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Passenger lists from france to Canada

Passenger lists from france to Canada

Louise Hopkins (View posts)
Posted: 9 Oct 2000 2:49PM GMT
I have tried to find the Passenger lists that
my ancestors,Robideaux(Robidou, Robideau)
and associated families were on coming to Quebec
from France.
Can anyone help me? It would be much appreciated.
Please email at louisehopkins@mail.com
Louise

Passenger lists/France to Canada

isabelle (View posts)
Posted: 21 Oct 2000 7:18AM GMT
Hello, what years are you interested in? The Canadian Government has on-line records for the years 1925 to 1956, and some years before that on manual search. Formerly, there were some records that had been kept at the landing ports, such as Halifax, Quebec City, and Montreal, but they were incomplete, and scattered in different places. Also, the Canadian records are only for those passengers who were going to settle in Canada. Persons who were intending to go into the USA would have only been listed as "IN TRANSIT" with no other details, whereas the persons that intended to settle in Canada would have had much more detail in the lists. Hope some of this is helpful. Jim Bunting, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Passenger Lists

Louise Hopkins (View posts)
Posted: 21 Oct 2000 3:27PM GMT
Thanks for the answer! The years would have been
late 1600 to 1700's.
Louise Hopkins

Passenger lists from france 1700 to 1800's

jim bunting (View posts)
Posted: 24 Oct 2000 6:15AM GMT
This type of information is very hard to come by, as there was no formal requirement to keep records, with no organised government structure to make or enforce any rules. The only suggestion I have for you is to try approaching the catholic church, especially the Jesuit order. They were among the earliest settlers in French North America, and did keep records, but I am not sure if they would have had records of arrivals. They did keep records of births, marriages, and deaths, but only of Catholics in good standing. By the way, do you know that many of the people who came to NA from France were forced to go as an alternative to serving a prison sentence. In other words many of the ancestors that people are seeking, were petty criminals, and protitutes, and theives. Not all, mind you, but a significant percentage. Jim Bunting...

Passenger Lists

Louise Hopkins (View posts)
Posted: 24 Oct 2000 11:07AM GMT
Thank you for the suggestion! Also the info, I did not
I did not know this.
Louise Hopkins

Re: Passenger lists from france to Canada

Brandi Sangunett (View posts)
Posted: 4 Feb 2002 11:19PM GMT
Classification: Query
Louise,
Are the Robidouxs your are researching any relation to Joseph Robideux Sr. who settled St. Joseph, Mo in 1826? If so, you will find lots of information about this line from the North West Missouri Genealogical Society officed in St. Joe.

Re: Passenger lists from france to Canada

Posted: 16 Feb 2002 2:48AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 30 Jun 2003 9:55AM GMT
Thanks for the info.
I believe there was a connection some way but I am not sure how.
Louise

Re: Passenger lists from france 1700 to 1800's

Posted: 25 Apr 2002 8:23PM GMT
Classification: Query
Under the French Regime it was not a lack of organized government structure but an overabundance of it during the 1600's and 1700's. There were 3 governments (Montreal, Trois Rivieres and Quebec) each with their own governor, intendant and milicia. The records kept in Quebec are a combination of church and notarial records (in those days you did not lend out a cow without having a notary prepare a document detailing the terms and conditions). Although lists of passengers by ship and year do not always exist - there are many that do (ie: Liste Debien, Auger, Massicotte, etc) - these lists were of people who were hired in France to come to the new world - it details all kinds of information including in some cases how much they were paid, the term of their contract, etc. There are many sites that have lists of the ships that came to new france and from notary records you can often find when someone first "appeared" giving an indication as to when they arrived in the colony.

New France was a penal colony from 1722 to 1725 - the practice was discontinued when the bishop and intendant of New France complained to the king to cease the importation of "this sort of people who have no faith and no religion, who are capable of the most horrific crimes and vices ..." - the practice was ended in 1725. For the most part these people were an insignificant percentage of the settlers - the majority of settlers were soldiers, filles du roi (who were orphan girls under the protection of the king and not prostitutes as has often been postulated), poor families, merchants and single men/boys who wanted adventure as "courreur de bois".

Check out this site: http://www.rootsweb.com/~canqc/ressources.htm for everything you ever want to know on researching french canadian roots.

Re: Passenger lists from france 1700 to 1800's

Posted: 6 May 2007 5:19AM GMT
Classification: Query
If I am not mistaken, Les Filles du Roi came in different waves of immigration. In each wave they came from different parts of society. Many came from fine families who put down ample dowries for their daughters' new lives, including the one I descend from.I don't know where that prostitute rumour started...
Thank you for the information regarding New France being a penal colony-even if for a short few years. In all the historical research I have done, I had never come across this nugget of information.Certainly something they did not wish to advertise,unlike Australia.

Re: Passenger lists from france 1700 to 1800's

Posted: 6 May 2007 1:48PM GMT
Classification: Query
Yes - les Filles du Roi came in waves over a period of about 9 yrs ... see: http://www.civilization.ca/vmnf/popul/filles/s-fil-en.htm for more information about this topic.

Unlike Australia, that was a bona fide penal colony in whole and not in part - Quebec was a penal colony for a very short period of time, where France attempted to dump it's problems on the new colony however the new colony pushed back and said no. Needless to say no one wanted to "promote" the new colony as a place where "problems" were sent so it was done very much on the "down low" and because of the problems engendered by this sort of people, it was soon ended.

There isn't much information about this period of time (1722-1725) nor is there much information about Quebec's history with slavery.

If you read French there are some excellent books out there that speak about Quebec's history in these matters - one of my favorites is "Mythes et realites dans l'histoire du Quebec" by Marcel Trudel ...

Quebec - like other nations would probably prefer that aspects of its history not be remembered or highlighted (such as during the 30s and 40s when Quebec was quite facist and anti-semitic) ... like Canada would prefer not to think on the it's strategic bommbing campaign during WWII and the enduring controversy of this (see: http://www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/media/bg_history_e.html) ... or as the United States is currently creating its history with Guantanamo Bay, Iraq, rendition, spying on its own people, etc etc ...

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