Search for content in message boards

MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Posted: 22 Jan 2006 2:57PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: MONGOVEN, MONGOVAN, MUNGOVAN, MUNGOVIN, etc.
Hi,

My name is Jan Patrick Mongoven. My g-g-g-grandfather was JAMES MUNGOVAN, born in/near Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland circa 1801. He emigrated to the US with his family around 1850 and soon found his way to Iroquois County, Illinois. Some of his children produced many more children...and they more...until now there are thousands of descendants of this man and his wife, CATHERINE COSTELLO.

We Mongoven's (Mongovan's, Mungovan's, etc., etc.) know that we are descended from Co. Clare. The surname was primarily found in West Co. Clare, but we have little proof of the origin of the name. Two authors offer us this: "The family name stems from O' Mongavain [O' Mongevaine -- Mongavan, Mungavan, Mungavin]; descendant of Mongvan [white hair]; an old County Clare surname." [From "Irish Names and Surnames" by Rev. Patrick Wolfe; 1923; Irish priest of Limerick; O = grandson or any male descendant.] "(O) Mungovan - O Mongabhain (mongbhan, white hair). A west Clare family." (from "The Surnames of Ireland" by Edward MacLysagh; Irish Academic Press).

Some claim that the name is of Norman origin. I tend to lean toward this hypothesis. Since so many records of the time were not kept or were lost...frustrating to us all...we need help from science. That's where DNA testing comes in. It is my understanding that I will be the first Mongoven (Mongovan/Mungovan, etc.) to be tested. My Y-chromosome will be tested to determine my Y-chromosome's 37 genetic markers. I inherited this chromosome from my father, who got it from his, and so on back to James Mungovan...and to HIS father and so on back into the ages.

With my information in the database, I hope someday to be able to connect my markers with those of families from the Norman region of France. Time (and the wonder of science!) will tell. I'm also having a full mitochondrial DNA test done as well for my maternal (Swedish) side...but that's another story and doesn't apply to our Mongoven side.

I urge any Mongoven men (since men are the only ones with Y-crhomosomes) to visit the website (Family Tree DNA) that is performing my test ( http://www.familytreedna.com/ ) for information and pricing of the simple test kits.

I ask that you inform yourselves and then decide whether or not you wish to participate in this process. We need to solve our ancestral mystery with regard to the origin of the Mongoven (Mungovan) name. The Mongoven Family DNA Project honors the memories of our ancestors. Thanks for any help you can provide.

Sincerely,
Jan Patrick Mongoven

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Chris Mungovan (View posts)
Posted: 24 Jan 2006 12:15AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Mongoven Mungovan Mongovin Mungavan
Hi Jan
We have corresponded before, Like you I can go back about 200 years to one James Mungovan. Mine went to India not the USA. The frequency of the christian name James suggests to me common lineage also.
I have just been to the project website but could not see a Mongoven/Mungovan surname project link.
Am I missing something here or is it not set up yet?
Certainly sounds facinating, just as long as they don't simply tell us we have Irish/Norman/Spanish/Celtic roots. More than happy to share my DNA as long as the statistics stack up.
Can you provide more information?
Happy New Year to you and all Mungovans / Mongovens etc
Chris Mungovan

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Jan Mongoven (View posts)
Posted: 21 Feb 2006 8:46PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Mungovan/Mongovan/Mongoven/Costello/Darcy
Hi Chris ~

It certainly has been a long time since we've corresponded. I do hope that you've read my post from yesterday concerning my home parish "hypothesis" for my James and Catherine (Costello) Mungovan. I am in the process of having my DNA sequenced at FamilyTree DNA and I'm smiling as I read your line: "...as long as they don't simply tell us we have Irish/Norman/Spanish/Celtic roots..." Ha! It is my understanding that they'll be able to pinpoint one of those for us. It'd be great if you'd have yours done at some point. I guess you can wait (about 3-4 more weeks, I'm afraid) until my results are in. In answer to your question, Chris, please go back to the FamilyTree DNA website...unless I'm losing my mind (a distinct possibility at age 55!) I swear I saw a Mongovan (or Mungovan) project up and running. And I want to join that project. Please do go to my post (yesterday's) and give me your feedback on my townlands hypothesis. As a science-oriented person (registered chemist - I imagine that's a pharmacist in America), I do greatly respect your opinion. Take care.

Jan

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Chris Mungovan (View posts)
Posted: 23 Feb 2006 9:59PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi Jan
Yes I looked again and there is a reference to our name but is it just an acknowledgement of your sample or have they already got another Mungovan sample to compare yours with? Worth asking them I think.
Reported in yesterdays newspaper that an article in the journal Current Biology of research linking DNA with men of particular surnames. In UK the chances of men with same surname sharing DNA was 1in 4 but if the surname is unusual the link becomes stronger rising to 50:50. Focused on the Y chromosome .
My very limited understanding of the process suggests to me that identifying corresponding aleoles is in itself almost comparable with comparing the corresponding letters of our surnames.
We know that our name originates in Co Clare and that it has never been really common there. This information alone suggests that we are one family.
Like you I really do want to solve the questions ' are we all related and how far back?' . Leaving aside difficulties with adoption, illegitimacy and the widespead Irish custom of fostering I would like an authoritative explanation of evidence that can confirm that we share gggggrandfathers or whatever.
I think you understand the process more than me.
Can you explain it to us all in the simplest of terms?

RE TOWNLANDS I,m still looking through my notes and correspondence and will come back later on that but I certainly think you are going about it the right way by looking for Mungovan, Costello, Darcy cohabitation. Also it was quite common for the next generation to marry someone from 'back home' (a bit like the Indian custom of arranged marriages) so you can also look for surname patterns/locations with the next generation to indicate original townlands.
Given the fertility of James and Catherine you should have a few more leads in there somewhere.
Regards
Chris

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Jan Mongoven (View posts)
Posted: 3 Mar 2006 6:26PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: MUNGOVAN/MONGOVEN
Hi Chris ~

Go to http://blairgenealogy.com/dna/dna101.html and the Blair Family DNA Project for a terrific explanation of Y chromosome testing. Let me know what you think.

Jan

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Jan Mongoven (View posts)
Posted: 19 Mar 2006 3:55PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: MONGOVEN/MONGOVAN/MUNGOVAN
Hi,

My initial 12-marker results are in and available at the Family Tree DNA website (www.familytreedna.com). My information can be located by searching for kit 51271. I have uploaded my GEDCOM information for James Mungovan (my 3rd great grandfather) and his descendants.

Locus DYS# Alleles


1 393 13
2 390 24
3 19* 14
4 391 10
5 385a 11
6 385b 15
7 426 12
8 388 12
9 439 11
10 389-1 14
11 392 13
12 389-2 30

*Also known as DYS 394

My haplogroup is R1B1. "Haplogroup R1b1 is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing the Atlantic modal haplotype" (from the Family Tree DNA website).

In a few weeks I'll have my 37-marker test completed, which will provide much stronger linkages to a most recent common male ancestor. It will also be important as we ask the question: Was the Mungovan/Mongoven name Norman? Basque? Other??? I strongly urge any Mongoven (including variant spellings, of course) males to take part in this project.

Sincerely,
Jan Patrick Mongoven

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Jan Mongoven (View posts)
Posted: 19 Mar 2006 4:06PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: MONGOVEN/MONGOVAN/MUNGOVAN/etc.
Hi all ~

The Irish Heritage DNA Project is another valuable site. It can be accessed at http://homepage.eircom.net/~ihdp/ihdp/ and my (Mongoven - FTDNA #51271) Y-chromosome DNA markers can be compared to others of Irish ancestry. Perhaps you can find a name that fits with your own family tree. Given the paucity of Irish records, many more of us need to get involved, in order to help solve our genealogical mysteries. Surely somebody in the U.S., UK, Ireland, Australia, Canada, etc. has pictures, Bibles, notes, etc. that can help us trace our family.

Jan Patrick Mongoven

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT - 37 Marker Results

Jan Mongoven (View posts)
Posted: 23 Mar 2006 1:05AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Mongoven/Mungovan/Mongovan
Hi ~

I've completed the Y-chromosome 37-marker DNA testing at Family Tree DNA. My results are available there at www.familytreedna.com and my results are shown next to kit 51271. I also posted my results at the Irish Heritage DNA Project website at http://homepage.eircom.net/~ihdp/ihdp/dna_results.htm . Perhaps it's time for other Mongoven/Mungovan/Mongovan/etc. males to be tested. With solid traditional genealogy, the science of DNA is a powerful tool...let's find out where we originated in Ireland/Europe.

Sincerely,
Jan Patrick Mongoven

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Posted: 20 Dec 2009 5:48PM GMT
Classification: Query
Dear Sir.

I recently had my ydna test completed. Ti states that I am an 85.71 % match to Mongovens. You mentioned Norman, However I am German, or so I believe, and per my DNA...Danish. Would love to compare notes.

Re: MONGOVEN FAMILY DNA PROJECT

Posted: 22 Dec 2009 2:59PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 10 May 2013 6:04PM GMT
Hello,

Thank you so much for writing. I'm not certain about the Norman heritage in the Mongoven/Mungovan line...it's simply one of a few family stories. Regarding your DNA test, I doubt that an 86% match is close enough for us to bother with exchanging our families' histories. It would mean that we might have shared an ancestor hundreds of generations ago. I do wish you good luck with your search.

Sincerely,
Jan
per page

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | Privacy | Terms and Conditions