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GRUENWALD/SCHEFFNER

GRUENWALD/SCHEFFNER

Posted: 15 Apr 2004 5:34AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 29 Jun 2006 7:58PM GMT
Surnames: SCHEFFNER/GRUENWALD
Is anyone else out there researching an Anna Scheffner who was born circa 1832 and came to America with her parents David and Mary and her sister Caroline (who married David Gruenwald)? Anna is still single in the Oct. 1950 census.
OR Is anyone researching David and Mary Scheffner/Scheffler/Schaffner? David was last seen at age 72 in the 1870 census; whereas his wife mary was last seen in the 1850 census at age 55. These are all in town of Mequon, Ozaukee Co.

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald in Milwaukee's German newspapers, March 1878.

Posted: 28 Jun 2013 3:48PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 29 Jun 2013 6:50PM GMT
Surnames: Grünewald Gruenewald Scheffner
There are detailed articles in Milwaukee's German papers from March 3 to March 6, 1878 concerning a Mr. "Scheffler" later tentatively id'd as Mr. David Scheffner (he'd been in the lake for about 4 weeks and difficult to identify, but missed by his family in Mequon for about that long). Names listed in the inquest transcript, along with their testimony, are David and Caroline (Scheffner) Grünewald, their sons Wm. & Frank Grünewald, and various neighbors and other acquaintances of David Scheffner. The name is first reported as "Scheffler".

There are likely articles in the 1878 English language papers, and the original transcript may be in the collection of the Milwaukee County Historical Society.

"Milwaukee's German Newspapers; an index of death notices and related items" (1844-1950).
Gary Rebholz, compiler/editor
Milwaukee Wis.
gary.rebholz@gmail.com
Indexing Milwaukee's German newspapers continuously since 2007... helping to access our historic German-American culture, not data.

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald in Milwaukee's German newspapers, March 1878.

Posted: 23 Feb 2014 6:29AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Schaeffner
Bless you Gary, thank you so much! I too, search the Schaeffner family, as David was my gggg grandfather. I would love to search these papers myself for I am saddened to learn of his passing in this manner. I also hope to find out what happened to his wife, and there was another daughter Eva who is not mentioned past the ship's lists. Anna is actually Johanna, and was my ggg-grandmother. She also had an untimely passing - after the birth of twins (they survived) and left 7 children all under the age of 11. She was 37. I am drawn to their story and hope to find out more! Thank you so much for suggesting such a wonderful resource! I live up north, so as soon as it warms up a bit I will be on my way to Madison! Thanks again!

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald in Milwaukee's German newspapers, March 1878.

Posted: 23 Feb 2014 5:48PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 23 Feb 2014 5:49PM GMT
Surnames: Scheffner Schäffner Grünewald
The coverage of the coroner's cases in the local German papers is surprisingly detailed for a couple of decades - they literally published the full transcript of many inquests, and I've indexed them. Many coroner's cases are indexed & archived at the Milwaukee County Historical Society.
David Schaeffner was found in the lake off Milwaukee Co., so the local coroner handled it. I don't know what was published in the English language papers in Milwaukee or Ozaukee County.
Use the site "19th Century U.S. Newspapers" for a search there. A different range of papers are available through "NewspaperARCHIVE" which is accessible to all library-card-carrying Wisconsinites through BadgerLink.

All the spelling variations found in this thread, Schaeffner Schäffner, etc., are found in "Milwaukee's German Newspapers; an index of death notices and related items" (1844-1950).
Sadly, the index is not available in Madison 8-(

Gary Rebholz, originator/compiler/editor, Milwaukee Wis.
gary.rebholz@gmail.com
Indexing Milwaukee's German newspapers continuously since 2007...

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald in Milwaukee's German newspapers, March 1878.

Posted: 26 Feb 2014 9:14AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you! I had thought to go to Madison because of the historical society but could just as easily go to Milwaukee. I actually wanted to go back to Mequon when the weather warms up a little, I am currently in southern Ashland county here in Butternut up north. I had searched for the Schaeffner's for a long time, finally finding them in Mequon, through the Gruenewald's. I am a distance learning student at UW Superior so also have access to the UW system libraries. I hear UW Milwaukee has a good one. I was very intrigued to learn more about the family, as the Schaeffner's story so far at least, seems so sad for a family that came so far for a new life. Am I understanding correctly that the index is available in Milwaukee? I have many genealogical reasons to come back to spend time there as well. I am so pleased that there is so much available to search. The family has been quite a mystery to me until recently. There is much to be found on the Gruenewald's but hardly anything at all on the Schaeffner's. How exciting it must be to read all of those old newspapers! I imagine it gets tedious at times, but just reading about day to day life back then must really be neat.

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald & Busch in Milwaukee's German newspapers 1870s

Posted: 2 Aug 2016 1:35PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Scheffner Busch Grünewald Gruenewald
So ... as you've posted on Facebook, you now have the coroner's report, and family testimony found there. As I wrote, some or all of the Grünewald testimony was transcribed for the German language papers, but you wouldn't need it.
I'll have to look at that again -- they may have serialized the testimony during that week, and I overlooked the other days.

Another early Scheffner name that would be contemporary with David is Amelie (Busch) Scheffner, and the family death notices published for her by Eduard Scheffner.

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald & Busch in Milwaukee's German newspapers 1870s

Posted: 2 Aug 2016 9:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
I am actually at the Salzmann library right now, but have not found the listing. If it is not needed, then that is OK as I do have the coroner's report. I had just hoped there would be some mention of if he was a widower at the time, as we are searching for his wife who dropped off the books after the 1850 (and possibly 1855 state) census. We assume she died, but have found no record thus far. I have searched all the listings here as well but do not find her either. However, I did come across a Senne connection that I am going to pursue so this was not a wasted trip..It was definitely worth the search! I will check into that other listing that you mentioned. So far we know of no such person in our lineage but it absolutely never hurts to follow a lead. They may be connected somehow, thank you. :)

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald & Busch in Milwaukee's German newspapers 1870s

Posted: 2 Aug 2016 10:04PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 5 Aug 2016 9:55PM GMT
Surnames: Unknown Scheffner Scheffler Schessel Schöffner
Wow. That reporting was a mess, with the story unfolding from March 4-7 in 2 papers (4, if you count weekly editions). As the details come to light, the first brief article is about someone finding an "unknown male" in Lake Michigan near "North Point" (presumably, the light house), near Milwaukee. David Scheffner's surname then ranges in the reporting from Scheffler Schessel Scheffner and Schöffner.

This is a good example why actually looking at a range of dates in an index is worthwhile to catch name variations for the same person -- spellings all come together in the index when chosing a week's worth of dates.

My memory from scanning through the articles is that besides actual quotes from Caroline's testimony, there is testimony by her husband and 3-4 sons, neighbors, barkeepers, hoteliers, friends, etc.

But all the reporting comes from the court record.

Have you found a church record? Some Protestant pastors, in my family research experience, would've listed a deceased wife, birthplace, etc.

Re: Scheffner & Grünewald & Busch in Milwaukee's German newspapers 1870s

Posted: 2 Aug 2016 10:33PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have not found any church records so far. The family does not appear to have been regular churchgoers from what we can gather. The children were baptized, but never confirmed, etc. Death and marriage records found in civil records but not church, and things like that. A cousin descended from one of the other sisters thinks there is a possibility David Schaeffner was Jewish, I can't remember where she originally got that from. I will check the index again under those different spellings. It would be interesting to see how the paper wrote it all up.
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