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Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

David (View posts)
Posted: 25 Dec 2003 9:38AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Parker
I am a descendant of Joseph Parker who had a son David Stout Parker born in September 1841. Joseph Parkers brother was Charles Parker whose son was Judge Joel Parker who was Governor of New Jersey and died 1888. The family were from Monouth NJ. Joseph had another son, William Parker also known as Rich Billy.

I would appreciate any information about the family especially Joseph Parker. David Stout Parker travelled to the Pacific Islands and became a successful trader with businesses in San Francisco but died in Samoa aged 68 in 1909.

Thanks David

Re: Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

James Parker Wollner (View posts)
Posted: 5 Feb 2004 9:04PM GMT
Classification: Query
Dear David,
I am the grandson of James Jennings Parker, son of Winfield Scott Parker who is the brother of Joel, Anthony, John H., Newell, David S,.Jeremiah, Josephine, Cena, Mary E., and Abby Bennet nee Parker. If you need further info please contact me at your convenience.
JPW

Re: Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

Pat (View posts)
Posted: 6 Feb 2004 6:17PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: applegate-bennett-clayton-cowdrick-frazee-marks-patterson-reynolds-woolley-vanarsdale-tice
Hi, Looking for the family of Hannah Parker that married William H. Bennett

1860 Holmdel Twp. Monmouth CO. New Jersey
67 63 William H. Bennett age 21 Farm laborer N.J.
Wife: Hannah (Parker) age 20 Keeping house N.J.
1. Son William H. age 1mos. N.J.
2. Caroline Bray age 18 N.J

Thanks for any help you can give me.

Re: Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

Posted: 18 Jan 2013 4:55AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi David

I am the greatgrand daughter of David Stout Parker, there are 100s of us in NZ,Aus and Samoa which is where gr8granpa's grave is.
Earlier this month we had a Parker Family REunion in Nz. We hold another in 2 yrs time as we are a very very big family.


Maria

Re: Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

Posted: 22 Mar 2015 4:28AM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi there, Pls im heading to New Jersey to visit where my family origins. Pls id love to get info as to where David Stout Parker was born in nj. Im a great grandson of David Stout Parker. Im planning to be in nj around the 3rd of April. Looking forward to hearing back from you

Re: Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

Posted: 22 Mar 2015 9:47AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 22 Mar 2015 9:50AM GMT
Surnames: Parker, Stout
Am not related. But you can get in touch with both the Monmouth County and Ocean County Historical Societies and ask them to help direct you to landmarks associated with David Stout Parker and his family. David was born in Forked River, Ocean County and the family were from Monmouth County; and also had ties to Shrewsbury, NJ. Do post and/or check out the Ocean County, and Parker and Stout message boards as well. Links to both Societies for you:

http://www.monmouthhistory.org/Sections-read-65.html
http://www.oceancountyhistory.org/

And here is an excerpt from a report on a historical building and areas that Parker had some connections to:

Source: WRITTEN HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA
Historic American Buildings Survey
National Park Service
Department of Interior
Washington, D.C. 20013-7127

Town of Forked River
New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail
Intersection of U.S. Highway 9 and
County Road 614
Forked River
Ocean County
New Jersey

New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail, Intersection of U.S. Highway 9 and County Road
614, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

Significance: Forked River was established in the mid-eighteenth century and is representative of
the typical bay town, often referred to as the "Barnegat Bay resorts." The villages
fronting the bay were established communities relying on the products of forest trade
and sea long before the railroad brought resort trade. Forked River rivaled
neighboring Waretown and Barnegat for the title of best fishing and gunning grounds,
as well as supported various industries, including saltworks, sawmills, iron
production, game farms, charcoal production and mercantile trade.

History: Considered by some the fishing headquarters for Barnegat Bay, fisherman who visited
the Forked River area throughout the summer marveled over the large numbers of
wreakfish, sheepshead and kingfish, while the gunners arriving in the winter and
spring expected a plentiful supply of teal, broad-bills, blacks, red-heads and other
birds. The quail, rabbits, coons and foxes frequenting the woods were also fair game.
According to Kobbe, this preference for Forked River was based on the town's hotel,
the Lafayette House, located on the north branch of the Forked River. Not only did
the Lafayette offer a plentiful supply of food at early hours, but also quick, efficient
stage transportation directly from boat to hotel. Of the three hotels that once stood
on the main stage line, only the Olde Forked River House remains. According to
tradition, Captain Joshua Huddy stopped at the inn on his way through the area.
Since enlarged to include five dining rooms, the popular restaurant still attracts
motorists heading towards Long Beach Island.

Though the bay provided the primary means of subsistence for early settlers, and of
recreation for later tourists, other natural resources influenced the town's initial urban
development. The Forked River supported various industries, such as, Samuel
Warden's saltworks, established near the Forked River port in 1743. The river also
powered numerous nineteenth century sawmills such as the Joseph Holmes Mill, once
operating between Mill and Parker Streets on the north branch of the fork. Houses
were built along the river and near Mill Pond. In 1810, John Lacey completed a
$10,000.00 road that ran parallel to the river and connected his iron works in Bamber
with the docks. Lacey, the revolutionary war general for whom Lacey township was
named, supervised "a forge with four fires, tow hammers, stamping mill, etc., and
eight good dwelling houses." Today, Lacey Drive bypasses the town's commercial
district, crossing Route 9 close to the state game farm.

When iron production was at its height, the state game farm was known as the
Woodmansee estate and contained two eighteenth century houses, a vernacular
colonial farmhouse and a two and one-half story Federal style home. There was also
an assortment of nineteenth and twentieth century sheds with pheasant weather vanes,
indicative of the estate's conversion into a game farm in 1912. A 1970 newspaper
article reported that over 10,000 people annually visited the 35,000 ring-necked
pheasants produced each year. Today, the birds are cared for by juvenile offenders
who live on the property.

A variety of other industries were practiced in the early days of Forked River as well.
For fifty years, beginning in 1825, Captain David Stout Parker ran a local store and
sailed ships loaded with pine lumber to New York. With the proceeds from his
mercantile trade, he purchased the "Greenwood tract" of land, where he produced
charcoal for inland markets. Parker was also instrumental in extending the railroad
from Toms River to Waretown. Though the lumber and charcoal resources were
depleted by the 1860s, Forked River's tourist trade increased during the second half
of the century. Captain Parker's brother, Joseph "Old Sheriff' Parker established the
Lafayette House in 1857.

By 1895, Forked River was the largest city in the township with a population of about
500. Though it boasted "Methodist and Presbyterian churches, a Universalist Church
Society, a graded public school and a lodge of the Knights of the Golden Eagle," the
town was most famous for its salt water fishing and cat yachts. Since the
construction of the first nuclear power plant in New Jersey, the Oyster Creek Nuclear
Generating station outside Forked River, area residents have been even more
concerned with water. The 1969 power plant brought the increased residential and
commercial development of Routes 9 and 72, the death offish and the threat of
nuclear disaster.

Prepared by: Sarah Allaback
HABS Historian
Summer 1991


Re: Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

Posted: 25 Mar 2015 4:07AM GMT
Classification: Query

Re: Joseph Parker son of Thomas Parker and Sarah Stout Parker

Posted: 25 Mar 2015 6:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Parker, Stout
Very interesting website and heartwarming story of family history, well-preserved for posterity. And nice blog of yours (from your User Name).
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