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Thurnwald/Turnvald/Turnwald/Turnvalt

Thurnwald/Turnvald/Turnwald/Turnvalt

Posted: 10 Oct 2012 3:53AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Thurnwald/Turnvald/Turnwald/Turnvalt/ Krasnohorska/Pechova
My Grandpa, Josef Thurnwald born 26/02/1920 - lived in Klatovy, West Bohemia, Czech Republic. Came to Australia and changed his surname to Thurnwald (Unsure on the original spelling please see above). He hasn't shared much information with us about his family. I don't know his parents/siblings names. But we do know that his Aunt was Eliska Krasnohorska (born Alzbeta Pechova)- we know that as he insisted my middle name be Eliska. Could anyone give me some ideas on where I might find information on my ancestors?

Re: Thurnwald/Turnvald/Turnwald/Turnvalt

Posted: 10 Oct 2012 4:21AM GMT
Classification: Query

Re: Thurnwald/Turnvald/Turnwald/Turnvalt

Posted: 10 Oct 2012 4:40AM GMT
Classification: Query
Parrish books for Klatovy http://actapublica.eu/matriky/plzen/?akce=hledat&hl_sign...

You won´t find your grandpa here, books for year 1920 are not in archives yet, but perhaps you could find some of his family.

Parrish books for Plzeň (that´s where Eliška´s family lived for while) http://actapublica.eu/matriky/plzen/?akce=hledat&hl_sign... If you´re lucky, you could find a Thurnwald/Pechová wedding there.

Re: Thurnwald/Turnvald/Turnwald/Turnvalt

Posted: 10 Oct 2012 10:35PM GMT
Classification: Query
I would suggest that the original spelling of this name was Thurnwald. In earlier days in German "th" was used instead of "t" with exactly the same pronounciation as "T" - e.g. "das Thal" (the valley) nowadays "das Tal" (the valley). In addition the "d" at the end of a word has a much sharper sound than the English "d" and at the end of a word sounds more like a "t". The variation in the spellings probably came because he was trying to simplify things in an English speaking country where these points were not known. Although he was born in Czechslovakia, which was created in 1919 from parts of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, there were a lot of German speaking people there at that time and the name is obviously German not Czech. The Czech Republic only came into being in the 1990s when Slovakia split from Czechoslovakia and two republics, Czech and Slovakian were created. Hope this helps a bit.
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