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Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 4 Mar 2013 8:38PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: ratliff, ratcliff, ratclift and also conoway
This post was deleted by the author on 4 Jul 2014 1:19AM GMT

Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 5 Mar 2013 7:21AM GMT
Classification: Query
Linda,
Since the Cherokee never lived in either of the states your ancestor did, is there a reason why you posted your message to the Cherokee board?
If you have a record and/or valid reason for believing she is Cherokee, could you post your knowledge here?
Nan

Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 6 Mar 2013 8:36PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Ratlff/Ratclift/Ratcliff
Sorry Nan if I put it in the wrong place. I have my great grandmother's d.c along with her sister's and it lists them both as NA. Both were born in Wolfe County Ky. This whole research for me has been a trial!! There has never been a Mother's name listed and just in early 2000 a father's name was added to both of them. I found the great aunt in another family's census but my great grandmother was not listed. What brought me to that site was when I found my gr-grandmother in a census going by the name of "Bash" Ratliff (Ratcliff)and then I found who I think is her in another census under the parents of Elizabeth Ratclift and Sidney Conoway. In the Conoway line I have found several women with the same name but variations of Basheba, Barsheba, Basaw and other researchers have this Ratliff branch as being NA with some reading Cherokee and they all seem to be from VA ending up in Wolfe Cnty and Pike Cnty Ky. Should I not be on that site?
Thanks
Linda

Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 8 Mar 2013 1:38AM GMT
Classification: Query
As Nan said the Cherokee never lived in Va. They only claimed a very small tip of it as hunting grounds. But no towns or habitation there. More over that was some of the land thwey sold/ceded to England way before the Revolution.
So since before the revolution they never had any claims to the land in Va. or later West Va. Probably would be best to do a little research as to what other tribes claimed land in that area. Shawnee maybe? I think through family stories other tribes like the Shawnee. That sound somewhat simmular might have mistakenly been "remembered" as Cherokee? we did get the most "press" over the years & sometimes memory being what it is over the long run & telling & re-telling stories. Things get changed to something that sounds like something else or more familiar sounding? Ever play that old game of telephone? Where you start something & tell the next guy & then the next. Arround a big circle & see what it is when it gets back to you? Quite funny sometimes how it gets garbled from the telling & re-telling.

Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 8 Mar 2013 7:24AM GMT
Classification: Query
Linda,
Can you post a copy of one of the death certificates to the board?
You seem to have a lot of first names listed for your ggrandmother. A lot of what you posted is rather jumbled and seems to be mainly conjecture. Assuming that someone is Cherokee/Indian because you found it in other researcher's trees...unless there is an actual record that proves such...is not a good practice to follow.
Since all of the records so far lists them as white and living as white, I see no reason to believe otherwise.
Nan

Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 22 Jun 2013 10:09PM GMT
Classification: Query
Evidently you did not read all of my post. The Native American information came from bot of their death certificates

Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 22 Jun 2013 10:31PM GMT
Classification: Biography
Surnames: cherokee lkiving in Virginia
The Cherokee Indians had many Native American villages spread out along the Tennessee River which runs through the Appalachian Mountains and owned territory that stretched from Virginia to the southeastern part of the United States. The Cherokee are considered to be part of the later Pisgah Phase of Southern Appalachia, which lasted from circa 1000 to 1500 and the original home of the Cherokee, linguistically a branch of the Iroquois, was the southern Appalachian Mountains, including western North and South Carolina, northern Georgia and Alabama, and southwest Virginia. Our people are a Native American people who historically settled in the Southeastern United States. Linguistically, we are part of the Iroquoian language. A map of the Indian Territories in Virginia for 1600 showed our people living in the southwestern location of Virginia. Early explorers traded with the Cherokee people and in the 1500s, Hernando de Soto acknowledged the Cherokee Indians existed during his exploration trips. During the Colonial Period, General George Washington enlisted their services to help fight against the French. Indian villages were established along the southern border of Virginia and in 1677, a treaty between Virginia and the Indians was signed. This treaty outlined the Articles of Peace between Lord Charles II, endorsed and was concurred upon by the Honorable Herbert Jeffreys, Esq'r Governour and Captain Generall of his Majesties. Virginia traders developed a small-scale trading system with the Cherokee before the end of the 17th century; the earliest recorded Virginia trader to visit the Cherokee was an individual named "Dority". There were also several treaties signed which resulted in land being taken away from the Cherokee. The amount of land was not measured in acres, rather square miles. In the 1820s to 1830s, the Cherokee were rounded up and force marched to the west. Some Cherokee resisted and ran up into the mountains to hide and survive; an incident that has both helped and haunted the future of the Cherokee people. Those who were captured became part of one of the saddest episodes of our history, attended to by the United States Government. The federal government forcibly removed approximately 16,000 Cherokee, 21,000 Muscogee (Creek) 9,000 Choctaw, 6,000 Chickasaw and 4,000 Seminole. Men, women, and children were herded into makeshift forts with minimal facilities and food, then forced to march the thousand mile trek. The route of travel was either by water or land, both routes presented harsh conditions. These routes they traversed and traveled became known as "The Trail of Tears" or, as a direct translation from Cherokee, "The Trail Where They Cried" ("Nunna daul Tsuny").

In the early 1900s, not only the Cherokee, but other Indian people from Virginia would be subjected to yet another form of racial discrimination. During the reign of Dr. Walter Plecker, the first director for the Virginia Department of Vital Statistics, a system of eradicating was being instituted, in the form of birth certificates. Dr. Plecker tried to eradicate, not only the Cherokee, but all Indians in the State of Virginia. He mandated the birth certificates label a person either black or white, no exceptions. It was discovered that some census records listed Cherokee people as black and not Cherokee or Indian. Dr. Plecker’s decision to impact the Indian population was reversed in 1997 when, Virginia Governor George Allen signed a bill making it easier for Indians to apply for corrected a birth certificate. Even with this bill passage, the damage Dr. Plecker administered was done and is still being felt today.The leadership of our tribe has strived to keep and promote the values we hold true to our hearts. The lives of Chief Raymond Lonewolf Couch and Grandmother Mary Duty are benchmarked examples how the Cherokee people should live their lives. Chief Lonewolf Couch ensured the stories and messages from his father, grandfather, and great grandfather were remembered and passed down to the tribal members. Grandmother Duty never turned anyone away who needed help. Her doors and arms were opened as she welcomed people into her home regardless of the color of their skin. Her strong spiritual messages to those she contacted were from her heart and were handed down in a message by the Great Spirit. Her advocacy for those in need earned her the respect of both superiors and community leaders. Both of these tribal leaders had a yearning to see the indigenous Cherokee of Southwest Virginia be taken care of. They made trips to take food, clothing, and other needed supplies to the land where our ancestors lived and survived. Their leadership and teachings to this tribe were priceless and will never be surpassed. They affected so many lives and each walked the red road until the Creator called them home. Today, it is important our children are taught the heritage and culture that Chief Lonewolf Couch and Grandmother Duty lived. In the words of Chief Lonewolf Couch, I heard many times, “Grandfather, grant us a moccasin trail that our children will be proud to follow.” AHO!


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Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 22 Jun 2013 10:35PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: ratiffs from Virginia living with Cherokee
Well, according to the Appalachian Cherokee Indians that I came across and also pasted below, there were Cherokee in Virginia and there were also Ratliffs living with them. As I told Nan, my information did not come from general discussion among people. My great grandmother and her sister are both listed as NA/White on their death certificates. I went to Ky Vital Statistics office and they confirmed to me what is on the death certificates is correct

Re: Ratliff/Raclift VA to KY Native American

Posted: 27 Jun 2013 1:58AM GMT
Classification: Query
Ok that explains where you got the information. Just one of the 350-500 boggus "Cherokee Tribes". They put together boggus, conflicting & missleading garbeled histories that sound correct. But are nothing more than a "story" to cover their emagined history. It would be best if you stuck to accredited histories by accredited authors such as "The Cherokees A Population History" by Thornton. "The Cherokee Natio A History" by Robert J. Conley ( A cherokee Citizen himself). There are many very fine books on the subject & a whole lot of false & missleading information on the internet & from these false "Cherokee Tribes". There are only 3 Federally Reccognized Cherokee entities. Any one else is lyeing feeding their own egoes & thrying to "prove" their ancestries that are plain false. if you family was from Va. & you believe them to be Native. I suggest you look elsewhere for the tribe it wasn't Cherokee. Could be Delaware or Shawnee perhaps.

KY Death Records Online

Posted: 27 Jun 2013 4:43AM GMT
Classification: Query
Linda

Kentucky Death Records are online and easily viewable by anyone who has a subscription with Ancestry.com

Lou (Meadows) Hatton's DC is amongst these records. She is clearly listed as white.

FYI : The term "NA" has only really come in to usage in the latter part of the 20th century. It would be most unlikely to find this term in records of the 1930's.


Kathy Roberts
VA


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