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RANSOM, Epaphroditus, MI governor 1848-1850

RANSOM, Epaphroditus, MI governor 1848-1850

Posted: 2 Nov 2003 6:51AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 27 Nov 2006 3:09AM GMT
Surnames: RANSOM, FLETCHER
Can someone direct me to where I might find any additional family informaton about Epaphroditus?

This is what I know:
Epaphroditus was the fourth child of Ezekiel (1763-1838) and Lucinda Fletcher (1772-1856) . He became the 7th Governor of Michigan:
Epaphroditus Ransom 1848-1850 Democratic Party. He had a brother, Samuel H. Ransom (1810-1876).

The father, Major Ezekial Ransom was supposed to have been involved in the founding of the Kalamazoo College.

Re: RANSOM, Epaphroditus, MI governor 1848-1850

Posted: 8 Oct 2004 4:09AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Ransom, Fletcher, Cadwell
Historical outline of the Ransom family of America and genealogical record of the Colchester, Conn., branch
Ann Arbor, Mich.: Richmond & Backus Co., 1903, 451 pgs.
Author; Ransom, Wyllys Cadwell
(Book found on Heritage Quest. Note that the author is the son of Gov. Epaphroditus Ransom you're inquiring about)
page 138
Eldest son & 4th child of Ezekiel and Lucinda Fletcher Ransom
No 87 Epaphroditus Ransom (34 Ezekiel) b. at Shelburne Falls, Mass., March 24, 1798; married Almira Cadwell Montpelier, Vt. Feb 21, 1827; d. Nov 12 1859; Almira C. March 15 1877 both at Fort Scott Kan., and are buried in the family lot in Mountain Home Cemetery, Kalamazoo, Mich.
___________________
A Twentieth century history of Allegan County, Michigan
Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1907, 725 pgs.
page 548
Allegan County Circuit Court Judge 1836-48
Epaphroditus Ransom
___________________
The red book of Michigan : a civil, military and biographical history
Detroit: E.B. Smith & Co., 1871, 557 pgs
page 510
Officers of the University of Michigan from 1837-1870
President of the board of regents 1848
Epaphroditus Ransom
______________________

The history of Anderson County, Kansas : from its first settlement to the Fourth of July, 1876
Garnett, Kan.: Kauffman & Iler, Garnett Plaindealer, 1877, 287 pgs.
page 110
On the 16th of January, 1859, ex-Governor Epaphroditus Ransom and 116 citizens of Fort Scott petitioned the Govenor to establish martial law in Lunn, Bourbon, Allen
and Anderson Counties.
______________________

Bench and bar of Michigan : a volume of history and biography
Chicago: Century Pub. and Engraving Co., 1897, 740 pgs.
page 373
Bio - Edward Cahill of Lansing, ex- Suprememe Court Judge of Michigan
Edward 2nd of 6 children born August 3, 1843 in Kalamazoo County.
Abstract:
Son of Abraham Cahill, a tanner, who settled in Kalamazoo in 1831 where 10 years later he married Miss Frances Maria Marsh, daughter of John P. Marsh, pioneer settler and niece of Epaph. Ransom, and early judge of the Supreme Court and Govenor of the State of Michigan from 1848-1850. In 1845 Abraham move 3 miles into the county and settled on a farm in Grand Prarie. Next moved to Hollan , MI in 1854 and engaged in lumber. In Aug 1854 Abraham Died and the family moved back to Kalamazoo. [Edward moved all over MIchigan and was for a time in Chicago, bio never mentions a wife or children]

_____________________________

History of Bourbon County, Kansas : to the close of 1865
Fort Scott, Kan.: Press of the Monitor Book & Print. Co., 1894, 243 pgs
page 146
Epaphroditus Ransom died at his residence in Fort Scott, Nov. 11th. [1859 - from date of convention he was at in October]

___________________________________

History of Allegan and Barry Counties, Michigan : with illustrations and biographical sketches of their prominent men and pioneers.
Philadelphia: D.W. Ensign & Co., 1880, 642 pgs
page 54
Hon. Epaproditus Ransom, who held all the early circuits in Allegan County, was a native of Hampshire., Co., Mass. Graduated at the Northampton law-school in 1825, removed to Michigan about 1833, and was admitted to the bar at Kalamazoo in 1834.


page 240
Section 25 bought from 1836-1854 Epaphroditus Ransom
section 36 bought from 1837-1852 Epaphroditus Ransom

___________________
Much is written in many Michigan History book about him and various family members. Many are buried in the same cemetery as he is.

Try this link and search and you'll find alot of information on the family in Michigan.

http://www.hti.umich.edu/m/micounty/index.html

Hope this is of some help to someone. I'd appreciated being contacted on this family.
Darla

Re: RANSOM, Epaphroditus, MI governor 1848-1850

Posted: 8 Oct 2004 4:33AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 27 Nov 2006 3:09AM GMT
Surnames: Ransom, Potter, Morgan
Darla,
Thanks so much for all the research. My connection is through Epaphroditus's brother, Samuel Ransom (1810-1876) and his daughter, Abby Augusta Ransom (1844-1917) & husband Andrew Potter. Their son, William Ransom Potter (1860-1930) married my great-grandmother's sister, Minnie Mae Morgan (1872-1947).
Jodi in Minneapolis

Re: RANSOM, Epaphroditus, MI governor 1848-1850

Posted: 8 Oct 2004 9:08AM GMT
Classification: Query
You're very welcome. I'm glad you got the information since you were the one who asked. I didn't have a brother Samuel for him but then I didn't copy everything from the Ransom family book either. Did Samuel or any descendants stay in the Kalamazoo area? I'd be very interested to know if he did and whom his children married. I've been researching most of the early pioneer Kalamazoo / Climax area families as well as many that are tied in, in the Leroy Twp., Calhoun Co., area. That's why I had so much on Epap. in my notes.

I'd be interested in knowing more on Lucinda Fletcher and if she had other family in the Michigan area also if you know. Ezekiel and Lucinda Ransom's son, Roswell married a distant cousin of mine whose mother was a Lovell. Another of their sons, Farnsworth, married Lucile Lovell. The more I researched this family the more distance ties I had to them including in my Pearce / Pierce family, and many of the early families of the area. I wasn't looking to tie them in, it just happened.

Honestly I have almost all of the early Pioneers of Climax now tied into one another through the generations if not several times. The "link to existing person " in my genealogy program is getting well used. I been fortunate to share information with many descendants over the years. Some day, I'll figure out my Henry H. Howard ancester / 3rd ggrandfather who happened to be in the Climax area several years before (1829) many of the 'pioneers' but seems to be very overlooked in the history books. I think I've recently figured out some on him and his family but I've yet to verify it. If I'm correct it would explain his family being somewhat left out of the Kalamazoo History books.

Darla

RANSOM, Samuel H. (1810-1876)

Posted: 8 Oct 2004 7:53PM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 27 Nov 2006 3:09AM GMT
Surnames: Ransom, Potter, Morgan, Baker, Goddard, Huntington, Hall
Darla,
This is probably more info than I should post here, but someone else might find it interesting at some point...

1 Samuel H. RANSOM
Birth: 23 December 1810, Townshend, Vermont
Death: 21 June 1876, Waukesha WI, age: 65
Burial: Kalamazoo, MI
Father: Major Ezekiel RANSOM (1763-1838)
Mother: Lucinda FLETCHER (1772-1856)

Samuel was the tenth (of 14) child of Ezekiel and Lucinda.
---------
From a handwritten ancestor chart for Morgan Huntington Potter, Samuel H. Ransom is listed as having died in Kalamazoo, Mich.1

Spouse: Eleanor Beach/Boyd GODDARD2
Birth: 30 June 1812, Chester, VT
Death: 11 June 1885, Kalamazoo, MI, age: 72
Father: Pling (Pliny-Phiny) GODDARD
Mother: Laura A. BEACH
Marr: July 1839

Samuel and Eleanor moved to Kalamazoo, MI in July of 1839.3

Children:
Laura Aristine (1841-1904)
Abby Augusta (1844-1917)
Alla B. (~1846-)
Clarissa / Kitty G./Kate (~1848-)
William B. (~1851-)

1.1 Laura Aristine RANSOM
Birth: January 1841, Michigan4,5,6
Death: 11 March 1904, Rogers, Benton County, Arkansas, age: 637
Burial: 19 April 1904, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co, MN
Burial Memo: Lakewood Cemetery, site 71-10-4

Laura is the older sister of Abbie. Laura married Westel, Andrew Potter’s best friend, a day before Abbie and Andrew were married (as it was customary that the older sister must be married first. They were both married in Kalamazoo by the Rev. Jeremiah Hall, D.D. who was the brother-in-law fo the two sisters, he being married to Clarissa Ransom.8

Obituary: LAURA A. HUNTINGTON
Age 64
Death Date 03/11/1904
Place of Death ROGERS, ARK.
Disposition Date 04/19/1904
Site Id 71-10-4
http://www.lakewoodcemetery.com/f_welcome.htm - found on 12 Oct 2003

Census: 1860 June 21, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo (M653 roll 548, page 462)
House numbered 407, families numbered 404, line 14
Samuel H. Ransom, age 49, male, farmer, value of real estate: 20,000, value of personal estate: 5000, born in Vermont.
Eleanor B. Ransom, age 47, female, born in Vermont.
Aristine Ransom, age 19, female, born in Michigan.
Abby A. Ransom, age 16, female, born in Michigan.
Alla B. Ransom, age 14, female, born in Michigan.
Kitty G. Ransom [first name may be something else], age 12, female, born in Michigan.
William B. Ransom, age 9, male, born in Michigan.
Minnie L. Coe, age 19, female, born in New York.
All the children had attended school with in the year.
source: http://www.heritagequestonline.com/ 1 Nov 2003.

Spouse: Westal W HUNTINGTON
Birth: November 1840, New York9,10
Death: 15 December 1913, age: 737
Burial: 21 May 1914, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co, MN7
Burial Memo: Lakewood Cemetery, site 71-10-5.5
Father: Jonas HUNTINGTON (~1804-1887)
Mother: Abbie A. GODDARD

Westal was Andrew Potter’s best friend. The two couples left Kalamazoo soon after they were married, arriving in Minneapolis in 1866. They collaborated in several business adventures for 23 years. First in a general store, selling buggy whips, notions, cigars, etc., as HUNTINGTON & POTTER, a store at Hennepin and Washington Aves. From the beginning, they were partners in a dozen other activities ranging from milling, lumbering, real estate, insurance, etc. They became active in civic affairs in the growing city; belonging to the Chamber of Commerce, active in the First Baptist Chuch and in politics, Westel becoming County Treasurer of Hennepin County.8
Both families - the Huntingtons and the Andrew Potters, built and lived in a beautiful large home located at 13th Street and Harmon Place overlooking one of Minneapolis’ first and most beautiful parks and lake. It was called Loring Park, which is the center of the city, today surrounded by beautiful churches, Walker Art Gallery, Theater of Fine Arts and beautiful Kenwood Hill which was plotted and sold by HUNTINGTON-POTTER REAL ESTATE.
The combine broke up in 1900 when Andrew Potter semi-retired to Rogers, Arkansas, in 1900, and the Huntingtons retired to South Pasadena in 1905, after the death of Abbie’s sister on a visit to Rogers, March 11, 1904.8

Westal was the business partner of George L. Baker and Andrew R. Potter in a company called: BAKER, POTTER & CO. This was a Real Estate company located at 803 Lumber Exchange. (from the Davison’s Mpls City Directory of 1889-90) George L. Baker died on 23 March 1890.11

Obituary: Maybe this is the right guy:
WILLIAM W. HUNTINGTON
Age 74
Death Date 12/15/1913
Place of Death Unavailable
Disposition Date 05/21/1914
Site Id 71-10-5.5
http://www.lakewoodcemetery.com/f_welcome.htm found on 12 October 2003

Residences: MINNEAPOLIS, MN
1889-90: Wm. W.(Baker, Potter & Co.) pres. Northern Mill Co. pinelands. r. 1225 Harmon Pl.
1890-91: Wm. W. Real Estate and Lumber, 803 Lumber Exch. r. Northwood
1894: Wm. W. pres. Sterling Investment Co. r. Lake Minnetonka
1895-96: Wm. W. pres. Sterling Inv. Co. r. Lake Minnetonka
1897: Wm. W. pres. Sterling Inv. Co. r. Lake Minnetonka
1905: Wm. W. Real Estate 809 Sykes Blk r. Minnetonka Beach, Lake Minnetonka
1908: no listing
1910: Wm. W. salsn Geo R. Newell & Co. r. 3320 Irving av S.

Census: 1860 Michigan, Kalamzoo County, Village of Kalamazoo (M653, roll 548, page 456)
Dwelling house numbered: 368, Families numbered 365. line number 24.
Westfale [Westall?] Huntington, age 21 Male, Clerk, born in New York.
[there are 10 people listed in this house, there are 3 other people randomly listed on this page with the last name of “Westfale”].
source: http://www.heritagequestonline.com/ 1November2003

Marr: 28 May 1865, Kalamazoo, MI
Marr Memo: Rev Jeremiah Hall, D.D.

Westal and Laura retired and moved from Minneapolis to South Pasadena in 1905.3

1.2 Abby Augusta RANSOM
Birth: 31 December 1844, Kalamazoo, MI
Death: 2 July 1917, Rogers, Benton County, Arkansas, age: 7212
Death Memo: Monday, 3:20pm.
Burial: Rogers, Benton County, Arkansas13
Burial Memo: Plot 213 Rogers Cemetery
Educ: Kalamazoo College
Reli: Baptist
Cause: Heart Trouble12

Abbie was a very sophisticated woman, always dressed in her best silk dress, lacey apron, pince nez eyeglasses on a black ribbon around her neck. She came from very distinguished Colonial stock. She graduated from Kalamazoo College, a college that was founded in 1837 by her grandfather, Ezekial Ransom.14
Abbie was married a day after her older sister, Laura, married Andrew Potter’s best friend Westal Huntington. They were both married in Kalamazoo by the Rev. Jeremiah Hall, D.D. who was the brother-in-law of the two sisters, he being married to Clarissa Ransom.3
*********
Abbie’s will left all of her estate to be equally divided between her two children (Will in Minneapolis and Nell in San Diego)15

Obituary: POTTER, Abbie RAMSON - Mrs. Abbie Ransom Potter died very suddenly Monday evening at 3:20 o'clock at her home in this city, corner of Cherry and Fifth streets. Death was the result of heart trouble. At the time of writing this notice funeral arrangements had not been made, awaiting the arrival of the daughter, Mrs. A.V. Hayden of Solomonsville, Ariz. Her son, Wm. Potter of Minneapolis, has been quite ill and is not expected to be able to come. Mrs. Potter was born at Kalamazoo, Mich. and was 73 years old. She was married 53 years ago to A.R. Potter who died in Rogers June 5, 1912. From Kalamazoo they moved to Minneapolis where they lived until they came to Rogers seventeen years ago. Mrs. Potter spent the winter with her daughter in Arizona, as had been her custom, returning to Rogers in April. A sister-in-law, Mrs. W.B. Ransom of Chicago, was spending the summer here with her. The deceased was a member of the Baptist church and a woman of much talent and character. Her death is deeply regretted by the entire community. Rogers Democrat 7-5-1917.

(Received from a woman named Becky at <THETRHEAS@aol.com> a volunteer who looks up obits from Benton County, AR (http://www.rootsweb.com/~arbenton/lookups.htm) 19 Sept 2003)

Census: 1860 June 21, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo (M653 roll 548, page 462)
House numbered 407, families numbered 404, line 14
Samuel H. Ransom, age 49, male, farmer, value of real estate: 20,000, value of personal estate: 5000, born in Vermont.
Eleanor B. Ransom, age 47, female, born in Vermont.
Aristine Ransom, age 19, female, born in Michigan.
Abby A. Ransom, age 16, female, born in Michigan.
Alla B. Ransom, age 14, female, born in Michigan.
Kitty G. Ransom [first name may be something else], age 12, female, born in Michigan.
William B. Ransom, age 9, male, born in Michigan.
Minnie L. Coe, age 19, female, born in New York.
All the children had attended school with in the year.
source: http://www.heritagequestonline.com/ 1 Nov 2003.

Spouse: Andrew Robinson POTTER
Birth: 1 September 1842, Watertown, NY
Death: 12 June 1912, Rogers, Benton County, Arkansas, age: 6916
Death Memo: Tuesday, 9:45am
Burial: Rogers, Benton County, Arkansas13
Burial Memo: Plot 213, Rogers Cemetery
Occ: Real Estate
Reli: Baptist
milit: Civil War (Michigan 4th Cavalry)
Cause: Heart Failure, Asthma16
Father: John POTTER Esquire (1805-1892)
Mother: Ruth L. ROBINSON (1813-1886)

Andrew volunteered in the Michigan 4th Cavalry on the 30th of August, 1862. His career was somewhat clouded by being ‘discharged from their present enlistments to enable them to accept appointments as Commissioned Officers in the Volunteer Service on Oct. 20,1863.’ Little is known about his activities from then until his mustering out July 1, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn., by Major General Thomas. But in later years, I learned from an old Arkansas friend, Fred Applegate, who lived across the street, that “Captain Potter” told him many an exciting story about raiding parties he had made behind confederate lines, to commandeer horses needed by his cavalry company.17

ANDREW POTTER of Kalamazoo, age 20 is listed on the roster of the 4th Michigan Cavalry, Company “H”. The captain is listed as Alfred Abeel of Dearborn, age 27, 1st Lieutenant is Frank Burr, of Grand Rapids, age 18 and 2nd Lieutenant is Arthur B. Wood of Grand Rapids, age 27. 18

Andrew was the best friend of Westal Huntington, the husband of Abby’s sister, Laura. The two couples left Kalamazoo soon after they were married, arriving in Minneapolis in 1866. They collaborated in several business adventures for 23 years. First in a general store, selling buggy whips, notions, cigars, etc., as HUNTINGTON & POTTER, a store at Hennepin and Washington Aves. From the beginning, they were partners in a dozen other activities ranging from milling, lumbering, real estate, insurance, etc. They became active in civic affairs in the growing city; belonging to the Chamber of Commerce, active in the First Baptist Chuch and in politics, Westel becoming County Treasurer of Hennepin County.8

Obituary: Plot 213 in the Rogers Cemetery at 510 S. 10th Street, Rogers, Arkansas 72756
479-621-116419

POTTER, A.R. - A. R. Potter died at 9:45 Tuesday morning at his home, corner of Fifth and Cherry streets, the result of heart failure and asthma. He suffered a severe attack a few days previous to his death and his condition had been considered serious with little hope for recovery. Mr. Potter was born September 1, 1842 and had been a resident of Rogers for the past 12 years, being engaged in the real estate, loan and insurance business. He has suffered much in recent years from asthma and has spend the winters largely at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E.V. Hayden of Beaumont, Texas. He also leaves one son, Wm. Potter, of Minneapolis. Mrs. Hayden and Mr. Potter arrived this morning from their respective homes and the funeral services will be held at the home this afternoon at 4:30 o'clock. Mrs. Hayden was accompanied by her daughter, Miss Ara. Mr. Potter was a man who had travelled widely and was well informed on matters of general interest. He had a large circle of friends in Rogers and his death is a great sorrow to them. The bereaved wife has the sympathy of the entire community. Rogers Democrat 6-6-1912 (Received from a woman named Becky at <THETRHEAS@aol.com> a volunteer who looks up obits from Benton County, AR (http://www.rootsweb.com/~arbenton/lookups.htm) 19 Sept 2003)

Residences: Kalamazoo, MI
Minneapolis, MN
Rogers, AR
--------
1889-90: A.R. Potter (Baker, Potter & Co.) sec. The Central Elev co. r.1225 Harmon Pl.
1890-91: (Baker, Potter & Co) r. 1912 Kenwood boul.
1893: Potter, Andrew R. real est. 59 Loan and Trust Bldg r. Lake Minnetonka
1894: Potter, Andrew R. real est. 59 Loan and Trust Bldg r. Lake Minnetonka
1895-96: loans, 66 Loan and Trust bldg. r.Minnetonka Beach
1897: loans, 66 Loan and Trust bldg. r. Minnetonka Beach
1898: there is a photo of him in the door of a miner’s shack in Alaska.
1900: no listing
1904: there is a photo of him in Rogers, Arkansas in his office
1905: no listing

also lived in Kalamazoo, Michigan and Rogers, Arkansas.20

Work History: in Minneapolis: general store (Huntington & Potter at Hennepin & Washington), flour milling, lumbering, real estate, insurance,

1904, in Rogers, Arkansas: realtor, land owner, director of one of the first railroads to be laid between Rogers and Bentonville.21

Andrew was the business partner of George L. Baker and Wm W. Huntington in a company called: BAKER, POTTER & CO. This was a Real Estate company located at 803 Lumber Exchange. (from the Davison’s Mpls City Directory of 1889-90) George L. Baker died on 23 March 1890.11
----------------

Census: 1860 June 25, Michigan, Kalamazoo County, Village of Kalamazoo (M653, Roll 548, page 471)
Dwelling house numbered 475
families numbered 474
John Potter, age 51, Male, profession: wharf & ship labor [hard to read, it might not say this at all], value of real estate: 8500, value of personal estate: 1000, born in Connecticut.
Ruth L. Potter, age 47, born in Vermont
Andrew R. age 17, born in New York, attended school within the year.
Mary [hard to read last name] Mannes?, age 13, Female, servant, born in England.
Mary Robinson, age 18, Female, born in Indiana.
[first name hard to read, might start with ‘R’] Coe, age 16, Female, born in Michigan.
Andrew Robinson, age 78, value of personal estate 2800, born in Vermont
Pricilles [hard to read first name] Robinson, age 75, born in Mass.
source: http://www.heritagequestonline.com/ 1 November 2003.

Military: HISTORY OF THE
4th
Regiment Michigan
Volunteer Cavalry

1862-1865
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Fourth Cavalry was authorized about the 1st. of July, 1862, with Colonel R. Minty, of Detroit, Lt.Colonel of the Third Cavalry as commander, being ordered into rendezvous at Detroit, on the 29th. of July. It was mustered into the service of the United States on the 29th. of August, with the maximum force, being composed of companies recruited in various parts of the State. When they left Michigan on the 26th. of September, it had on its rolls the names of 1233 officers and men. They were fully armed and equipped, their destination being, Louisville,KY.

The Fourth, under the command of Colonel Minty, marched from Louisville on October the 10th., being in the advance on Stanford,KY, where the confederate Morgan was stationed with 2500 men, two pieces of artillery. Attacking and driving Morgan as far as Crab Orchard, killing a Lieutenant Colonel, taking a Major and 11 men prisoners, the Regiment marched back to Mumfordsville. On November 1st., it marched, 543 strong, from this point, with the cavalry division, via Bowling Green, South Union, Springfield and Mitchellville, to Galatin,TN, there reporting to Major General Crittenden, on November 8th. Crossing the Cumberland River, it met and drove back Morgan's pickets, next morning marched to Lebanon, again driving in his pickets, then at a gallop entered that town, two miles in advance of the Infantry, attacking and driving Morgan, with his force of 750 men, his two pieces of artillery, capturing a large number of mules, commissary stores and clothing, rejoining Crittenden at Silver Springs, where they engaged in scouting the surrounding countryside.

On the 19th, they escorted the 14th. Brigade from Rural Hill to Stewart's Ferry, where they continued on scouting duty, when on the 9th., they reported to General Stanley, Chief of Cavalry, then marched to Camp Rosecrans, near Nashville, where they were again engaged in scouting, having lost 3 men wounded, during October and November. At 7 O'Clock on the morning of December the 4th., Colonel Minty, with 302 officers and men, moved from Nashville on a reconnaissance in the direction of Franklin. When about eight miles from Nashville, they encountered the confederate pickets, driving them back on both Wilson Creek and Franklin Pikes, to their reserve, posted at Hollow Tree Gap, naturally an exceedingly strong position. Dislodging the confederates at this point, they advanced to within one mile of Franklin, where a large confederate force was stationed., thence they returned to camp at Nashville, not having sustained any loss. On the 17th., the Regiment, as part of a larger cavalry force, under the command of General D.S. Stanley, moved towards Triune, engaging the confederates about eight miles out, on the Wilson Creek Pike, driving them back to within three miles of Triune. Learning that the southerners were in force at that point, under Buckner and Hardee, General Stanley withdrew three miles and halted on a crossroad to Franklin, the horses remain saddled all of the night. Before daybreak, they moved on, arriving at Franklin about 7 A.M. Finding the confederates 1300 strong, well posted, under cover of houses along the bank of the river, Colonel Minty advanced with the Regiment at a gallop to a shallow ford, the bridge having been destroyed, where, with his revolving rifles, he succeeded in forcing a crossing, capturing the rebel pickets and dislodging the force behind them. He pursued them three miles, keeping well in advance of the mounted force, killing one Captain and four men, wounding six, and capturing a stand of colors along with seventeen prisoners, two of whom were officers. Then returning to Franklin, they destroyed a large supply of flour and other stores. Notwithstanding the Regiment was much exposed to hostile fire, they suffered no casualties. They then returned to camp at Nashville.

On the 15th., Captain Abeel, with a picket of 40 men, stationed on the Murfreesboro Pike, was approached by a flag of truce, then while negotiating with a rebel officer, who accompanied it, was surprised and captured with his entire command.

On the 20th., they fought at Laurel Hill. On the 21st., Captain Mix, with 50 men moved out of camp, with orders to scout in the direction of Franklin, on both sides of Wilson Creek Pike, to obtain all information possible. About 2 miles out, he met Colonel Stanley, in charge of a forage train, with two regiments of infantry, a section of artillery, and a detachment of 30 men of the 4th. Kentucky cavalry. The Colonel informed Captain Mix that the Kentuckians were skirmishing with the confederates, and directed him to join them, assume command, then act as his judgement might dictate. Dismounting his men, but failing to dislodge the rebels, strongly posted behind a stone wall, the Captain remounted his force, then charged, causing a precipitate retreat of the defenders, only after they fired two volleys, wounding Sergeant McIntire of Company "B", while the confederates lost 7 killed, with 10 captured.

There was a general advance of the Army of the Cumberland from Nashville, on the 26th, towards Lavernge. The Regiment, in command on Lieutenant Colonel Dickinson, as a part of Minty's Brigade, met the confederates about 10 miles out, on the Murfreesboro Pike. After sharp skirmishing, the rebels fell back, being steadily reinforced until reaching Lavernge, where they made a stand with 2500 cavalry and mounted infantry, with four pieces of artillery, under the command of General Wheeler. Here the fighting continued until dark, when the Regiment bivouacked, having lost one wounded. On the morning of the 27th., the rebels having fallen back, Minty's Brigade moved forward, with the exception of one battalion of the 4th., under the command of Captain Mix, who was sent to the left in advance of the brigade, to report to General Hazen, on the Jefferson Pike. General Hazen directed Captain Mix to gain possession of a bridge, about two miles in front of him, to prevent its destruction. He pushed forward, when he was immediately confronted by a force of rebel cavalry. He charged, then in less than fifteen minutes, had possession of the bridge, having driven an entire rebel regiment of cavalry before them. He was in turn attacked by the whole force of the brigade, but held his position, for an hour and a half, when General Hazen came up with his infantry, when the confederates fell back. Captain Mix had two men wounded with three taken as prisoners.

On the afternoon of the 31st., the Regiment having moved rapidly across the country from Lavernge, whither it had been sent the night before to operate against General Wheeler, rejoined the brigade, which took up a position on the right flank of General McCook, at Stone River, and nearly parallel to, and about three-fourths of a mile from, the Nashville and Murfreesboro Pike.

Here the Regiment,formed a line of dismounted skirmishers, close to the edge of a wood, out of which had been driven a large force of confederate cavalry. Colonel Minty, with his brigade, was here driven back by an overwhelming force of dismounted cavalry, with four pieces of artillery, just at sundown. The rebels remounted, then advancing from the woods, formed four lines. After falling back to the cover of a small knoll, the Colonel reformed the brigade, then ordered a charge, General Stanley leading two companies of the 4th., along with 50 men of the 15th. Pennsylvania, routing the confederates, while capturing four stands of colors. At the same time, Colonel Minty charged the first line in his front, and with the balance of the 4th., along with the 1st. Tennessee, driving it back, then again reforming, dashed at the second line of rebels, which in turn broke and ran, retreating from the field. During the engagement the Regiment lost 5 wounded, 3 prisoners with 2 missing, while in the whole operations surrounding the Battle of Stone River, lost 12 horses killed, 3 wounded and 8 captured. While the loss to the confederates appears to have been very great in prisoners, as Minty's Brigade alone captured 192.

The Regiment, with its brigade, moved out from Murfreesboro on the evening of the 9th., returning to Nashville, scouting the area in between the two cities, to return on the 19th. Early in February the Regiment set out on a scouting mission to gain information and hinder the confederates operating under General's Wheeler and Forrest. During this scout the Regiment marched over 250 miles in much privation, due to the rainey cold weather, but returned with 145 prisoners, including 2 Colonels and 14 other commissioned officers.

The Regiment remained in the Tennessee area, continually scouting and skirmishing with the rebels, until April of 1864, when 800 strong and well equipped, now armed with the Spencer repeating carbine, they left Nashville, under the command of Colonel Park, marching to Columbia, where they became part of the 2nd. Cavalry Division. They then moved through Shelbyville, Tullahoma and Dechard, over the Cumberland Mountains to Stevenson, then Bridgeport, crossed the Tennessee River, to Shell Mound, crossed Raccoon Ridge, Lookout Valley, Lookout Mountain, Pigeon Mountain to Lafayette, then across Taylor's Ridge to Vilanon,GA. They then participated in all of the movements of the army, in the March to Atlanta, where scouting and skirmishing became almost a daily occurrence, in addition to the patrols needed to locate the defensive positions of the retreating confederates. When the Regiment reached Atlanta, in August, its men and mounts had been worked to the limits of endurance.

During the past 12 months, the Regiment had marched over 2600 miles, when they were ordered back to Nashville for re-mounting and re-equipping. On the 12th. of January, 1865, they again moved out, to conduct operations in the Alabama and Georgia areas.

On the 7th. of May 1865, the Regiment was ordered to proceed, as quickly as possible, to Spaulding,GA, in Irwin County, and picket the Omulgee River, from Hawkinsville to the mouth of the Oconee River, for the purpose of preventing the escape of Jefferson Davis, who was then supposed to be making his way to the coast, and if the Regiment got on his track to follow him wherever he went, then to capture, or kill him without fail. At Abbyville, Colonel Minty became satisfied that Davis had already crossed the Ocmulgee River, then ascertained that the 1st. Wisconsin Cavalry were following him closely in the direction of Irwinsville. With 153 of his best mounted men of the Regiment, he followed the line of the Ocmulgee for some miles, then took a bridle path, or blind road through the woods towards Irwinsville, arriving there about 2 A.M. on the 10th., to find that Davis's party had not yet passed.

Pretending to be a part of his escort, Colonel Pritchard gained information from a citizen that Davis was encamped in the woods about three fourths of a mile north of the town.

The camp in which Davis and his family were found was pleasantly situated, surrounded by a thick pine forest, close to a small swamp, not far from a running brook, affording healthful refreshment for the weary fugitives who rested near its banks. In the camp were standing three wall tents, in line, parallel with the road, facing the opposite direction, while the narrow space between the tents, was occupied by several horses, without equipment. Still beyond, in advance of this line of tents, was a small tent, pitched against a large tree. In this closure of tents, reposing all unconscious of the impending danger, lay Davis and his family, together with his military staff. Nearby was the rest of the camp, which appeared to be troops, with army wagons, ambulances, horses and cavalry equipment. The Regiment charged into the camp just at early dawn, completely surprising them, then making the arrest. A few Michigan men then guarded the tents, while the main force was called to the sound of firing, unfortunately caused by a collision of a portion of the 4th., with the 1st. Wisconsin Cavalry, closing in on the camp simultaneously with the 4th.

The camp was soon broken up, when after breakfast and a brief rest, the male prisoners were mounted on their own horses, Mrs. Davis, her servants and the rest of the family were placed in the ambulances for the trip to Macon. On arriving at Macon, Colonel Pritchard, Captain Hudson and Lieutenant's Stauber and Purinton, with 22 men were detailed to escort Davis to Washington D.C.

There having been a reward, of 100,000 dollars, posted for the capture of Davis, the men of the 4th. were naturally elated at their good fortune, however, the War Department appointed a commission that decided that the men of the 4th. were indeed entitled to the money, but when Congress approved the appropriation, a claim was immediately put forth by the men of the 1st. Wisconsin. It was not until July of 1868 that a bill authorizing the payment was passed, and at that time Congress felt the reward be shared by both the 4th. Michigan and the 1st. Wisconsin.

When the money was distributed, it was shared equally by all men who had participated in the expedition.

The Fourth gained a national reputation, with world wide notoriety, by the capture of Davis. It was an accomplishment of an eminently special and important duty, for the nation, so distinctive and definite in its character, as to render a like service impossible, giving it a place in the history of the war, without parallel.

The Regiment, while feeling its duty was more than aptly performed, and that the war was indeed finally complete, returned to Nashville, on the 1st. of July, where they were mustered out of service and paid off. Returning to Michigan, they arrived at Detroit, where they were disbanded on the 10th.

During their term of Federal service, they were engaged at:
Stamford, Ky Gallatin, Tn Lebanon, Tn
Rural Hill, Tn Baird's Mill, Tn Hollow Tree Gap, Tn
Wilson's Creek Road, Tn Purdy, Tn Franklin, Tn
Wilson Creek, Tn Lavernge, Tn Jefferson's Bridge, Tn
Nashville Pike, Tn Stone River, Tn Manchester Pike, Tn
Harpeth River, Tn Bradyville, Tn Woodbury, Tn
Rover, Tn Charlotte, Tn Auburn, Tn
Liberty, Tn Unionville, Tn Thompson's Station, Tn
Rutherford Creek, Tn Duck River, Tn Prosperity Church, Tn
Snow Hill, Tn McMinnville, Tn Statesville, Tn
Alexandria, Tn Wartrace, Tn Middletown, Tn
Versailles, Tn Cherry Valley, Tn Shelbyville, Tn
Hickory Creek, Tn Tullahoma, Tn Rock Island, Tn
Sparta, Tn Sperry Mill, Tn Smith's Cross Roads, Tn
Reed's Bridge, Tn Chickamauga, Ga Rossville, Ga
Cotton Port, Tn Hill Creek, Tn Chattanooga, Tn
Cleveland, Tn Mission Ridge, Tn Tunnel Hill, Ga
Mission Bridge, Ga Arundel Creek, Ga Kingston, Ga
Dallas, Ga Villa Rica, Ga Lost Mountain, Ga
Big Shanty, Ga McAfee's Cross Roads, Ga Noonday Creek, Ga
Kenesaw Mountain, Ga Rosswell, Ga Lebanon Mills, Ga
Stone Mountain, Ga Covington, Ga Flat Rock Creek, Ga
Atlanta, Ga Fair Oaks, Ga Jonesboro, Ga
Lovejoys Station, Ga McDonough's, Ga Rosswell, Ga
Sweet Water, Ga Moses Creek, Ga New Hope Church, Ga
Stilesboro, Ga Rome, Ga Blue Pond, Ga
Selma, Al Double Bridge, Ga Macon, Ga

ORGANIZATION

Organized at Detroit, Mich., and mustered in August 28, 1862.
Left State for Louisville, Ky., September 26.
Attached to 1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Ohio to November, 1862.
1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to January, 1863.
1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to October, 1863.
2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to November, 1863.
1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland to November, 1864.
1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi to November, 1864.
2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi to July, 1865.
Mustered out July 1, 1865.

1861-1865
Total Enrollment 2217
Killed in Action 32
Died of Wounds 15
Died of Disease 328
Total Casualty Rate 16.9%
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http://www.michiganinthewar.org/cavalry/4thcav.htm
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Webpage Editing by Don & Lois Harvey 23

Marr: 29 May 1865, Kalamazoo, MI
Marr Memo: Rev Jeremiah Hall, D.D.

When Andrew and Abby first came to Minneapolis in 1866, they lived in a beautiful large home located at 13th Street and Harmon Place overlooking Loring Park. The nearby area, Kenwood Hill was plotted and sold by HUNTINGTON-POTTER REAL ESTATE.24
Andrew and Abby lived in a palatial home on Kenwood Parkway. They retired to Rogers, Arkansas in 1900. They returned to Minneapolis for a visit in 1904 and again in 1907.25
They had spent summers at Huntington Point on Lake Minnetonka while they live in Kenwood.3
Andrew’s Baptist Church (near 18th and Bryant Av S.) was the church that Andrew and Abby Potter had helped to establish when they and other memebers broke away from the First Baptist Church back in he 1880’s. 26

Address of the couple: 1866: 13th and Harmon, Minneapolis8
-1900: Kenwood Parkway
1900 until their deaths: Roger, Arkansas (405 Cherry St)27

MINNEAPOLIS CITY DIRECTORY:
1867: POTTER, A.R. merchant h. head Nicollet Island
HUNTINGTON W.W., merchant head Nicollet Island
1869: POTTER, A.R. salesman h. Harmon bt Cook & Freemont
HUNTINGTON W.W., bookkeeper Farnham & Co (lumber-St. Anthony)
h. Harmon bt Cook & Freemont
1871: Potter, A.R. and Huntington W.W. were not listed
1873-74: Potter A.R. not listed
HUNTINGTON,W.W., deputy treasurer, res. 6th St. bet 1st & 2d Av S
1874: Potter, A.R. not listed
HUNTINGTON, W.W. county Treasurer, County Court House, r. 107 S 6th St.
1875: POTTER, ANDREW R., supt Minneapolis Mill Co. Elevator, r. 11th cor Nicollet Av
HUNTINGTON, W.W. (Bisbee,Bardwell & Co.) and County Treasurer, Court House Bldg, r. 107 S. 6th
1876: POTTER, ANDREW R., supt Minneapolis Mill Co. Elevator 1st bet 7th & 8th Ave S.
r. 525 4th Ave S.
HUNTINGTON, W.W., county Treasurer, County Court House, r. 107 S. 6th
1877-78: POTTER, A.R., r. Harmon Pl co. 13th
HUNTINGTON, W.W. County Treasurer, County Court House,
r. Harmon Pl cor. 13
1879: POTTER, A.R., r. 1225 Harmon Pl
HUNTINGTON, W.W., lumber, r. 1225 Harmon Pl
1880: Potter, A.R. not listed
HUNTINGTON, W.W., r. 13th cor Harmon Pl
1880-81: Potter, A.R., not listed
HUNTINGTON, William W. r. Harmon Pl cor 15
1881-82: POTTER A.R. (Central Elevator Co.), b. 24 S 13th
HUNTINGTON, W.W. (Central Elevator Co.), r. 24 S. 13th
1882-83: POTTER, A.R., supt Central Elevator, r. 1323 Harmon Pl.
HUNTINGTON, W.W., real estate r. 1323 Harmon Pl.28

1889-91: POTTER, Andrew R. (Baker Potter, Co - real est. 803 Lumber Exchange [George L. Baker]) r. 1912 Kenwood Boulevard
HUNTINGTON, WW, pres of The Elevator Co., 410 S. 3rd; Western Ave cor of 12th; A.R. Potter is listed as the secretary and treasurer of The Elevator Co.29

Children: Nellie M. (1865-1950)
William Ransom (1868-1930)

1.3 Alla B. RANSOM30
Birth: about 1846, Michigan31

in Minneapolis: general store (Huntington & Potter at Hennepin & Washington), flour milling, lumbering, real estate, insurance,

in Rogers, Arkansas: realtor, land owner, director of one of the first railroads to be laid between Rogers and Bentonville.21

Andrew was the business partner of George L. Baker and Wm W. Huntington in a company called: BAKER, POTTER & CO. This was a Real Estate company located at 803 Lumber Exchange. (from the Davison’s Mpls City Directory of 1889-90) George L. Baker died on 23 March 1890.11
----------------
(from THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL, 24 March 1890, Monday Evening –Page One)


Census: 1860 June 21, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo (M653 roll 548, page 462)
House numbered 407, families numbered 404, line 14
Samuel H. Ransom, age 49, male, farmer, value of real estate: 20,000, value of personal estate: 5000, born in Vermont.
Eleanor B. Ransom, age 47, female, born in Vermont.
Aristine Ransom, age 19, female, born in Michigan.
Abby A. Ransom, age 16, female, born in Michigan.
Alla B. Ransom, age 14, female, born in Michigan.
Kitty G. Ransom [first name may be something else], age 12, female, born in Michigan.
William B. Ransom, age 9, male, born in Michigan.
Minnie L. Coe, age 19, female, born in New York.
All the children had attended school with in the year.
source: http://www.heritagequestonline.com/ 1 Nov 2003.
--------------------------------
1870 June 28, Census, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo page 64, line 25, Roll 680, page169R.
Ransom, S.H. age 59, Male, white, occupation: sand [can’t make out words], born in Vermont.
Ransom, Eleanor, age 57, female, white, occupation: keeping house, born in New York.
Ransom, Alli, age 24, female, white, occupation: at home, born in Michigan.
Ransom, Kate, age 22, female, white, occupation: at home, born in Michigan.
Ransom, Will, age 19, male, white, occupation: [hard to read, starts with ‘T’ may have ‘m’ or ‘n’ in middle and ‘n’ at the end], born in Michigan.
Nacb [hard to read], Mary, age 17, female, white, occupation: Domestic, born in Ireland.
Bishop, Jim, age 22, male, white, occupation: clerk, drygoods store, born in New York.
source: Library of Michigan http://envoy.libraryofmichigan.org/1870_census 1 Nov 2003.32

Spouse: George L. BAKER
Birth: 1837, Chelmsford, MA
Death: 23 March 1890, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co, MN, age: 53
Burial: Minneapolis, Hennepin Co, MN33
Burial Memo: Lakewood Cemetery, Site id: 73-10-4, date of death listed as 24 March 1890.

in Minneapolis: general store (Huntington & Potter at Hennepin & Washington), flour milling, lumbering, real estate, insurance,

in Rogers, Arkansas: realtor, land owner, director of one of the first railroads to be laid between Rogers and Bentonville.21

Andrew was the business partner of George L. Baker and Wm W. Huntington in a company called: BAKER, POTTER & CO. This was a Real Estate company located at 803 Lumber Exchange. (from the Davison’s Mpls City Directory of 1889-90) George L. Baker died on 23 March 1890.11
----------------
(from THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL, 24 March 1890, Monday Evening –Page One)

BY HIS OWN HAND
George L. Baker Takes His Life Premeditatedly.

A STRANGE INEXPLICABLE ACT

The Deed Committed in His Own Room at Noon Yesterday.

THE LETTER WRITTEN TO HIS WIFE

Insanity as the Result of Dyspeptic Insomnia the Only Tenable Theory as the Cause for His Act.

Strange indeed is life, stranger yet is death. Who of George L. Baker’s business associates, who of his personal friends, who, even of his own family, could have formed the thought on Saturday that before a day had passed he would be dead – and by his own hand? And yet that is what happened.

Look at the man’s environments. The thing seems inexplicable. Successful in business, happy in his domestic relations, honored by his fellow men, a communicant in a church whose office is to minister to the soul diseased – upon what logic could such a man end his own existence? For such a question men have but one answer and that is "insanity." It may be that to answer it thus is simple evasion, that it is merely another way of saying that the act seems irrational. Yet all the circumstances surrounding George L. Baker’s death yesterday noon – save the suicidal act itself – were rational.

He had just been attending service at the Fourth Baptist church which he had joined three weeks before. There was nothing strange or unusual in his demeanor, save that he was perhaps very earnest in his devotions. Immediately after the service, instead of remaining to share in the social greetings at the close of the service, as had been his wont, he returned to his pleasant home at 2215 Dupont av, leaving his wife and her mother at Sunday school. Upon returning home Mr. Baker put on a pair of neat slippers, substituted a smaller coat for his dress coat, and then sat down in the parlor and wrote a parting note to his wife. He was writing that last sad message when the servant girl opened the door and looked in to see who was there. The note was carefully and plainly written and in a hand which gave no indications of nervous excitement. The farewell missive was enclosed in an envelope and laid upon the stand. It was business like in tone and yet breathed a tender sentiment for his wife. It began "My beloved." He advised her to have the fire insurance policies with Gale & Co. transferred to her own name, asked her to pay some $200 outstanding debts out of his estate. He prayed that God might bless her and forgive him. "Goodbye, sweet one," the note concluded and the signature was simply "George."

Having thus written, he went into the bed chamber off the parlor, and, locking the doors, took up a 32-caliber, self-cocking Smith & Wesson revolver. Sitting upon the edge of the bed he placed the weapon in his mouth and fired. He fell over backward in the bed, and in an instant another chamber was discharged by the convulsive clutching of his fingers. The arm was outstretched and the second bullet passed through window. That was all. He had died almost instantly.

The servant was in the kitchen when she heard the reports. She tried to enter the bedroom, but could not. When she went outside and saw the bullet hole in the window glass she became excited, and, running toward the front of the house finally met Mrs. Baker and her aged mother. When they entered the bed room the terrible scene – the dead body and the blood escaping from the mouth, greeted them. Mrs. Baker experienced a shock from which it will take time to recover. When she grasped her husband’s hands she fancied she could feel pulsation.

Among the first to learn of the tragedy was Dr. J. F.FORCE, a neighbor, and from the latter’s residence the information was telephoned to Coroner Towers and police headquarters. Supt. BRACKETT had been a warm and intimate friend of Mr. Baker, and he could hardly credit the report. Half an hour later he was beside the lifeless body of the ex-police commissioner. A few minutes later Andrew R. POTTER and W.W. HUNTINGTON, Mr. Baker’s associates in the real estate business, were at the residence. These gentlemen, whose business and social relations had brought them in daily contact with Mr. Baker, were terribly shocked by his strange and unaccountable act. Late in the afternoon Maj. W. D. HALE, an intimate friend of Mr. Baker, and a relative by marriage, arrived at the residence in response to a message. He had known Mr. Baker ever since he came to Minneapolis, but he could offer no explanation. The coroner came, but it was so plainly a case of suicide that he deemed an inquest unnecessary.

There is only one theory of the suicide that seems tenable. Mr. Baker had had a deal of trouble with his stomach. It had made him pass sleepless nights. Last week –so he told his partner, A. R. POTTER- he had not slept more that two or three hours altogether. Only those who had suffered from insomnia know its tortures. It is said that one of its effects is to warp the judgement badly so that what in one’s sleep-refreshed moments would appear irrational, seems perfectly reasonable to one when troubled with insomnia. This seems to be the only explanation of one of the most sensational and inexplicable suicides that ever occurred in Minneapolis.

Among the business associates of Geo. L. Baker the opinion is prevalent that the contents of the pocketbook, upon the finding of which the unfortunate man attached so much importance in his farewell note are simply memoranda of small outstanding accounts, together with a note revealing the hiding place of his will. A. R. POTTER said this morning that he fancied the will was among Mr. Baker’s personal papers, which was locked up in this private drawer in the safe of Baker, Potter & Co. The will, if found will not be opened until after the funeral, but as the deceased was a careful, methodical business man, it will probably be found complete in every detail.

Mr. Potter, in speaking of the sad end of his late associate, said:
"Now, that I recall numerous moody remarks which Mr. Baker had made to me during the past week I can see that he was probably contemplating suicide. I thought nothing of these chance remarks at the time, but since the tragic occurrence of yesterday I can see that they had a terrific significance in the very calmness with which Mr. Baker gave them utterance."

The funeral services will occur tomorrow afternoon from the late residence in Highland Park. Rev. Milton F. NEGUS, pastor of the Fourth Baptist Church, will conduct the services. The remains will be interred in Lakewood, the pall bearers being chosen from among the late business associates and friends of the deceased.

A BUSY HONORABLE LIFE

Something About the History of the Dead Citizen.

George L. Baker was one of the best known and highly respected citizens of Minneapolis. He was born in the little village of Chelmsford, Mass. 53 years ago, but spent the happy days of his boyhood in Waterville, Me. His first employment was in a country store at the then village of Augusta, Me. In 1857, with his father’s family, he migrated to Minnesota and located at Cannon Falls, which was his home until 1866 and where he served as postmaster. In 1862 he enlisted in the 8th Minnesota, and in 1863 was transferred to the 4th colored infantry. He served as a lieutenant in those troops. He was afterwards detached, and was thereafter in the ordnance department of the army. He was mustered out in 1866, and returned to Cannon Falls. Shortly after he moved to this city, and was employed as a clerk in Bell Bros dry goods store. In ’73 in a partnership with J.A. WOLVERTON, he established on Nicollet av the first dry goods store established above Washington av. Mr. Baker was subsequently employed by C. C. WASHBURN & Co., and later was secretary of the Millers’ Association. He was then for five years connected with the North Star Woolen Mills.

Mr. Baker finally went into the real estate business with Messrs. A.R. POTTER and W.W. HUNTINGTON. He was chosen a member of the first board of police commissioners and served efficiently two years. Mr. Baker was married twice. His first wife was Miss Ella B. RANSOM, of Kalamazoo, Mich., whom he married in 1871. In 1880 he married Miss May BARKER, of Chicago. Deceased was a member of the Loyal Legion but never belonged to the G.A.R. He was also a Mason of standing and was a director in the recently organized Business Men’s union as well as a member of the board of trade. He leaves no children to inherit an estate valued at about $200,000.22

Marr: 1871

1.4 Clarissa / Kitty G./Kate RANSOM34,35,36
Birth: about 1848, Michigan37

From the Morgan Potter biography: “....Abbie was married a day after her older sister, Laura, married Andrew Potter’s best friend Westal Huntington. They were both married in Kalamazoo by the Rev. Jeremiah Hall, D.D. who was the brother-in-law of the two sisters, he being married to Clarissa Ransom.” 3

Census: 1860 June 21, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo (M653 roll 548, page 462)
House numbered 407, families numbered 404, line 14
Samuel H. Ransom, age 49, male, farmer, value of real estate: 20,000, value of personal estate: 5000, born in Vermont.
Eleanor B. Ransom, age 47, female, born in Vermont.
Aristine Ransom, age 19, female, born in Michigan.
Abby A. Ransom, age 16, female, born in Michigan.
Alla B. Ransom, age 14, female, born in Michigan.
Kitty G. Ransom [first name may be something else], age 12, female, born in Michigan.
William B. Ransom, age 9, male, born in Michigan.
Minnie L. Coe, age 19, female, born in New York.
All the children had attended school with in the year.
source: http://www.heritagequestonline.com/ 1 Nov 2003.
--------------------------------
1870 June 28, Census, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo page 64, line 25, Roll 680, page169R.
Ransom, S.H. age 59, Male, white, occupation: sand [can’t make out words], born in Vermont.
Ransom, Eleanor, age 57, female, white, occupation: keeping house, born in New York.
Ransom, Alli, age 24, female, white, occupation: at home, born in Michigan.
Ransom, Kate, age 22, female, white, occupation: at home, born in Michigan.
Ransom, Will, age 19, male, white, occupation: [hard to read, starts with ‘T’ may have ‘m’ or ‘n’ in middle and ‘n’ at the end], born in Michigan.
Nacb [hard to read], Mary, age 17, female, white, occupation: Domestic, born in Ireland.
Bishop, Jim, age 22, male, white, occupation: clerk, drygoods store, born in New York.
source: Library of Michigan http://envoy.libraryofmichigan.org/1870_census 1 Nov 2003.32

Spouse: Jeremiah HALL3

From the Morgan Potter biography: “....Abbie was married a day after her older sister, Laura, married Andrew Potter’s best friend Westal Huntington. They were both married in Kalamazoo by the Rev. Jeremiah Hall, D.D. who was the brother-in-law of the two sisters, he being married to Clarissa Ransom.” 3


1.5 William B. RANSOM30
Birth: about 1851, Michigan38

Census: 1860 June 21, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo (M653 roll 548, page 462)
House numbered 407, families numbered 404, line 14
Samuel H. Ransom, age 49, male, farmer, value of real estate: 20,000, value of personal estate: 5000, born in Vermont.
Eleanor B. Ransom, age 47, female, born in Vermont.
Aristine Ransom, age 19, female, born in Michigan.
Abby A. Ransom, age 16, female, born in Michigan.
Alla B. Ransom, age 14, female, born in Michigan.
Kitty G. Ransom [first name may be something else], age 12, female, born in Michigan.
William B. Ransom, age 9, male, born in Michigan.
Minnie L. Coe, age 19, female, born in New York.
All the children had attended school with in the year.
source: http://www.heritagequestonline.com/ 1 Nov 2003.
--------------------------------
1870 June 28, Census, Michigan, Kalamazoo county, village of Kalamazoo page 64, line 25, Roll 680, page169R.
Ransom, S.H. age 59, Male, white, occupation: sand [can’t make out words], born in Vermont.
Ransom, Eleanor, age 57, female, white, occupation: keeping house, born in New York.
Ransom, Alli, age 24, female, white, occupation: at home, born in Michigan.
Ransom, Kate, age 22, female, white, occupation: at home, born in Michigan.
Ransom, Will, age 19, male, white, occupation: [hard to read, starts with ‘T’ may have ‘m’ or ‘n’ in middle and ‘n’ at the end], born in Michigan.
Nacb [hard to read], Mary, age 17, female, white, occupation: Domestic, born in Ireland.
Bishop, Jim, age 22, male, white, occupation: clerk, drygoods store, born in New York.
source: Library of Michigan http://envoy.libraryofmichigan.org/1870_census 1 Nov 2003.32


Sources

1. GAYLOR, Charlotte Potter (daughter of Morgan & Grace Potter) handwritten ancestor chart for Morgan Huntington Potter/ added in October 2003.
2. GAYLOR, Charlotte Potter (daughter of Morgan & Grace Potter) handwritten ancestor chart for Morgan Huntington Potter/ added in October 2003 “Eleanor BOYD GODDARD”.
3. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 30.
4. Cemetery/Head Stone http://www.lakewoodcemetery.com/f_welcome.htm (12 October 2003) age 64.
5. “Census.” 1860 Michigan (age 19, born in MI) 1 Nov 2003.
6. “Census.” 1900 MN Census - Heritage Quest Online, (10 Nov 2003) Jan 1841 - MI.
7. Cemetery/Head Stone http://www.lakewoodcemetery.com/f_welcome.htm (12 October 2003).
8. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 31.
9. Cemetery/Head Stone http://www.lakewoodcemetery.com/f_welcome.htm (12 October 2003) age 74.
10. “Census.” 1900 MN Census - Heritage Quest Online, (10 Nov 2003) Nov 1840 - NY.
11. City Directory Davison’s Minneapolis City Directory, 1889-90.
12. Obituary Rogers Democrat 7-5-1917.
13. INTERNET SOURCE Benton Co, AR Cemetery Index (http://www.rootsweb.com/~arbenton/bccpg/bentc118.htm) 14 Sept 2003.
14. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page30.
15. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 79.
16. Obituary Rogers Democrat 6-6-1912.
17. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 25-26.
18. INTERNET SOURCE http://www.michiganinthewar.org/cavalry/4cavh.htm (8 November 2003).
19. INTERNET SOURCE http://www.rogersarkansas.com/cemetery/results.asp?NAME=Pott... (14 Sept 2003).
20. GAYLOR, Charlotte Potter (daughter of Morgan & Grace Potter) From a handwritten ancestor chart for Morgan Huntington Potter, the mother of Emory Bishop Morgan is listed as “Phoebe Blood”. In Rick Morgan’s book about the Morgan family, Phoebe Blood is the wife of Lorenzo Morgan, the brother of Emory Bishop Morgan. .
21. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 78.
22. “newspaper clipping.” 1890 March 24, THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
23. INTERNET SOURCE http://www.michiganinthewar.org/cavalry/4thcav.htm (8 November 2003).
24. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page31.
25. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 18.
26. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 183.
27. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, pagae 79.
28. City Directory look-up done 23 August 2000 @MHS.
29. INTERNET SOURCE Mpls City Directory 1889-91 Database on Ancestry.com.
30. “Census.” 1860 Michigan.
31. “Census.” 1860 Michigan (age 14, born in MI) 1 Nov 2003.
32. INTERNET SOURCE http://envoy.libraryofmichigan.org/1870_census - 1 Nov 2003.
33. INTERNET SOURCE http://www.lakewoodcemetery.com/f_welcome.htm (1 Nov 2003).
34. Morgan H.Potter, “I was Born Under an Umbrella”, 1980, page 30 (Clarissa).
35. “Census.” 1860 Michigan (Kitty G.) 1 Nov 2003.
36. INTERNET SOURCE 1870 Michigan (Kate) 1 Nov 2003.
37. “Census.” 1860 Michigan (age 12) 1 Nov 2003.
38. “Census.” 1860 Michigan (age 9, born in MI) 1 Nov 2003.

Index

BAKER
George L. spouse of 1.3
BEACH
Laura A. parent of spouse of 1
FLETCHER
Lucinda parent of 1
GODDARD
Abbie A. parent of spouse of 1.1
Eleanor Beach/Boyd spouse of 1
Pling (Pliny-Phiny) parent of spouse of 1
HALL
Jeremiah spouse of 1.4
HUNTINGTON
Jonas parent of spouse of 1.1
Westal W spouse of 1.1
POTTER
Andrew Robinson spouse of 1.2
John Esquire parent of spouse of 1.2
Nellie M. child of 1.2
William Ransom child of 1.2
RANSOM
Abby Augusta 1.2
Alla B. 1.3
Clarissa / Kitty G./Kate 1.4
Major Ezekiel parent of 1
Laura Aristine 1.1
Samuel H. 1
William B. 1.5
ROBINSON
Ruth L. parent of spouse of 1.2


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