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Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 31 Jul 2009 11:50PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: SCHIRUSKA, CHYRUSKA
Hi everyone, was wondering if anyone can help me. I have a page of a book written in Schwetzingen, Germany in 1939 chronicling the Catholic families of that town over the prior 200 years. One family I'm interested in is listed as SHIRUSKA and says the oginial name was CHYRUSKA from Grudlitz, Bohmen. I can find no record of this town and don't know where it might be. If anyone has heard of it or might think they know where it is, or even if anyone has come across these surnames, please let me know. Thanks.

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 3 Aug 2009 2:38PM GMT
Classification: Query
Hi, as you already mentioned there is no Grudlitz in Bohemia. However there are several villages with the name Grudlitz (most often translated to Czech as Hradiste). Are you sure Grudlitz is the correct version of the name? If there is A instead of U, there is quite many possibilities to be checked.

Blanka Lednická
Need professional genealogist's help with reading online records from Czech Archives? Want to do a research in Bohemia and Moravia? Don't hesitate to contact me.

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 4 Aug 2009 12:56AM GMT
Classification: Query
The book says Grudlitz, but since they were transcribed from handwritten records, it's possible it was spelled with an A. At this point I haven't seen the original records so I have no way of knowing.

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 5 Aug 2009 6:45PM GMT
Classification: Query
Could I suggest that what you are looking for is Gradlitz, nowadays Choustnikovo Hradiste, approx. 100km ENE of Prague? Also with the family name, my linguistic skills do not embrace Czech but I have a friend in Iowa who is married to a Hruska of Czech descent. Is it possible that this is a simplified, Americanised, version of the name you are trying to trace? Hope my suggestions are useful.

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 6 Aug 2009 1:55AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks for the response. I guess it's possibly the town you mentioned, but I'll have to do more research. I know I have very little to go on at this point. I think though that the Grudlitz/Gradlitz the Chyruska family was from may have been in an area with a large German population. I'm only guessing, but since they moved to German territory, and the wife's maiden name was listed as Frieblin (possibly Friebolin?) I think they may have had German ancestry.

Is it also possible that Hruska is an Americanized version of the surname, but again at this point I have very little information and know vertually nothing about Czech surnames/history. All I know is that apprently the name was spelled Chyruska when the family lived in Bohmen, but changed it to Shiruska when they settled in German. So Hruska certainly sounds like another possible variant. I'll have to find out more.

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 6 Aug 2009 11:06AM GMT
Classification: Query
Could I suggest you try to get some basic knowledge about central European history, I think it would help you a lot - don't think you have to get a Ph.D in the subject! Over the centuries there was a lot of German settlement in "Bohemia" (present day Czech Republic). In some areas where Germans settled they would give a name locally to a place which already had a Czech name and would use this name, at least amongst themselves, even if the original name was retained officially. In some places if they settled where there was not an established town they just named it and after the Germans left the Czechs gave it a new Czech name. This is a very potted explanation, just to give you an example of how complicated place names can be. However, if any place had a German name - and Gradlitz is most decidedly German - that place would have had a large German speaking population. The fact that both names still appear on official websites points to the fact that it was a "German" town. Also, the fact that someone had a Czech name would not necessarily mean he was fully Czech, he could well have had a German mother, father possibly died, closer to German family, married a German woman, moved back to Germany. Just one theory. Frieblin is certainly Germanic. I would say your family is almost certainly German and just had a Czech name introduced into the family at some point. It happens. I am as English as they come but my maiden name was pure Spanish - where it came from no one knows.
As to Hruska. I do not know any Czech but if the spelling Ch in Chyruska is pronounced more like "Sh" it could well have been changed to that for ease of spelling and pronounciation in Germany. "Ch" in German is a very guttural sound, like the "ch" in Scottish "loch" and it may have been an attempt to preserve the Czech pronounciation. Hope these ideas help a bit.

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 6 Aug 2009 11:20AM GMT
Classification: Query
I just had another idea. If you look up dastelefonbuch.de (they have an English page if you do not know enough German) you will find there are just 75 entries for Hruska. If any of these seem to be in the area you are talking about it might be worth writing and asking if they know anything about name changes. If there is no one in the area you want it might still be worth picking out a few and writing a polite letter. It would only cost a stamp or two and could provide a lead, if it doesn't you have not lost much. Good luck

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 7 Aug 2009 12:27AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks for the info. I've already looked up a little on the history of Choustnikovo Hradiste and think there is a pretty good chance this is where the "Grudliz" (which was probably a misread of Gradlitz) that Chyruska family came from. Undobutedly there was some Czech blod somewhere in there to have such a name, but also probably mixed with a lot of German. This is interesting because even though it's from centuries ago, this is the first time I've encountered any possible non-German ancestry from my mother's side. I remember how when I was a child my mother always told me her family was "100% of German origin". That is indeed interesting how your maiden name was of Spanish origin, yet you are English.

Thanks for the lead on dastelefonbuch.de. I will certainly check it out. Thankfully they do have an English page since my German is about as fluent as my Czech!

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 7 Aug 2009 10:58AM GMT
Classification: Query
Do remember that there have been serious political and social tensions between Germans and Czechs for yonks which could have led to trying to distance one side from the other. Also Bohemia was not part of Germany, it was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, although many migrants probably came originally from Germany proper, which could have made at least some of them want to insist they were "proper" Germans. Try googling Germans in Bohemia - I think you will find much of interest to you.

Re: Seeking 18th century town of Grudlitz, Bohmen

Posted: 10 Feb 2013 6:34PM GMT
Classification: Query
I got a fact, that makes Gradlitz/Choustnikovo Hradiste even more reasonable as it already is. Above you mentioned the name "Frieblin". The ending "in" in names in german language of the 18th century says, that it is a female person (for example in the czech language you would say "frieblova"). The familyname is "Friebel". This name was widespread in Gradlitz/Choustnikovo Hradiste in former times. In the "soupis poddanych podle viry z roku 1651" - list of souls from 1651 - I found two households with the name "Frybel", which is another form of writing the same name.
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