Search for content in message boards

If you Administer more than one DNA test - please check for duplicates

If you Administer more than one DNA test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 4:16AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 25 Jun 2013 2:03PM GMT
I have just discovered some on my wife's test. Without going into paragraphs of documentation: they are my relations only - but show up in her matches. I think this may be a serious problem brewing? Please check your kits for obvious mismatches. I used the surname finder.

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 4:55AM GMT
Classification: Query
It's not unusual to have one test match two different people that you both know. (You should see how many of us match each other here on the forums!)

My maternal grandmother and my father have over 100 matches in common. They don't share any DNA (per GEDmatch). They do both have deep colonial roots, though, with known ancestors in the same areas.

Do you and your wife have any similarity in your ancestors' locations over the past 10 generations?

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 5:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 25 Jun 2013 5:34AM GMT
There could be a problem as you describe. But possibly there are alternate explanations.

But, and I don't mean to discount what you have found, in my case I was pretty darn sure my wife's DNA must have somehow found its way into my sample. Very many of my matches had surnames that matched her ancestry while comparatively very few surnames matched my ancestry. I thought there had to be some sort of problem somewhere

Since then I have concluded her French Canadian ancestry makes her related to just about everyone with French Canadian ancestry. Her grandfather's family is mostly from Quebec and her grandmother's ancestry is mostly from Montreal. Both date back to the earliest settlers, whereas my ancestry is much more limited in that regard.

Your situation is probably different and I only offer the above as an example of an alternate explanation.

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 6:06AM GMT
Classification: Query
I have now double checked several of my lines which are varied in name and rarity and they are showing up on her matches. Somehow the program is adding my matches to her list. I even verified with the locality search feature for my hometown and her matches show my gr-great Uncle. Her lines come nowhere close to my hometown....I am telling you. There is a problem. Let some others who administer more than one test check and verify.

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 11:52AM GMT
Classification: Query
Not discounting what you're saying, but you should probably do a couple of other things before trying to get help from Ancestry on this. (Only because you're very likely to get a runaround from Ancestry customer service unless you're very prepared to refute their explanations.)

Unfortunately, those other things all involve segment comparison, which Ancestry doesn't offer. In about seven weeks, GEDmatch.com will be accepting uploads again. You can use it to see if you and your wife are DNA-related (I know you don't have a known paper trail) and also if she has any matches there from Ancestry that you expect to be yours, not hers. If she does, then you can see the actual DNA connection. Likewise, if any of her matches here are using GEDmatch and *don't* show up as matches there, you have real evidence of a screw-up.

Meanwhile, just because your wife is a DNA match to someone who has *your* gg-uncle or hometown somewhere in their tree, that still doesn't mean that it's not her match.

After I had one parent test here, I discovered that many of my "obvious" connections with leaf hints weren't possible because they were actually DNA connections to the other side of the family. My Dad could have easily said, "Hey, my wife is getting all of these matches to MY family!"

However, in a couple of those cases, I've gone on to find the match's actual DNA connection to my Mom. It just happens that sometimes some people have a strong paper trail link to one parent but a DNA connection to the other parent.

You didn't say whether you and your wife have similar backgrounds. If her parents are both immigrants from China and yours are both immigrants from Sweden, then I'd be concerned. Otherwise...

Over on another company's boards, one researcher has found that her husband is an unexpected DNA match to her first cousin. I believe she's gone on to work out the previously unknown connection. It really is a small world after all. :)

I'm not saying this is what's happening in your case. You may have an actual issue. But, from what you're describing, it sounds like your concern is that some of your wife's DNA matches have a close paper trail or geographical connection to you. That's not proof of a problem. There may *be* a problem, but that's not proof of one.

Don't forget that each match between two people involves considering over 2000 ancestors. (Over 1000 ancestors per person within autosomal range aka 10 generations.) Just because your wife matches someone with a link to your gg-uncle doesn't mean that's where her DNA connection to the match lies. It really could just be coincidence.

Like I said, my maternal grandmother and father here share over 100 matches of varying degrees of confidence. Over at another company, my parents both have the same person as one of their top matches, matching on completely different segments. I've sent I don't know how many messages to people here to say "Hey, that leaf hint from Ancestry can't be to our DNA connection because you are shown as a DNA match to my Dad instead of my Mom."

So, again, Ancestry customer service is probably going to be an unsatisfying experience unless you can give them some hard evidence (segment information) that your wife is not a genetic match to her matches. But, no harm in asking them! After all, they do make mistakes sometimes. I've only mentioned all of the above because your situation doesn't necessarily sound unusual, and I don't want you to be frustrated if Ancestry customer service doesn't scurry to "fix" it. :)

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 12:22PM GMT
Classification: Query
On one of the other threads he's posted this issue to I asked for clarification on what he's actually seeing and afterward I took a quick look at his tree. Assuming I'm reviewing the correct spouse I see ancestors from both he and the spouse who were born in neighboring counties in Tennessee. That could account for some DNA overlap.

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 1:24PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 25 Jun 2013 1:26PM GMT
You also have to take into account the confidence level. Duplicate matches with 95% confidence should raise an eyebrow, but not as much with the very low confidence ones. They could be some shared IBS segments which are causing these to appear.

Again, if ancestry is listening, without a way for us to know why you think something is a match, you are going to get speculations like this. It doesn't need to be a fancy graphical chromosome browser - just a list of the matching segments is enough.

David Mc

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 1:46PM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks Shari for the thoughtful reply. I will have to use GEDmatch as you suggest whenever possible. Perhaps others will use the surname search on their matches to verify that this is not happening in their additional kits. I hope it is just a glitch that happened to me. I believe that, I will probably have a hard time with Ancestry.com, and I dont blame anyone for discounting me, but I spent several hours last night searching for my other lines in her "matches" and everyone I searched for showed up. These are various lines spanning different geographical areas. it hardly seems probable that they are all also matches on her tree. Perhaps I am missing something here, but why would she have a match to several Pilkinton lines that have not shown up in my matches? I have researched this line for decades now and there is no trail that leads to her family. This is not a common name. If my wife and I were actually genetically related, then it seems as if the Pilkintons would at least show on both of our matches, but I have some of my Pilkinton lines matched to me on my matches and the other Pilkintons matched to her matches. Then add to this the fact of several of my other lines (uncommon names) also show up in her matches. I know most will chalk it up to our lines intersecting somewhere, however at this point I am convinced that it has to do with a computer program problem on the website. Some weird things have been happening. Remember when the DNA leaf hints lists dissappeared for several days?

Re: If you Administer more than one test - please check for duplicates

Posted: 25 Jun 2013 2:45PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 25 Jun 2013 2:46PM GMT
James,

I can't remember if this was mentioned, but when you find these people who match are they actually descended from the person who took the DNA test or are they just in their tree? There are people here with huge trees that include many people (in some cases most people) who are not related to the DNA test taker other than by marriage. I'm also not sure exactly what the new surname search is looking at. If it looks at everyone in the tree then that could be an issue.

Instead of using ancestry's new surname search, I suggest you using Jeff's chrome extension. I used that to get a count of exactly how many users/tests were in common with the 4 tests that I manage. Based on that I haven't seen the type of thing you see. My wife and mother are from totally different backgrounds, and there is no overlap other than a few very low confidence ones which probably aren't real.

David Mc
per page

Find a board about a specific topic