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First documented collateral family in Va or NC

First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 10 Aug 2010 1:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have a question. What was the first family relation to the Jernigans in either Virginia or North Carolina and what documentation proves this relationship? I have seen researchers claim some of these families -- Moore, Blackman to name two -- but I have not seen the documentation of this. I have books with abstracts of some early documents (land patents in Va and misc documents in Albemarle, NC) and the earliest documented family I can find is the Jones family of Bertie County, NC. And even then only that Ann Jones was a daughter of Henry Jernigan whose will was probated in Bertie Precinct in 1736. Does anyone know the documentation which proves earlier relationships and what is it? Thanks so much.

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 10 Aug 2010 3:52PM GMT
Classification: Query
For the record I have abstracts of documents showing the Jernigans in Nansemond County, Virginia records in 1668 and the Jernigans in Chowan Precinct, Albemarle County, North Carolina records as early as possibly 1709. Tons of land records of Albemarle County, North Carolina show these Jernigans were definitely those of Nansemond County, Virginia. Often in the land conveyance records of early Chowan Precinct they are identified as being 'of Nansemond County, Virginia'. Often the other parties in the conveyances are also identified as being 'of Nansemond County, Virginia' as well.

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 16 Aug 2010 2:47PM GMT
Classification: Query
I was looking through Cavaliers and Pioneers and other books I have over the weekend and discovered something I didn't know. That the Nansemond River itself was once the dividing line between Warrisqueoc/Isle of Wight County and consecutively Elizabeth City County, then New Norfolk County, then Upper Norfolk County. At some point the dividing line was moved further west so that all of the Nansemond River was contained within the county but I haven't found when that was. In researching collateral families it is important to research records of Warrisqueoc/Isle of Wight; Elizabeth City; New Norfolk and Upper Norfolk as well as Nansemond County itself.

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 11 Mar 2012 1:24AM GMT
Classification: Query
I realize this comes well after you originally posted .. I'm still learning how to navigate through all that's in Ancestry.

I'm still in the early learning stages of all this, but I was looking through some of the records you talked about and would love to hear what else you've learned!

Thanks!

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 11 Mar 2012 5:39AM GMT
Classification: Query
I did find this in my copy of "British Roots of Maryland Families"

That John Jerningham, the son of Sir Henry Jerningham and Eleanor (Dacres?) married Ann Mary Moore in 1619 in England. She was the daughter of Sir Francis Moore, Barrister of Fawley, Berkshire, England. Ann Mary Moore's mother was Anne Twitty. John Jerningham died in 1636 when he was 38 years old.

His grandson, Sir Francis Jerningham, 3rd Baronet, was born about 1650. He married Anne Blount who was the daughter of Sir George Blount, 3rd Baronet. Anne Blount's mother was Mary Kirkham. Sir Francis Jerningham died on 16 August 1730 at age 80. He was buried at Cossey Church. If I remember correctly Cossey is in Norfolk, England. Sir Francis' wife, Anne Blount Jerningham was buried on 17 February 1735.

Their grandson, Henry Jerningham, emigrated from England to Maryland and settled in Somerset County there and raised his family there. He died sometime before 1773.

Both Moore and Blount are very common names in colonial Southern records. I don't know if the Moore and Blount families associated with the Jerninghams above are connected with the early American Moores and Blounts.

My copy of "Burke's Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England, Scotland and Ireland" has more about the Moores of Fawley, Berkshire.

It says that Sir Francis Moore married Anne Twitty, the daughter of William Twitty, Esq. of Boreham, Essex. Their daughter, Anne Moore is mentioned as having married John Jerningham, the eldest son of Sir Henry Jerningham, the 1st Baronet of Cossy Hall in Norfolk.

Other children of Sir Francis Moore and Anne Twitty were a son named William Moore whose wife's given name is unknown but her maiden name was Blount.

Another daughter of Sir Francis Moore and Anne Twitty was Elizabeth Moore who married Sir Richard Blount of Maple Durham, Oxford.

There is nothing in the entry about the Moores of Fawley, Berkshire which mentions any locations other than England.

I do find it interesting to find the Moores related to the Jerninghams in England and then to find Moores also as neighbors and relations to some of the earliest Jernigans who settled in Nansemond County, Virginia. But again I do not know if any of these Moores were related or it is just a very common name found in many places.

Ditto for the Blounts mentioned above. The Blounts were also very prominent in old Albemarle County, North Carolina and interrelated with many families there. Their descendants have become very prominent people in Southern history and several states have Blount counties named after them.

Other books by Burkes may have more info on all of the above families and their positions in the English aristocracy. Perhaps in some of those passages it might be mentioned that some of the family relocated to the American colonies?

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 11 Mar 2012 9:31PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Jernigan
I have some stories and 'documents' I've saved dealing with Jernigan family history (I tried to copy the link, but not sure I did it right: http://trees.ancestry.com), from their move from Denmark to England, and including much history and 31 generations.

A will for John Jernigan in 1733 (The second transcription and the inventory are on this website: http://home.att.net/~mboots/Jernigan_Homepage/XXII.htm.) in Bertie Prct. in N. Carolina, mentioning wife Temperance Jernagan (Surname is spelled several different ways in this one document), sons Henry, Thomas, George, James and David, who was left 20 shillings while all others were left land and such.

Info on Thomas' trip from England to N. America (Maryland) and back to England, then his move with his family back to Va. - "Historical Southern Families, Vol. IV" by John Bennett Boddie. And another showing where Thomas and family shipped by way of Bermuda to Va.

You probably already have all these .. I can't figure out how to send them to you without copying and pasting, which would be REALLY long, but you seem much more adept at doing this than I am. If you don't have these and you can tell me how to send them to you I'll be more than happy to do that.




Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 11 Mar 2012 10:30PM GMT
Classification: Query
I think I've seen the 31 generations report even recently when I was searching online for something else. It is long and complete but I think has some errors. I also think I've seen the original microfilm of John Jernigan's will as well on the North Carolina Dept of Archives website. I'm not familiar with the book by Boddie. Other Jernigan researchers may be familiar with it. My understanding is that the Thomas Jernigan who settled originally in Maryland is not the same as the one who sailed from England to Bermuda. Although it's likely they were relatives and knew each other well. I've always wondered what happened to the one who ended up in Bermuda. Did he stay and raise a family there or did he return to England? What is more interesting about that Thomas is that his ship's (Truelove) Passenger List (available in my copy of Hotten's "Original Lists of Persons of Quality") there is also listed Henry More age 19 and Hugh Wentworth age 44. Both More (Moore) and Wentworth are families related to the Jernigans/Jerninghams of Somerleyton and Cossey halls in England. Were these passengers also related to the Thomas Jernigan they were travelling with to Bermuda? And did they also stay there and raise their families? The Bermuda connection seems to still be a mystery to this day. Probably very few documents have survived which would reveal the true story. I have considered the possibility that the voyage may have had political reasons. Thomas Wentworth the Earl of Strafford was at the height of his power in England in 1635 and was making tons of enemies as well. He was probably the second most powerful man in England next to King Charles and was possibly even more powerful in reality than the king. In 1641 Wentworth's luck and influence ran out. Parliament impeached him and the king reluctantly signed an execution warrant. Wentworth was beheaded shortly thereafter. I have wondered if these events had any effect on the Jernigans and their Wentworth relatives. There are several Wentworth families (all seemingly related) in my copy of Burke's Extinct & Dormant Baronetcies, etc but I don't find references to the Jernigans, Jerninghams, Moores, Blounts or other collateral families. Again it is possible that other volumes of Burke's may have more info on these families.

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 12 Mar 2012 12:01AM GMT
Classification: Query
I was talking to a friend today, whose mother has done extensive research on their family and she was talking about the Bermuda connections as well, and had found a way to get quite detailed info. I'll ask her and let you know.

I'm still bouncing between the stories about Thomas "the Immigrant" JERNIGAN .. they're good stories, but it looks like that the Thomas that initally came over and landed in Maryland couldn't be the same one that came to Va. via Bermuda, as the Thomas that went through Bermuda was only 21 and although Thomas that sailed into Maryland was only there about a yr, he went back to England for 30+ yrs before leaving with his wife, Ann, and their 3 sons, Thomas, Henry and John .. the daughter (Margaret) was born in Va and is probably the one that married William Moore, Jr, whose land butted up against Thomas's .. so while I'm thinking the one who came through Bermuda could've been the others' son, one of the stories says they all came back to america together, so .. ?

More digging .. and brain knots! lol

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 12 Mar 2012 4:44AM GMT
Classification: Query
I don't know how much research has been done on the English side of records. I am presuming (perhaps wrongly) that all of Burke's volumes have been painstakingly searched (they're not indexed) for any and every clue concerning the Jernigans/Jerninghams and related families in England. I myself only learned about a year or so ago (from the book "British Roots of Maryland Families") about documents called Visitations. Basically these are family trees of English noble families complete with little side notes. In the past in England some people were claiming to be of the nobility and they were receiving priveleges they weren't entitled to because they really weren't of noble families at all. So, in order to prevent this from happening the officers of the heraldic offices in London went on "Visitations" to all of the counties in England. And they visited all of the manor houses etc and if the family displayed arms -- they were asked to prove that they were entitled to them by providing detailed pedigrees. These were written down and preserved. An organization called the Harleian Society has copies of the originals in their collections. Some of these have been published. They are full of wonderful genealogical information. There are other documents such as parish registers and vestry books some of which have also been collected and published in book form. And of course tons of volumes of Burke's to go through. I have seen notations even in the one volume of Burke's that I have indicating members of noble families who emigrated to the Americas or elsewhere. I don't remember which family but I know I saw the notation for one of the sons that simply said, "went to Virginia". I also have a copy of Foster's "Dictionary of Heraldry" which has info on some of the other older families associated with Jernigans/Jerninghams. Most of those are of Norman origin. A few of Saxon but primarily Norman. Burke's are very respectable and they definitely did their homework. An entire complete collection of Burke's would make my library massively complete! lol

Re: First documented collateral family in Va or NC

Posted: 12 Mar 2012 8:20AM GMT
Classification: Query
How very interesting!! You clearly sound like you've been doing this for some time .. I don't mind doing the tedious going through census records, newspapers and publications, etc., because I have caught some pieces and that were cool, but I would love to read some of the literature like you're talking about. The few pieces I've read that other people have made available about Jernigan history were delightful! They spur me on to dig and find stories about my own line.

As a relative newbie, what books might I be able to find that would tell of family history with life stories, preferably about the Jernigans, even in less mentioned but pertinent history?

Thanks

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