Search for content in message boards

Separate families

Separate families

Posted: 14 Nov 2012 9:01PM GMT
Classification: Query
Is it possible, and easy, to separate families. I have my family and my husbands family on one tree, I would like to separate them, that is have my family on one tree and my husbands side on another. Can this be done. I'm using family tree maker 2012.

Re: Separate families

Posted: 14 Nov 2012 11:55PM GMT
Classification: Query
Liz

It can be done a couple of ways and is fairly easy. The problems come up when there are people common to both sides of the family. Your cousin marrying your husband’s cousin. The brother of your great-grandmother marrying the sister of you husbands great-grandmother. This can lead to them and their descendants being common to both tress. Every time you add someone to one tree you have to check the other tree to see if they have a connection over there. If this later becomes an issue you can run into serious problems trying to put the trees back together. Merging trees is a lot harder and more error prone then splitting trees.

My recommendation is to leave everybody in one tree. If, at some point you have a need to split of part of your tree to share it, it is easy to do.

Curt

Re: Separate families

Posted: 15 Nov 2012 12:11AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 15 Nov 2012 1:37PM GMT

First, are you sure you want to split your file? There are lots of things you will have to do twice; from resolving places to saving reports to duplicating sources and source media and other media.

What is the purpose of your desire to split your file? Is it so both you and your husband can work on the same file at the same time? Or, is it to export "trees" to give to cousins, or..???

If you going to do a straight export of descendants of an ancestor or ancestors of a person in your file - without regard to peripheral relatives - you can take a look at File > Export. This exports records and does not disturb your file.

To split a file, that is to export and then to delete people, you have to resort to the Charts in the Publish Workspace. The individuals in most charts can be exported and then deleted by right clicking in the blank area of a chart.

If you want to split your file into two pieces and keep peripheral relatives on both sides:

1) Make a duplicate backup file, with its accompanying media folder, in a separate folder from your main file and with a different name, to do the below steps.

2) Then, break the bond between you and your husband in some way. Either unattach yourselves as spouses, or unattach one of you from your parents.

3) Select one of you - husband or wife.

4) Now, go to the Publish Workspace > Charts > Extended Family Chart

a) UNCHECK the box to include ALL individuals.

b) Elect to include "everyone" related to the seleced person up to 99 generations.

c)Depending on the number of individuals, go get a large cup of coffee or watch some tv or go to bed.

d) Right click export everybody in this report.

e) In button bar - save this report.

I would save that report before deleting. I wouldn't delete these folks until I opened the new file and I knew everything was ok.

Then, re-open the saved file and right click delete the folks in that chart.

______________________

This is the only way to include peripheral relatives in your report. Most of us accumulate parents of spouses, multiple spouses of parents and ourselves and siblings, etc. And, then accumulate children of those multiple spouses and so on. The Extended Family Chart is the only way in FTM to gather all of the periphjeral people in your file in one report. It gathers everyone connected to the selected person by blood or marriage.

Re: Separate families

Posted: 15 Nov 2012 1:42AM GMT
Classification: Query
I think you need to come up with at least 5 valid reasons to be doing this before your try it.

As stated, you are going to create a lot of extra work. But if you still insist in doing this, follow the instructions as provided earlier, BUT, make two NEW files and leave the current one in tact. This way you can fall back to it and not loose anything up front.

Re: Separate families

Posted: 15 Nov 2012 7:46AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thanks all for your full and informative replies. I will probably do as suggested in the last post, that is do a backup and keep the original tree before splitting into two.

Many thanks.

Re: Separate families

Posted: 15 Nov 2012 10:08AM GMT
Classification: Query
Liz

You can create and keep a backup of your file before splitting it. As you work on both new files this backup rapidly becomes obsolete and is of no use. Or are you going to maintain all three files? That is a lot of extra work.

Curt

Re: Separate families

Posted: 15 Nov 2012 4:17PM GMT
Classification: Query
At this time you may think you have no connection between the two families. Unless your wife's family is from Japan and yours from Europe, there will be connections. It took me many years of research to find the connections in my parents families, but they had occurred only about 15 years before my parents were married.

As you do research you will find genealogically the old Kevin Bacon game is true most every one is related by about six connections.

Re: Separate families

Posted: 15 Nov 2012 5:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
Curt,
My suggestion of the two NEW files, is so Liz could fall back to her current data right away, as soon as she finds out how much work it is going to be in cleaning up these two new files.

Yes, the backup copy is doing the same thing, but it must be recovered and it just may take more time. Also one MUST remember the time stamp, as the edit copy would still have the same file name and this can really mess things up.

Re: Separate families

Posted: 16 Nov 2012 12:02PM GMT
Classification: Query
David

Splitting is easy. I have done it a number of times for various reasons. I have never attempted to maintain multiple trees. I use the split of tree for whatever reason it was created and then delete it.

Unless a lot of people end up in both trees it is not immediately obvious that there are clean up problems and then what do you do about them. There is a reason people are in both trees, they have a connection thru blood or marriage to both principle people.

If both principle people are from families that lived in the same general area for several generations you are going to eventually find connections between both sides of the family. I find them all the time in unexpected places.

It seems to me for everyone asking how to split trees there is someone wanting to know how to combine trees. Almost everyone who replies agrees splitting is much easier then combining.

Curt

Re: Separate families

Posted: 16 Nov 2012 9:06PM GMT
Classification: Query
I have played with the extended family chart a little lately. I see islands of family groups that surprise me a bit. Does that mean there are multiple connections that I might not be aware of or is this simply a way the software displays a large complex tree? In other words, can I use the extended family chart to uncover multiple connections I might not be aware of?
per page

Find a board about a specific topic

  • Visit our other sites:

© 1997-2014 Ancestry.com | Corporate Information | New Privacy | New Terms and Conditions