The building was built of brick made by slave labor. Paulding many years ago was one of the largest towns of this section of the south. Known as the Queen City of the East. It is said to have ranked third in point of population: at one time. New Orleans, Mobile and Paulding being the most populous towns of that period. Beginning sometime after the war between the states Paulding had dwindled into a mere hamlet with one general store building, the court house (the only one in the county until the second judicial district at Bay Springs was created in 1905) and a few residences besides Catholic and Methodist churches and the high school, remaining. It is the consensus of opinion that the fire was of incendiary origin. but for what reasons the court house was destroyed is a mystery that is baffling to officials as well as the general public. No insurance was carried on the structure or it's contents.

When the courthouse burned in Paulding a huge piece of history was destroyed and unfortunately for those early settlers in south Mississippi, their historic links went up in smoke by a careless clerk , who left the safe open. That probably accounts for the difficulty in tracing the Corley family back further than Great, Great Grandpa Thompson Corley.


G Grandpa Charles (Charlie) Denny Corley/Amanda (Mandy) Mathews

Their Children:
· Walter Denny born 12-1883 in AR, married Eve Lula Holliman, died in 1944 buried in Poe Cemetery, Grant Co

· Robert Corley born 1886 in Prattsville, AR, never married, buried in Ashcraft Cemetery in Grant Co.

· William Albert Corley (my Grandfather), born 1-3-1893 in Prattsville, AR, married Arrie E. Mooney on 8-28-1919, died 9-25-1963, buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Malvern, AR

Amanda had 2 children already by Henry Beardon

· Myrtle Beardon, born 5-1899 in Prattsville, AR, married George Tolan
· George Beardon, born in Prattsville, AR


Grandpa William Albert Corley/Arrie E. Mooney

Their children:
· William Walter Corley (my father), born 6-5-1920 in Prattsville, AR and married Eurma Jean Kilmer on 7-21-1945, died 1-20-1996, buried at Round Hill Cemetery south of Malvern.

· Mary Elizabeth Corley, born 9-26-1921 in Prattsville, AR, married Tom Gill 9-22-1940, deceased and buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Malvern, AR

· Milton Thomas Corley, born 6-25-1927 in Prattsville, AR, married Francis Fry on 4-12-1951. Francis is deceased and buried in Vancouver, WA and Milton is living as of 7-14-2000 and living in Vancouver, Washington.

· Albert Maurice Corley, born in Prattsville on 8-3-1931, married to Mary Jones, died in Oregon and buried there. Mary is still living in Oregon.

· Winnie Beatrice Corley, born in Prattsville on 11-25-1936, married Donald Speed on 12-26-1956 and both living as of 7-14-2000.

· Anita Fay Corley, born in Prattsville on 4-29-1943, married James Bane in 7-2000, both living in Malvern, AR
CORLEY FAMILY TREE

GG Grand Parents Thompson Corley/Mary Flowers

Their Children:
· Sarah F. or L. Corley born 1844 in Mississippi

· Melinda Elizabeth Corley born 1846 in Mississippi

· Mary Susan Corley born 1848 in Mississippi

· John W. Corley born 1850 in Mississippi

· Christina or Corstian Corley born 1852 in Mississippi

· Lottie Ann Corley born 1-27-1855 in Mississippi, married Jesse Messonger Mathews 11-26-1878 in Paris-Logan County, AR, died
4-10-1934 in Poyen, Grant County, AR, buried in Lindsey Cemetery, Grant County

· James F. Corley born 1855 in Mississippi, married Alabama Mathews on 12-28-1879

· Charles Denny Corley (my G Grandfather), married Amanda Mathews on 11-25-1880

Thompson Corley born in 1818 or 1820 in Mississippi. He married a lady by the name of Mary Flowers in 1842. I do not have Thompson death information, but apparently Mary died prior to 1880. There seems to be some evidence that he married another lady by the name of Polly, but I have been unable to find any information on her.

From some of the research that Anita did several years ago, she writes “Thompson Corley stated in all the census records that his father was born in Georgia. In the early 1800 it seems they migrated to Carroll Co Mississippi and then on to Jasper County, Mississippi. (Jasper County and Carroll Co did not become actual counties until 1833. Up until that time is was known only as the Choctaw Indian Nation). In the 1860 Census there is a William Corley living with Thompson and he gives his birthplace as Georgia. He is only 17 years older than Thompson; could he be Thompson’s father? All of the children Thompson had were with Mary Flowers-Corley, but in 1870 he had a new wife by the name of Polly. She was 7 years younger than Thompson. In the mid-70’s they left Mississippi and settled on the north side of Mount Magazine near Paris, AR in Logan County. The area they moved to had been called Burnett Springs but during the Civil War John S. Corley was ambushed and killed by Union Soldiers near there and they renamed the town Corleytown to honor him. John S. Corley was the first Corley in Logan County. He came from southern Mississippi, the area where Thompson was from and there was another group of Corley’s that came from Alabama. They ran a general store and one was a preacher. This accounts for the large number of Corley’s in Arkansas.”



Corleytown, AR

I don’t know what drew the Corley’s to Mississippi unless it was the prospect of free government land. Jasper County was actually formed in 1833 out of Jones and Wayne Counties in Mississippi.

Newspaper: The Jasper County News - Bay Springs, Mississippi Dated: September 15, 1932


Page: 1, Column: 1.
HISTORIC COURT HOUSE DESTROYED BY FIRE SAT'DAY
TYPEWRITERS AND SUPERVISORS MINUTE BOOK, ALL THAT WAS SAVED.
NINETY- FIVE YEAR OLD STRUCTURE
When fire destroyed the old courthouse at Paulding at an early hour Saturday morning, September 10th, one of he oldest landmarks of East Mississippi went into oblivion. Built in 1837, the old building had witnessed many forensic battles between southern notables. It was at Paulding where the old Clarion, which many years afterward was moved to Jackson and subsequently became the present Clarion Ledger espoused the cause of Jefferson Davis who afterward became a great legal light in Mississippi and the South. The fire was discovered about three o'clock by the parish priest. Father Joseph Marie, who sounded the alarm. However, when residents of the little hamlet got to the building nothing save two typewriters, a few books and the board of supervisors minute book was saved. Valuable records which can never be replaced were destroyed as were the contents of the 11-ton safe which is said to have had its doors open at the time the fire was raging. The safe had been locked the night before with what record books could be stored in it. It also was said by persons who first got to the fire that the fire started at the north end of the building and the doors on the sides of the hall were burning fiercely. The building was built of brick made by slave labor. Paulding many years ago was one of the largest towns of this section of the south. Known as the Queen City of the East. It is said to have ranked third in point of population: at one time. New Orleans, Mobile and Paulding being the most populous towns of that period. Beginning sometime after the war between the states Paulding had dwindled into a mere hamlet with one general store building, the court house (the only one in the county until the second judicial district at Bay Springs was created in 1905) and a few residences besides Catholic and Methodist churches and the high school, remaining. It is the consensus of opinion that the fire was of incendiary origin. but for what reasons the court house was destroyed is a mystery that is baffling to officials as well as the general public. No insurance was carried on the structure or it's contents.

When the courthouse burned in Paulding a huge piece of history was destroyed and unfortunately for those early settlers in south Mississippi, their historic links went up in smoke by a careless clerk , who left the safe open. That probably accounts for the difficulty in tracing the Corley family back further than Great, Great Grandpa Thompson Corley.


G Grandpa Charles (Charlie) Denny Corley/Amanda (Mandy) Mathews

Their Children:
· Walter Denny born 12-1883 in AR, married Eve Lula Holliman, died in 1944 buried in Poe Cemetery, Grant Co

· Robert Corley born 1886 in Prattsville, AR, never married, buried in Ashcraft Cemetery in Grant Co.

· William Albert Corley (my Grandfather), born 1-3-1893 in Prattsville, AR, married Arrie E. Mooney on 8-28-1919, died 9-25-1963, buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Malvern, AR

Amanda had 2 children already by Henry Beardon

· Myrtle Beardon, born 5-1899 in Prattsville, AR, married George Tolan
· George Beardon, born in Prattsville, AR


Grandpa William Albert Corley/Arrie E. Mooney

Their children:
· William Walter Corley (my father), born 6-5-1920 in Prattsville, AR and married Eurma Jean Kilmer on 7-21-1945, died 1-20-1996, buried at Round Hill Cemetery south of Malvern.

· Mary Elizabeth Corley, born 9-26-1921 in Prattsville, AR, married Tom Gill 9-22-1940, deceased and buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Malvern, AR

· Milton Thomas Corley, born 6-25-1927 in Prattsville, AR, married Francis Fry on 4-12-1951. Francis is deceased and buried in Vancouver, WA and Milton is living as of 7-14-2000 and living in Vancouver, Washington.

· Albert Maurice Corley, born in Prattsville on 8-3-1931, married to Mary Jones, died in Oregon and buried there. Mary is still living in Oregon.

· Winnie Beatrice Corley, born in Prattsville on 11-25-1936, married Donald Speed on 12-26-1956 and both living as of 7-14-2000.

· Anita Fay Corley, born in Prattsville on 4-29-1943, married James Bane in 7-2000, both living in Malvern, AR

Re: Corley Family

Bill corley (View posts)
Posted: 22 Nov 2001 3:57PM GMT
Classification: Query

Richard, I had to do another attachment for the Holimans. If you want this in a word file, let me know.

Bill

GGGG Grandpa James Grantson Holliman

Their children:
· Charles Holliman, born n NC and married a lady named Barbara, died in Alabama

· Cornelius Holliman, born in NC, married Elizabeth Pyler Rainwater, died in Alabama

· Warren Holliman, born 1-26-1801 in Anson Co, NC, married Millie Walters in 1825, died 8-16-1876, buried in Jacobs Cemetery, Grant CO, AR

· Esther Holiman, born in NC, married Elijah Walters, no more information


Warren Holiman (my GGG Grandfather) was born on 1-26-1801 in North Carolina and married Millie Walters (my GGG Grandmother) in 1825. She was born in 1806 in Anson Co, North Carolina, as well. Warren died in Grant Co, AR on 8-16-1876 and is buried in Jacobs Cemetery. Millie died in Grant Co, as well, and is also buried in Jacobs Cemetery, but I do not have a date.

GGG Grandpa Warren Holiman/Millie Waters

Their children:
· Suzanne Holiman, born 1827 in Anson, NC, did not marry, died in 1874, buried in Jacobs Cemetery, Grant Co, AR

· Joshua Holiman, born 12-13-1829 in Anson Co, NC, married Anne Hogue 12-17-1852 and died in 1902, is buried in the Sheridan Cemetery in Grant Co, AR.

· Barbara Holiman, born 4-15-1832 in Anson Co, NC, married Archibald Brumbelow on 8-26-1855, died 8-23-1898, buried in the Tull Cemetery, Grant Co, AR

· Elijah Holiman, born in Anson CO, NC, married Nancy E. Reynolds on 10-25-1857, died 12-21-1920, buried in Poe Cemetery Grant Co, AR

· John Holiman, born 9-25-1836 in Newtonville, Alabama, married Martha Poe 9-28-1858, died 9-10-1862, buried at Old Austin Camp Hope Cemetery Grant Co, AR

· Tilman Holiman, born 11-2-1839 in Newtonville, Alabama, married Eveline Brumbelow, died 4-22-1888, buried in Tull Cemetary, Grant CO, AR

· Sarah Elizabeth Holiman. Born in 1843 in Grant Co, AR, did not marry, died in 1855 (12 years old), buried in Old Lost CR Cemetery in Grant CO, AR

· Jesse Holiman, born 1846 in Grant Co, AR, married Sarah Catherine Ashcraft, died in 1925, buried in Philadelphia Cemetery Grant CO, AR

· Mary Maria Holiman, born 3-4-1850 in Grant Co, AR, married Benjamin Reynolds 1-7-1870, died 6-15-1928, buried in Jacobs Cemetery in Grant CO, AR

· Nancy Jane (Mannie) Holiman, born 9-17-1852 in Grant CO, AR, married Robert Clark Dugan on 2-10-1871, died 7-2-1911, buried in Jacobs Cemetery, Grant CO, AR

James G. Holliman was Grandma Corley’s GGG Grandfather but I also have data one of her other GGG Grandfathers. His name was John Poe (my GGGG Grandfather). He was born in 1785 in NC and died in 1859 in Grant Co, AR and is buried in the Poe Cemetery in Grant. He married Sarah Threet (my GGGG Grandmother) and Sarah died in 1861 and is buried in the Poe Cemetery in Grant Co, as well. I hope this is not too confusing. As an addendum to these writings, I will scan in the family tree charts that I have and that should make it a little easier.
GGGG Grandpa John Poe/Sarah Threet

Their children: (all children born in NorthCarolina)
· William Threet Poe, born 1817, married a lady with the name of Mary H. (no last name), he is buried in Poe Cemetery, Grant Co, AR

· Thomas Poe, born 1819, died in 1861, no other information

· Sarah E. Poe, born 1821, married twice to Ben Reynolds and Henry Halgart (or Holbert) on 1-23-1859, died 1863 and buried in Poe Cemetery, Grant Co., AR

· Oliver Perry Poe, born 1826, died 1-9-1859, buried in Poe Cemetery

· Robert Poe, born 1826, married Martha ?, buried in Poe Cemetary

· Mariam Rosty (Female) Poe, born 1828, died 1877

· Evan A. Poe, born 1830, married a Martha E. ?,

· Nancy Frances Poe, born 1834, married to James Jesse Holliman and William Brewers on 12-13-1857

John Poe and Sarah Threet Poe’s daughter Sarah (my GGG Grandmother) married Benjamin Reynolds (my GGG Grandfather). I have no information on Benjamin Reynolds but Sarah Poe was born in 1821 and died in 1862. Sarah had 2 children Benjamin.

GGG Grandpa Benjamin Reynolds/Sarah Poe

Their children:
· Nancy Elizabeth Reynolds(my GG Grandmother), born 11-8-1841, and died 9-7-1909, not sure where she is buried, maybe Jacobs Cemetery, Grant CO.

· Benjamin E. Reynolds, born 1-7-1848 in Grant Co and married a Mary M. ?, died 12-27-1918, buried in Jacobs Cemetery, Crant Co, AR



Maybe I can make this a little clearer. Benjamin Reynolds and Sarah Poe’s Reynolds daughter Nancy Elizabeth Reynolds (my GG Grandmother) married the son of Warren Holiman and Millie Walters and his name was Elijah Holiman (my GG Grandfather). Elijah was born in North Carolina on 8-4-1833 married Nancy on 10-25-1857 in Grant Co, Arkansas. Elijah died on 12-21-1920 in Grant County and is buried there. Nancy died 9-7-1909 also in Grant County and is buried there, as well.




GG Grandpa Elijah Holiman/Nance Elizabeth Reynolds

Their children: (12/all born in Grant Co, AR)
· James Warren Holiman, born in 1859, married Serenna Blanch Grogan, no more details

· William Bradley Holiman, born 1861, married Handie Ruth Wothan, no more details

· John Holiman, born 1-20-1865, married Lillie Mac Shoptaw, died 8-23-1963

· Tilman Holiman, born 1866, did not marry, died 1873,buried in Grant Co, AR

· Sarah Elizabeth Holiman, born 6-4-1867, married William Sheppard, died 10-21-1955

· Elijah Thomas Holiman, born 1869, married twice to Rosa Belle Russell and Ella Stitt, no more details

· Mary Ann Holiman, (my Great Grand Mother) born 1871, married William (Bud) Mooney, died 10-21-1955

· Millie Cornelia Holiman, born 1873, married Ruben H. Mooney, no more details

· Powell Clayton Holiman, born 1875, married Cora Pearl Shoptaw, died 12-22-1966, buried in Poe Cemetery in Grant Co, AR

· Henry Lee Holiman, born 1877, married Flossie G. Sebers, died in 1930

· Benjamin Frank Holiman, born 1879, married Ella Reynolds, no more details

· Eva Lulu Holiman, born in 1883, married Walter Denny Corley, died in 1964








THE HOLIMANS, HOLLIMANS AND HOLYMANS AS TOLD BY NANCY BERTHA SHEPPARD BYRD IN AUGUST 1977

“James Grantson Holliman (my GGGG Grandfather) was a Revolutionary soldier, born in 1750 in Johnston County, North Carolina. In his pension
petition he stated he was positive of his age, that his father
kept an accurate record of all his children, indicating that
there were others; it also stated that he moved to Lancaster
County, South Carolina (the upper part) in 1792. In the 1790
census he is shown in the Hillsborough District of Wake County,
North Carolina. He received his pension that he applied for,
and died May 7, 1836,

We are probably descended from Christopher Holyman, who
came to Jamestown, Virginia in the early 1600’s. George W.
Holliman, now deceased, who was a lyric tenor with foreign
training, wrote a history of the Holliman family. There are
copies in the Southern History Department of the Birmingham,
Alabama, Library. The Warren Holiman family is partially
reported there.

Records have been checked in Wadesboro, the county seat
of Anson County, North Carolina. Union County, who’s county
Seat is Monroe, is made up of Mecklingburq and Anson counties
in North Carolina. The deeds of Charles, Cornelius and Warren
Holliman (who were the sons of James Grantson Holliman) are
listed there.

The spelling of the name has confused us in our research.
Warren dropped an “1”, as did others at times. It is almost
certain it was Holyman at the beginning, probably derived from
their strong religious convictions. They were dissenters and
fled from England and sailed from Holland to America.

The three Holliman brothers came to Newtonville, Alabama
on horseback in 1835, spent the winter, rode back in the spring
and moved their families from Anson County, North Carolina, to
Fayette County, Alabama. Each of them purchased land from the
government at Newtonville. Charles Holliman bought 80 acres
located where Old Shepherd Baptist Church and Cemetery is now
located. Warren bought 40 acres just west of there, and
Cornelius bought 40 acres formerly known as the Yerby Place.



CHARLES had a big family and remained in the community.
His wife’s name was Barbara (called Barbary). Their children
were:
Asa, born in North Carolina, lived and died at
Duck Hill, Mississippi.

Joshua, born in North Carolina.

John, born in North Carolina, died in the Civil War.

Milly E., born in North Carylina in 1825.

Susanna, born in North Carolina in 1825, never married.

James Jesse, born in North Carolina in 1630, married
Nancy Frances Poe. He died December 25, 1653,
and she moved to Arkansas with her family, later
married W. M. R. Brewer.

Warren C., born in North Carolina in 1833, married
Mary Blakeney, daughter of Captain John Blakeney,
who lived south of the Hollimans and was from
Chesterfield County, Virginia. (He served in
the Revolutionary War with Francis Marion’s
troops. He gave 15 acres to Old Zeur Church
(Methodist) in 1830 and named his son-in-law
and Cornelius Holliman trustees.) Mary Blakeney
died and Warren married Louisa F. Howard.

Cornelius, born in 1835 in Alabama and died in the
Civil War at Petersburg, Virginia.

Elijah, born in Alabama in 1836, died at the age of
97 at Millport, Mississippi, one of the oldest
Confederate States of America veterans.

Aaron, born in 1840 in Alabama, and died somewhere
in Arkansas.

CORNELIUS Holliman lost his wife Elizabeth Pyler and
married the widow Rainwater and moved into the northerly part
of the county. He had five children, three boys and two girls:

Mary, married a Sorrells and moved to Texas.


Sarah, followed her brother to Arkansas, died there.

Uriah, died during the Civil War at Oklona, Mississippi
of measles and pneumonia along with his son Charles David.

Joshua, became a doctor and settled at Magnet Cove,
Arkansas and had a large family.

Elijah, went west and died in Texas.

(I have been in touch with one of Dr. Joshua Holliman’s
descendants, Lois Holliman Wooldridge, of Hot Springs, who is
collecting information of the Holliman clan, which is to go into
a family history to be published in the Record at Hot Springs
some time late this year or next.)

WARREN Holiman (my GGG Grandfather), son of James Grantson Holiman, was born in North Carolina December 26, 1801, died August 16, 1876. He married Millie Walters in Anson County, North Carolina in 1825.

She was born in the same county in 1806. Both are buried at
Jacobs Cemetery. The Holliman and Walters families were closely
linked through marriage. The Walters family settled on Dead
Pine Creek in Anson County, North Carolina. The south line of
their farm was the state line between North and South Carolina.
It is said that the home of Warren Holiman was in North Carolina
and his barn in South Carolina. The names “Elijah” and “Joshua”
in our line of Holimans come from the Walters side. Elijah
Walters married Esther Holliman, a sister of Warren, Charles
and Cornelius.

Warren lived in Anson County until the spring of 1836,
when he moved his family to Alabama, and in 1840 he moved to
Arkansas. He headed the settlers who came to what was at that
time Saline County, serving as wagon master, settling about
one—half mile west of where Trout Trail intersects the Old
Military Road, known as the Camden Trail today.

Among the early settlers of Fayette and Tuscaloosa Counties
in Alabama, were the names of Shepherd, Poe, Yerby, Nall,
Gum, Ashcraft, Wright, Wilson, Price and others who had
migrated earlier from North and South Carolina. Many of these
were in Holiman’s wagon train to Arkansas.


It is said that Warren Holiman had a cow and a horse
hitched together to pull one of his wagons.

In 1840, when they arrived at the place they were to call
home, it was a wilderness and most of them settled near a
flowing spring where wild game was plentiful, as they had to
depend on this for a part of their food. The Warren Holiman
house was located on a rather steep hill just above this free
flowing spring, which is still flowing and has a plank curb.

Warren brought no slaves as did many of the settlers who
came about 1850. He did not believe in slavery, and none of
his children owned slaves except Elijah, whose wife Nancy
inherited some from her grandfather, John Poe, who came to
Arkansas in 1830 with twenty slaves.

He was said to be a witty man, and educated above the
average for his day. Among his accomplishments were: member
of the state legislature and Internal Improvement Commissioner.

He is believed to be the first Mason in what is now Grant
County. On January 7, 1873, a lodge, the Adoniram #288 F.& A.M.
was organized on the Hicks Sugar Farm near Old Belfast Spring
in Grant County with the following officers and charter members:
Worshipful Master - Dr. Jacob W. Hall; Senior Warden - J. W.
Graves; Junior Warden - Warren Holiman; with William Lett,
Elijah Holiman, Dr. Thomas Page, D.J. McDonald, Hiram Holiman,
and James Caple as members. They met in the upper story of a
big log store at Old Belfast. Later the lodge was moved to
Sardis and from there to Mabelvale where it is still active.
We have not been able to learn where Holiman was initiated
into the lodge first, but are working on that as we are on
other stories that we have not exactly pin-pointed.

Warren Holiman was a leader and held firmly to his
convictions. In 1841, the next year after their arrival in
Arkansas, he helped to establish Liberty Church, known first
as Lost Creek Meeting House, later changed to Liberty. It
disbanded in May, 1946.

He, with W. G. Poe, some of the Halberts, Wilsons and
some from what is now Shaw Township in Saline County, and
possibly others, had made a map for a new county just prior
to the Civil War. The boundaries were not the same as Grant
County. The center of the county would have been in Liberty
Community and that was to be the county seat. They had chosen
the name Anson for the county and Poe for the county seat.
After the Civil War a Colonel Vance came to power. The county
was named for a federal general and the county seat for another
federal general. Afterward, the part that included Shaw
Township (the lower part) was partitioned out into Saline
County.

Politically, he was a Whig, later a Republican.

It is still unproven because of the different spelling of
names, but we are fairly certain that Ezekiel Holliman, who
baptized Rodger Williams and helped establish the First Baptist
Church in America is connected with our ancestry.

When you view the Old Belfast Memorial, the name Waven
Holleman on the front as one of the early postmasters should
be Warren Holiman. The mistake was made due to dim and faded
records.

The Warren Holimans had ten children. Four of the ten
were born in North Carolina, two in Alabama, and four in
Arkansas.

Suzanne, born in 1821 in North Carolina, died in
Arkansas in 1874. She was an arthritis victim
and became a cripple. At one time she was
engaged to marry Roddy Corder; he was taken
ill and died. All the old timers referred to
him as a good man from Georgia. Someone asked
Aunt Suz (as she was called) later why she
never married. Her reply was, “Those I could
get I would not have, the one I wanted I could
not get.” She is buried in Jacobs Cemetery.

Joshua, oldest son, was born December 13, 1829 in
County, North Carolina; died in 1892.
He was married in 1852 to Anne Hogue, daughter
of Ezekiel Hague, a Methodist minister. They
settled near the Old Military Road east of
where Trout Trail intersects at “crying corner’,
so named because some of the Hogues- came to
Arkansas, stayed one year, and moved on to
Texas. They caught the stage coach at this
intersection and held together and cried as
they said goodbyes. Joshua served in the Con-
federate Army. He enlisted June 17, 1862 at
Benton, Arkansas, was wounded at Helena in
September 1662, and was sent home to convalesce.
He later joined the Union Army. Joshua and Anne
were parents of the following children:

Millie C. , died in infancy.

Sara Elizabeth, born 1854 in AR, married William Elkin Poe.

Martha Ann, married Dr. J. B. Shaw.

Dr. Joshua Howell, married Mary Sue Reeder.

John, married Mayme Bayless.

Dr. James Elijah Thomas, married Ella Shaw.

Nancy Mariah, married George Walker.

William Harvey, married Vela Mathis.

Olive Mae (Ollie), married Robert H. Allen.

Mollie Nora, married Judson Shaw.

This family later moved to Sweet Home and from
there to Sheridan. They are buried in Sheridan
Cemetery.


Barbara, born April 15, 1832 in North Carolina, died
August 23, 1898. She was married to Archibald
Brumbelow. They had five children to live to
adulthood (several died as babies). They settled
near Highway 190 in what was known as Frog Level
near Nail Lake. Later they moved to Tull.
Barbara’s husband was a Baptist minister. He
helped to organize Liberty (Saline) Baptist Church.
Their children:
Buck, married Geneva Rucker.

Leon, married Ida Young.

Joe Casta, married Pickens Sheppard.

Cora Alice, married John R. Ashcraft.

Dennis, married Cordelia DuVall.
He gave land for churches and schools at Tull,
and they are buried in Tull Cemetery.

Elijah (my GG Grandfather), born August 4, 1833 in Anson County,North Carolina, died December 21, 1920 in Arkansas,
was married October 25, 1857 to Nancy Elizabeth
Reynolds, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Poe
Reynolds-Halbert. They are buried in Poe
Cemetery. They settled a short distance south-
east of the Warren Holiman place which was one—
half mile due east of where Trout Trail intercepts
the Old Military Road near a free flowing spring.
It was at this spring that Nancy Holiman was
doing the family washing and had Warren II in a
box. While she worked a big eagle swooped down
and got him by his clothing and would have
carried him away had it not been for Nancy’s
punching stick. They had a big family consisting
of the following:

James Warren, married Serenna Blanch Grogan.

William Bradley, married Handie Ruth Worthan.

John, married Lillie Mae Shoptaw.

Tilman, died at age 7.

Sarah Elizabeth, married William Sheppard.

Elijah Thomas, married Rosa Belle Russell,
and after her death married Mrs. Ella Stitt.

Millie Cornelia, married Ruben H. Mooney.

Mary Ann, married W. P. Mooney.

Powell Clayton, married Cora Pearl Shoptaw.

Henry Lee, married Flossie Geneva Segers.

Benjamin Franklin, married Ella Reynolds.

Eva Lulu, married W. D. Corley.

Elijah served in the Confederate Army, enlisting
at Benton July 9, 1861, Company A, 11th Regiment.
He was discharged a year before the close of the
War. His wife Nancy, a brother-in-law, Benjamin Reynolds
(my other GGG Grandfather), who was living with her,
and his father, Warren Holiman, went to Camp Hope at Old Austin
above Little Rock and brought him back in a wagon
on a feather bed because his condition was so
fragile. He had had measles and they thought he
had consumption. He carried his discharge for a
year in his pocket, fearful of being picked up
as a deserter. (If you have an opportunity to read
“Cold Mountain” by Charles Frazier, it gives vivid details
of what happened to deserters in the war. You will see
why they were fearful of being picked up as a deserter”)


John, born September 25, 1836 in Newtonville, Alabama,
died September 10, 1862 at Camp Hope in Arkansas
and is buried at Old Austin. He married Martha
Poe September 28, 1858. He enlisted in the
Confederate Army at Benton on June 30, 1862,
Company D, Cook’s Regiment. He and his brothers
Elijah and Tilman were together on Island #10 in
the Mississippi River near Memphis. When their
capture was evident, John, Elijah and another
decided to swim to the opposite side. Their
buddy failed to make it. They joined up with
other troops and came to Camp Hope, where John
died. Elijah gave them his only blanket to wrap
him for burial.

James Joshua, the only child of John and
Martha, married Mary Ellen Pratt, of the
family for which the town of Prattsville
was named. Martha Poe Holiman later married
Hardy Worthan, and is buried at Lost Creek.


Tilman, born November 2, 1839 at Newtonville, Alabama,
died April 22, 1888 in Arkansas, married Eveline
Brumbelow (Archibald’s sister). They are buried
at Tull. He joined the Confederate Army at Benton
July 9, 1861, Company A, 11th and 17th Regiments
combined. He had measles and was in the hospital
on Island *10 where his brothers escaped, was
captured and taken prisoner and freed at the close
of the war from a prison camp in Illinois.

The descendants of Tilman and Eveline Brurnbelow
Holiman were:

Frank, married Margaret Reynolds.

Joshua, married Sarah E. Holiman, daughter
of Jesse Holiman.

Myra, married John Hopkins.

Millie, married George Walker.

Tilman was a singing teacher, taught in schools
and churches in the area. They settled at Tull
and reared their family on a rocky farm. Hoeing
was rough. It is said they visited the Elijah
Holimans, and the children wanted to hoe while
there because his soil was sandy.


Sarah Elizabeth, born in 1843 in Arkansas at the old
Warren Holiman homesite, died at the age of
twelve and is buried at the old Lost Creek
Cemetery (abandoned), known later as Liberty.


Jesse, born in Arkansas in 1846, died August, 1925 in
Arkansas. He was married to Sarah Catherine
Ashcraft. They are both buried at Philadelphia
Cemetery.
Catherine was the daughter of Maston Ashcraft,
whose family was in the wagon train from Hewton—
yule, Alabama. Mr. Ashcraft is responsible for
the story about Warren Holiman receiving the
title of Governor. The story goes that they
elected Mr. Holiman wagon master. On reaching
the Missisippi River they would not send the
raft over to take them across. Holiman sent
word that the future Governor of Arkansas was on
the other side, and wanted to make them a speech,
whereupon they sent for them. The speech was
made and they presented him with a hatchet.
Jesse Holiman settled in the Sweet Home community.
He served in the Union Army. His children were:

Henry Augustus, married Nora Williams.

Lafayette, married Emma Smith.

Clem, married Robert Smith.

Mary Jane, married Bud Brumbelow.

Barbara, married William McCool.

Martha Frances, married Pete Tucker.

Sarah, married Joshua Holiman, son of Tilman.


Mary Maria, born March 4, 1850 in Arkansas, died
June 15, 1928, the last surviving member of her
family. Married Benjamin Reynolds, Nancy
Holiman s brother, on January 7, 1870. They
are both buried at Jacobs Cemetery. They settled
in Sweet Home community. Their children were:

Susan Amelia, married George Roberts.

Barbara Jane, married Fagan Williams.

Mary Elizabeth, died at age 8.

Millie Ann, married Calvin Reynolds (no kin).

Nancy Eveline, died age 5.

Sarah Etta, never married.

Martha Louisa, died age 1 year.

Benjamin K. (known as Bennie) , married

Arthur Stuckey.
Cora Alice, married Jasper Matthews.

George Franklin, married Lexie Young.

Serepta Matilda, married Oliver Williams (no
relation to Fagan).

The Reynolds always had a well kept farm and
orchard. Their yard was a showplace. Their
youngest child is the only surviving grandchild
of Warren and Millie Walters Holiman.

Nancy Jane, born September 17, 1852 in Arkansas, died
July 2, 1911. Married Robert Clark Dougan
February 10, 1871. Both are buried in Jacobs
Cemetery. Aunt Nannie, as she was called, was
the youngest, and her mother lived with her
after Warren Holiman’s death.

Her children were:

George Warren, married Mattie Rumph, and
after her death Martha Jordan.

Arthur, married Alice Richey.

Cordelia, married Pad Gill.

Cornelia (Cordelia’s twin), married Matthew

Tucker.

Jesse, married Delta Hollinger.

Howell, married Emily ?.

Robert C., married Mary Hollinqer.

They also settled in the Sweet Home community.
Whatever else that can be said of our clan, they must have
all had the benediction at their weddings, “May their tribe
increase.” They are numerous, that we know.”

Re: Corley Family

Richard Corley (View posts)
Posted: 24 Nov 2001 6:21PM GMT
Classification: Query
BILL IAM NEW AT THE WEB SO A LOT OF THE STUFF I PUT ON MAY NOT COME OUT RIGHT IT LOOKS LIKE IHAVE MOST OF THE SAME GIVE ME A CALL SOME TIME @501-939-2597 RICHARD
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