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WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 13 Oct 2007 10:13PM GMT
Classification: Query
My American WWII-era father, stationed in Czechoslovakia with the US Army, had a native lover and may have had a child with her. If you have an American GI father and were born between 1945-47, please contact me with details.

Thank you

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 1:09AM GMT
Classification: Query
joank99_1

Czechoslovakia is now Czech Republic and Slovak Republic.
Do you have a town?

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 1:22AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you for your reply. I don't have any names at all because my father's WWII military records were lost in a fire. All I know is that he had a mistress in what was then known as Czechoslovakia who may have had a child sometime between 1944 and 1947. Sorry.

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 1:27AM GMT
Classification: Query
Your welcome.
Have no idea where to direct you. Sorry.

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 3:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
I suspect the Czech Republic, since it wasn't very long after the U.S. 3rd Army crossed the Danube River and liberated Czechoslovakia that Germany surrendered and WWII ended (May 1945), so the Allies did not get very far into the country.

Thank you. Any info you can give me would be appreciated.

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 9:59AM GMT
Classification: Query
I am speaking from memory but I think you will find that although the American Army penetrated deep into Eastern Germany and Czechoslovakia at the end of WW2, (I am pretty sure they liberated Prague), I am also pretty sure all the Allies had withdrawn to the main zones of occupation, American Zone SW Germany, in about three months. Yalta Agreement? It is unlikely that your father was ever "stationed" in Czechoslovakia, the Americans just went in and out again. Of course this does not mean he did not have time to father a child, but if, as seems, you are talking about a relationship of more than a one-night stand I think you might do better to concentrate on the American Zone of Occupation, I think Wiesbaden was the HQ, but do remember the Germans were starving, the occupying armies had food and many friendships were based on the possibility of getting something for them and their families to eat. There were thousands of "Besatzungskinder" (occupation children) probably the majority of whom did not know/were never told who their fathers were. Best of luck anyway.

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 11:43AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you very much for this information. Yes, I think what you have said is accurate; however, my father did say his mistress was Czech and at one point told my mother he was not coming home, so the relationship was more than a "one-night stand." I don't know if there were many Czechs in Eastern Germany during those days after the occupation, but it's worth putting out a query on the Wiesbaden board. Thank you for very much your help. If you think of anything else, please drop me a note.

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 1:39PM GMT
Classification: Query
There is another thought on a little known/acknowledged happening. The Czechoslovakians, along with the Poles, expelled all "Germans/German speakers" often under the most horrific conditions. Understandable I suppose but two wrongs do not make a right! Those expelled (estimated at about three and a half million), from the eastern and northern parts were mostly pushed towards East Germany - check a map. I have a friend in Leipzig who as a baby landed up there with her family. Those from the more western part were pushed into West Germany, mostly Bavaria. There are a lot of descendants of expellees there. If I remember rightly Bavaria was in the American Zone and it could quite easily be that your father's friend was one of these expellees in an area where he could easily have been stationed longer term, a German-Czech, who at that time could have thought she would one day go back and therefore insisted on being "Czech". Could you not get his military record and find exactly where he was stationed - that could narrow the search area by a lot. If you can get a map of present-day Europe you can easily see what I mean because the borders of Germany (now re-united) and the Czech Republic are pretty much the same as they were then. I am sure google would produce a map of the zones of occupation too, which could be useful. Hope this helps

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 1:43PM GMT
Classification: Query
I just re-read your first post where you say your father's military re cords were destroyed in a fire. Do you mean at home? Surely the American military has not lost its central records, which is what I meant?

Re: WWII American GI in Czechoslovakia

Posted: 14 Oct 2007 2:33PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Hatfield
Thank you so much for the information you gave me. Yes, unfortunately, my father's military records, along with millions of other American veterans' records between 1912 and 1973 were destroyed in a devastating fire in 1973 where military records were stored. All I could get was a certificate from the Dept. of Defense acknowledging that he was in the Army, his serial number and dates of service. I had his draft card so knew he was attached to the 3rd Army. Plus, he talked about it somewhat. The rest of the information I have had to research by looking at the activities of the U.S. 3rd Army ("Patton's Own") during WWII. When I saw they were the first American military unit to push into Czechoslovakia I was dumbfounded because I had known about his Czech mistress and the letter to my mother.

This is a very sad state of affairs for the children left behind, isn't it? I have a very good friend whose father was Polish and mother German, who became displaced after the war and only recently found his birth mother in Germany. While I don't know positively if my father had a Czech child, I wouldn't be surprised because of the fact he wrote to my mother saying he was in love with a Czech woman and wasn't coming home. Lucky for me, he did!

Thank you again. (P.S. my father's name was "Hatfield")
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