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Morley in Ireland

Morley in Ireland

Posted: 17 Jul 2008 4:25PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Morley, Holmes
I've followed my father's mother's family back to Blackburn, Lancashire, England. Census info indicates Ann Morley,dob ~1840, was originally from County Mayo, Ireland. Her husband was Patrick Holmes, originally from Galway, Ireland. Anyone have information on Morley's in Mayo?

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 17 Oct 2008 7:27PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello Elizabeth. Where abouts in Mayo are your Morleys from? Ours come from the Kilmovee area? Anyconnection?
Marilyn Dearden

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 17 Oct 2008 8:43PM GMT
Classification: Query
Marilyn, thanks for your response. the problem is that i don't know where in mayo they are from. my nana always said that her nana had been born in mayo, emigrated to blackburn, england where my great grandmother was born. Then, my great grandmother emigrated to the US and my grandmother and her siblings were all born in Mass, NH and RI. I was hoping that Morley was such an odd name in Mayo that it would be easy to trace them.
Elizabeth Jones

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 18 Oct 2008 1:18PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hello Elizabeth.
Have you ever been over to Mayo at all? The name Morley has ben in east Mayo since about 1590! There is a lot of info about the name on the Morley web site at Genforum.com.
There is also a crest and tartan.
Have you thought of contacting the Mayo family history offices at all?
I looked at your site and noticed that the family moved to England about 1850 which was in the middle of the famine.
My Morley's came from Tavraun, which is near Kilmovee. In that area there are 3 different Morley families!
I have some photos of the Famine Ship memorial out near Westport if you send me you email address I could forward them onto you. It really is a beautiful area and the people are so friendly. We had a wonderful time visiting family that we didn't know were there! Boy can they drink tea!
Look forward to hearing from you.
Marilyn

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 18 Oct 2008 3:51PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi Marilyn, Believe it or not, I've been to Ireland 5 times. Most recently 3 days in Dublin in 2007. But, I didn't know about the Morleys until this year when I found the marriage registration for my great grandparents that listed their parents names. That's when I found Mary Morley was my great great grandmother. I knew about Mayo from things Nana had said when I was growing up. I hope to flesh things out some more before going back to Ireland, not just for pleasure this time but to trace my roots, too.
After trying Irish breakfast tea on my honeymoon in Ireland almost 30 years ago, it is the only tea that I drink! I don't drink nearly as much as they do in Ireland, though. I have seen the Famine Ship on one of my trips. Hard to believe that so many came to the US in such small, flimsy vessels.
Thanks for sharing so much about the Morleys with me. I'm still learning about the many places to look on the web. I will definitely try the Morley site on Genforum.com.
Looks like this is the beginning of a friendship (could we be related?)
Elizabeth

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 18 Oct 2008 7:16PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Morley
Hi Elizabeth!
It's always great to find more Morley's for the tree! Let's keep our fingers crossed. Have you checked out my web site on Ancestry.co.uk? It's MUM'S ROOTS - THE BENNETT - MORLEYS.
You really need to go over and do some research - there is so much to see and do.
Do keep in touch!
Marilyn

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 12 Feb 2011 12:09AM GMT
Classification: Query
Dear Elizabeth: I have a lot of information on Morleys from Mayo. My great grandfather left as a baby in the 1860s.

Recently, I received my DNA results from familytree.com and they provided even more information.

contact me if you wish to exchange information.


Sincerely,

Joseph Morley jmorley11@hotmail.com

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 15 Feb 2011 5:54PM GMT
Classification: Query
Joseph, I sent a reply to the e-mail address after your name including my e-mail address so that we can exchange info. Do you have a public tree here on Ancestry? Do you have a private tree that I might see? I hope we can find some connections between our Morleys since they are all from Mayo.
Elizabeth Jones sherjoneswood@yahoo.com

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 10 Mar 2011 7:48PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi Elizabeth
I live in Mayo,I dont have an account with Ancestery.com and was just surfing when I came across this forum.
Morley's have been around mayo since the mid 1500s, there is a place just outside Knock called Eskerymorilly, which translates to "the sand hill of the Morleys" during the time of the famine a lot left Ireland, not only for America and England but throughout the world.
My uncle tried to trace our ancesters but got stuck in the mid 1800s because so many left or died during this time, I hope you have more luck with your search, the Morley's at some stage must have been seamen, as the morley motto is "Valour at sea".
I hope this helps
good hunting
Pat

Re: Morley in Ireland

Posted: 10 Mar 2011 10:14PM GMT
Classification: Query
Patrick: I am Joseph Morley and live in the US. I spent 20 years living in Europe and made several trips to County Mayo to do some family tree research. Recently, I did a DNA test with familytree.com.

I have the birth certificate for my great grandfather Michael, born in Castlebar, Mayo in 1863, so there is no doubt about where my ancestors came from.

You are right about the surname Morley being derived from Murghaile, sea valor. However, there may be several origins of the Morley surname in Mayo. When I was a boy, my father told me that our surname was derived from MacMearlaoigh – he spelled it out exactly as I found it 50 years later in a book in the Castlebar library. He and his father were certainly no scholars and had never been in Ireland. His grandfather, Michael, had left Mayo at the age of 2, so this story about our surname origin had been passed down orally from father to son for generations.

My next point relates to the Diamond wars fought between Catholics and Protestants in Ulster in 1795, and has led to some educated speculation. Again, when I was a boy, I asked my father about Northern Ireland, having heard it mentioned in a history class. He became extremely agitated and spewed forth profanities, denouncing the land. He never ever did that when England was mentioned. This hatred could only have been passed on from father to son, and must have had a reason. Many decades later, I read about the Diamond wars fought between Catholics and Protestants in Ulster in 1795, and the subsequent expulsions of Catholics to Mayo and other counties. This led me to think that maybe one of those expelled was a Morley. On one list of expulsions that I found at the Castlebar library, was an Owen Murley. Murley is an accepted variant spelling of the Irish Morley surname. It could be that this Owen was the family member expelled. I have not been able to find anything, but not being an expert in history, I might be overlooking a good source. Taking this speculative venture a step further, my great-great grandfather was Owen Morley, born around 1838 in Mayo. Possibly, he was named after his grandfather as was common - the Owen Murley mentioned above.

Finally, oral tradition. There has been a rumor in our family here in the USA about a “black sheep” who was a thief and was sentenced to death by the English during the 1800s. I was able to discover that a Dominick Morley/Marley (Marley is also an accepted variant for the Irish surname Morley) from County Mayo, was convicted of burglary circa 1818 and was sentenced to death. His sentence was commuted to life in the then penal colony of New South Wales, Australia. I now have all of the information on Dominick, provided by English records and Australian records. The point here is that these oral events that have been passed down in my family seem to be based on truth, not wild exaggeration.

There is much, much more, but this is a good start. Any information you may have would be welcomed. We have started doing a huge jigsaw puzzle. I have assembled a lot of pieces, but a lot is still missing.

One of the history books at the Castlebar library showed that Morleys were descended from the O'Flaherty clan, a very powerful clan in Connaught. I have one O'Flaherty name that came up in my DNA test and will be contacting him soon. Our DNA shows that we had a common ancestor around 800 years ago. I believe that was about the time that surname usage became common in Ireland.

Granuaille, Grace O'Malley, the Pirate Queen of Connaught, was married to Donal O'Flaherty and had a child with him. A local Mayo historian, Ernie Sweeney, told me that we had a family link to Granuaille.

By pure chance, I located another branch of Irish Morleys here in the USA who also came from Mayo. We think we are related, but only a DNA test will confirm it. They gave me some letters from their old relative in Mayo, Luke Morley, that he wrote to his sister who came to the USA in the early 1900s.

I hope to hear from you and would encourage you or another male Morley relative to do a DNA test. We have several branches of Morleys from Mayo and a DNA test will end all of the speculation. Please use my personal email
jmorley11@hotmail.com

Sincerely,

Joseph Morley

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