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Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

Posted: 22 Oct 2005 7:44PM GMT
Classification: Query
Under Canadian law, there is no such thing as a Metis or Métis Status Card.

The cards that are available merely show that a person has been accepted for membership in one or another of the various Metis associations.

Those organizations are ALL organized under the provisions of the Societies Act (or its equivalent in various provinces). They are Non-Profit Social organizations, not much diffetrent from the Masonic Lodges, the Elks, the Rotary Clubs, Soroptimist or Toastmasters.

The cards issued by those organizations do not confer any legal rights at all. They just show that a person is am member of that particular organization.

And even if they did confer any rights, no person that is not a Canadian citizen/resident could possibly benefit from having such a card.

There have already been cases of American Citizens attempting to hunt without a license in Canada. They were arrested, their weapons were confiscated and their "Métis Status" was absolutely meaningless!

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

Posted: 22 Oct 2005 10:50PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 8 Jul 2006 6:17PM GMT
Hi Lynton, You are correct in saying that a Metis card does not confer any legal, or territorial rights.... at this point in time.When and if the Canadian Government chooses to recognize the rights of Metis individuals or communities, I would imagine that the Govt. would issue an "official" card at that time. Who knows what the future will hold. If Native people in Canada and here in the US cannot get federal recognition, where does that leave us?? I realize that a Metis card does not hold water here in the US. I have specialized in traditional Metis beadwork and crafts, as well as fine art for more than 25 years. Even though I have been able to sell and exhibit my work in the US without any problem, it would be beneficial to have a Metis card as a confirmation of my work as a Metis artist. The same would go for a Native American artist. Due to the Native American Arts and Crafts Act, Native artists and traditional crafts people must show a Tribal Card in order to exhibit or sell ANYTHING. That is the law. Just one more discriminatory act by the government which leaves out any non-status Natives or any tribes that are not federally recognized. Fortunately, the US govt. has not targeted us yet. Little by little, hopefully things will change. But it will take time.

Arvis

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

jan (View posts)
Posted: 23 Oct 2005 7:12PM GMT
Classification: Query
I agree fully with both of you regarding Metis Status in USA and Canada and is one of the reasons why I've not pushed for my own card. I was only looking at the possibility of the future for my kids, that should the US-Gov. open their eyes to other native cultures, that maybe after I pass on, my kids might get lucky and benefit. Sad to say, with the road our country has gone thus far, I see nothing for my own kids' future.
But whats most important is who I am and who my children are blood wise. A Metis Card isn't going to change my life or benefit me or anyone for that matter because our country does not recognize the American METIS. I've always felt we are the forgotten people.
I also do native crafts, but I can't sell them. My father is 3/4 Chippewa and even though I am native and am not on a roll, which I do not believe is right, there would be cosequences for me. American laws are another issue. There is much to be said.

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

Lynton Stewart (View posts)
Posted: 23 Oct 2005 11:30PM GMT
Classification: Query
If your father is 3/4 Chippewa, then you would qualify for tribal entollment. Being on one side of the US border or the other makes no difference in that matter.

But can you prove that? Can you prove that your father is 3/4 Chippewa? If you can, then you could easily enroll yourself.

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

jan (View posts)
Posted: 24 Oct 2005 4:14AM GMT
Classification: Query
I have plenty of records showing chippewa ancestry going way back. I have TM Indian land records in which was taken from under my grandfather and ggrandparents feet by the government back in the year of 1915...but nobody wants too deal with it. My grandmother who was a HOULE, was said to be adopted into the TM Tribe by the TM Council, but TM wants to play games with me by telling me it is me who needs to pull the roll number before they will consider enrolling me and my family. There are plenty of records in my posession to prove who I am.
Is that enough proof? You hit a sore spot with me.

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

Lynton Stewart (View posts)
Posted: 24 Oct 2005 5:16PM GMT
Classification: Query
You can obtain copies of the roll through Inter-Library Loan. Do that, and look up the enrollment number of your grandmother.

The tribe is absolutely correct, it is up to YOU to prove your eligibility. It is not theirs to go our searching for possible tribal members.

You may have a problem however, if you are correct about your grandmother being "adopted" into the tribe. If that was an informal or honorary "adoption", then her children would NOT be tribal members.

In any case, it is up to you to provide the tribe with the necessary documentation to prove your case. Otherwise, they are perfectly correct in refusing to recognize you.

Oh yes. Being Métis is NOT merely a substitute for not being Indian. It is not some other form of "Indian Status" given out as a consolation prize for those that can not prove their entitlement to be on the rolls of a tribe. Métis are a seperate and distinct group of aboriginal people, very different from Indians.

The fact that you may have Indian and European ancestry does not in any way make you Métis. It makes you mixed blood, but not Métis.

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

ng representation by Meti David Lowe (View posts)
Posted: 1 Aug 2006 12:23PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: lowe, leadfoot
I have read, with interest, the conversation re the Metis Status Card. It is correct to say that it has no legal bearing in Canada. What is absolutely incorrect is to suggest that "Metis" is not recognized in Canada in a legal manner. The 1982 Constitution Act clearly defines Aboriginal People to be First Nations, Metis and Inuit. This entenches the legal framework of Metis status in Canada. What is now required is strong representation by Metis organizations, such as OMAA and MNO to promote the rights which should be inherent in this legal text within the Constitution Act. In order to do that, the organizations require backing (membership) to provide the funds necessary. So, if you want to see your Metis rights finally achieved, then join an organization which will fight for your rights. That is what a Metis Status card s all about.

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

Lynton Stewart (View posts)
Posted: 1 Aug 2006 5:50PM GMT
Classification: Query
Absoultely correct in essence.

The card itself has no "legal bearing"and neither does membership in any Métis organization, other than any benefits the organization may provide.

However, the Métis people in Canada certainly have a legalmeaning. BUT, the government had maintained that the Métis people enjoyed no aboriginal rights, believing that all such "rights" had been surrendered with the "acceptance" of script. It maintained that policy right up till the issuance of the Powley decision.

The Métis organizations currently provide membership in organizations that are set up under the societies act. Such membership is essentially the same as belonging to the Masonic Orders, the Elks or any other fraternal organization.

That may well change over time, if and when, real rights and privledges are negotiated for the Métis people.

Unfortunately, some Métis organizations are attempting to control who is and who is not Métis legally, excluding the very people that funded the Powley case. The MNO is attempting to become the sole decision maker as to who is Métis, nation wide.

Unfortunately, the government on both the federal and the provincial levels, appears to be accepting the MNO's positions. If that ever becomes law, almost half of the Métis people of Canada will be excluded from receiving any recognition and/or benefits from the government.

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

David (View posts)
Posted: 1 Aug 2006 6:23PM GMT
Classification: Query
Very well put. I am a member of OMAA and know many Ontario members of both organizations, from the ground, up. As a senior government worker, I see every day how those decisions have impacted on Metis and see the many opportunites out there for Metis to effect change to those decisions. Government recognition will come and you are right, we must work to ensure that recognition is of all Metis organizations, not just the MNO, not just OMAA. We need to unite as a common front and push our agenda as has the First Nations people and as has the Inuit. United we stand, divided we fall....its not just an old saying or words in some '60's song..it is and should be, a mantra.

Re: Metis "Status" Cards mean NOTHING!

Lynton Stewart (View posts)
Posted: 1 Aug 2006 10:08PM GMT
Classification: Query
Yes, the organizations should re-unite. Both O.M.A.A., and MNC and its provincial organizations came out of the same group. C.A.P. was the parent of the Métis Nation of Canada, and is still the overall organization of which O.M.A.A. is a member.

I am also an O.M.A.A. member. Ironically, government recognition, Métis rights, etc. will NOT benefit me or my siblings. You see, we were all once Canadian citizens, but under a provision of the 1947 Citizenship act, each of us lost our Canadian citizenship on our 24th birthdays. The government has not yet allowed our category of former citizens to resume our citizenship.

I want it back so badly, you wouldn't believe. But, so far there is no bill toallow ALL former Canadian citizens that lost their citizenship automatically, to resume that citizenship upon application.

It would be one thing, if this had been done because of a court order, or we had been given the right to appeal the decision, but our citizenship was just stripped away without any notice at all.

Frankly, I believe that if you are born in Canada, or to a Canadian citizen anywhere in the world, then you are a Canadian. But, Canada, unlike every other western country, does not recognize that concept.

Oh well, maybe before my 70th birthday, I'll be able to "come home again".
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