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christopher Stapp - Texas

christopher Stapp - Texas

Posted: 21 Jun 2000 5:51AM GMT
Edited: 14 Sep 2001 10:35PM GMT
I am searching for additional info on a Christopher Stapp, born about 1843. He lived near Victoria, Texas in 1861 and served in Company A, 6th Texas Infantry during the Civil War.
Please contact me at surveyor@world-net.net
Thanks

Re: christopher Stapp - Texas

Posted: 25 Mar 2002 3:40AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Jul 2003 6:16AM GMT
If you look at the 1850 census of Victoria Co, you will find listed in the household of Darwin M. Stapp, a young 7 year old german boy named Christopher Holhoven and another named Adolphus Bohan. There were many German immigrants coming into the area from the ports at Indianola and Port Lavaca. Also prevelant in the area were frequent epidemics of smallpox. My g-g-grandfather, Darwin Massey Stapp had taken these two boys into his house to raise. In 1860, he had moved to Indianola, TX, in Calhoun Co., where these same two boys were listed again - only Christopher was now listed as Christopher Stapp. Adolphus still carried his family name of Bohan. Both are probably from the Somnes-Branfels region of Germany. Many settled north of San Antonio in a town named New Branfels. Hope this helps.

Ed

Re: christopher Stapp - Texas

Posted: 25 Mar 2002 3:57AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Jul 2003 6:16AM GMT
If you will look at the 1850 census of Victoria County, you will find listed in the household of Darwin M. Stapp two boys named Christopher Holhoven and Adolphus Bohan. In the 1860 census of Calhoun County, you will find the household of Darwin Stapp - D, M. Stapp - includes Christopher STAPP and Adolphus Bohan. In that period of time, German immigrints from the Solmns-Branfels region of Germany were coming into Texas through Indianola and Port Lavaca in Texas. Whether there were actual adoption papers filed by my g-g-grandfather, Darwin Massey Stapp, I do not know. Hope this helps.

Ed

Re: christopher Stapp - Texas

Daniel Snell (View posts)
Posted: 26 Mar 2002 1:05PM GMT
Classification: Query
Ed, Thanks for the reply and the message. I had already figured out the same info. What I am looking for are birthdates, death dates and place, and other interesting information concerning Christopher. I have all his military records, but unfortunately they do not outline what may have happened to him.

Re: christopher Stapp - Texas

Posted: 27 Mar 2002 1:05AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 13 Jul 2003 6:16AM GMT
I don't remember if he was listed on the 1870 Victoria Co census. You might check the census indeces for 1870, or the soundex for 1880, 1900, etc. He was not still living with of near D. M. Stapp in 1870.

Ed

Re: William Baxter, John Smith in Civil War

Greg Smith (View posts)
Posted: 26 Feb 2006 7:16AM GMT
Classification: Query
Daniel,
In your research on the 6th Texas Infantry Regiment you talked about John Smith, born in Germany, who was killed in the battle of Atlanta. Did you also come across his brother, Lewis (born in Texas), who fought there as well?
Thanks,
Greg Smith

Re: William Baxter, John Smith in Civil War

Daniel Snell (View posts)
Posted: 26 Feb 2006 1:23PM GMT
Classification: Query
Greg,
Thanks for replying to my message. The only Lewis Smith I have anything on, was living in Seguin, Texas in 1860, and enlisted into Company E, 6th Texas Infantry. According to the census records, this Lewis Smith was born in Mississippi, he died of desease while a POW at Camp Butler, Illinois, on February 10, 1863. The John Smith who was killed in the Battle of Atlanta, was from Matagorda, Texas and may not have been related to Lewis. He was born in Gernmany, and was living with a wife and two children in 1860 in Matagorda.
Please reply to my email at surveyor@world-net.net

Re: William Baxter, John Smith in Civil War

Greg Smith (View posts)
Posted: 27 Feb 2006 1:31AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Sargent, Smith, Yeaman, Baxter, Schmitt, Sargent, Russler, Savage, Willey
Daniel, thank you for answering my query. Here's the first part of an old article from 1959. (I've posted the article in its entirety on the Matagorda site.) I go through Lewis, John's younger brother and am interested in finding out more about the entire family. Lewis Smith was actually born in Matagorda in August 1834.

"Who Was Who in Lampasas County
PAGE 4-The Lampasas (Tex.) Record, Thursday, April 23, 1959

By E. M. Pharr

PHILIP SMITH

Jacob Schmitt, with his family of four sons, Jacob Jr., Philip, John and Lewis, and three daugh­ters, Margaret, Emily and Mary Ann, left Hesse'n, Darmstadt, Germany in the early part of 1832 and sailed for America via Liver­pool, England, thence to New York. Hearing of the enducements offered colonists who would come to Texas and settle, Schmitt and his family became a part of a colony made up in New York and arrived at Matagorda, Texas in December 1832.
This story will deal primarily with Philip Smith, his family and descendants (the name having been changed from Schmitt to Smith by the father doubtless at the time he took out his American citizen­ship papers). According to records kept by Rev. Andrew N. Smith and W. Walter Smith, the other members of the original family are: John and Lewis, both of whom fought in the Confederate Army in the War Between the States, and John was killed in the battle of Atlanta during the Civil War, Lewis later living at Mata­gorda for a time and then at Abilene and at Fresno, Calif. where he died. Margaret married a Mr. Yeaman at Matagorda. Em­ily married John Russler, a brother of Mrs. Philip Smith, and they lived many years at Scalhorn, Mills County. Mary Ann be­came Mrs. Norman Savage of Bay City. Jacob Smith Jr. came to what later became Lampasas County with Philip and stayed here for a few years, returning then to Matagorda County where he lived the balance of his life and where many of his descendants are now.
Philip Smith, who was born Dec­ember 21, 1821, was 15 years of age in 1836 and too young during the Texas-Mexican war to be in battle. However, he was in Gen­eral Sam Houston's command and an elderly man and he were de­tailed to drive ox wagons moving women and children out of Santa Anna's line of march to Galveston for safety. It was during one of these trips that the Battle of San Jacinto was fought and Philip went back from his last trip to Galves­ton on the same boat with General Houston."
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