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Sullivan's in County Cork, Ireland

Replies: 22

Lord of Beareheaven Daniel O'Sullivan, Owen O'Sullivan, Phillip O'Sullivan, John Sullivan b. 1692 Limeric

Posted: 12 Aug 2002 10:32PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Sullivan
Lord of Bearehaven Daniel O'Sullivan

First Generation
1. Lord of Bearehaven Daniel O'Sullivan.

Taken from http://www.bearatourism.com/osullvn/hist.htm -

The origin of the name O?Sullivan

The surname O?Sullivan or in Irish Ó Súilleabháin traces its origin from Milesians, King of the Milesians
(or Celts), King of Spain through the line of his son, Heber, first absolute King of Ireland 504 BC. The
surname O?Sullivan is derived from the words Súil (eye) and abháin, (one) and in its Irish form Ó
Súillabháin means descendant of the one eyed or descendant of the hawk-eyed. The O?Sullivans were
descendants of Eoghan (Owen) Mór, the father of the famous Olioll Olum, celebrated King of Munster
in the third Century. Olioll Olum had three sons, Eoghan, Cormac Cais and Cian, and by his will he
commanded that the kingdom should be ruled alternately by one of the descendants of Eoghan and
Cormac Cais. From Eoghan, the eldest son of Olioll Olum was descended the Eoganachts or Eugenians,
who were styled Kings of Cashel. The Eoghanachts possessed Desmond or south Munster, the present
counties of Cork and Kerry; they also held most of the present country of Tipperary. The O?Sullivans
were one of the principal families of the race of Eogan or Eoghanacht (i.e. descendants of Eoghan) of
Munster. There were three principal branches of the O?Sullivan Clan:-

1. O?Sullivan Beara: This branch of the family had the ancient territory of Beara now the baronies of
Beare and Bantry in the county of Cork, and were called O?Sullivan Beara and styled princes of Beara.

2. O?Sullivan Mór: This branch of the family were lords of Dunkerron, and possessed the barony of
Dunkerron near the river Kenmare, and their chief seat was the castle of Dunkerron.

3. O?Sullivan of Croc Raffan: This branch of the O?Sullivans were chiefs of Knockgraffan in Tipperary
and the territory they possessed in Tipperary was situated in the barony of Middlethird, between Cashel
and Cahir.

The O?Sullivan family motto is Lamh foistenach abu meaning ?The steady hand to victory?.

The name O?Sullivan and its variant forms are the third most numerous surname in Ireland. There are
an estimated 41,500 bearers of the name resident in the island at the present time. However, we must
not forget that there are possibly ten times that total of O?Sullivans living outside the shores of Ireland,
in the two Americas, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, England, Europe, the African Continent and to a
lesser extent Asia and the rest of the world. There is an O?Sullivan family in every county in Ireland,
but the main branch of the family is associated with the province of Munster.
___________________________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively
multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,
original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an
ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never
heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod
McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she
was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.

They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is
added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."

Daniel had the following children:

+ 2 M i. Owen O'Sullivan.

Second Generation
2. Owen O'Sullivan(Daniel).

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively
multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,

original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an
ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never
heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem- ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is
added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."


He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."


Owen married Marydaughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney.

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively
multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.


John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,
original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an
ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never
heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod
McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she
was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is
added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."

Owen and Mary had the following children:

+ 3 M i. Phillip O'Sullivan was born Abt 1640. He died Aft 1691.

Third Generation
3. Phillip O'Sullivan(Owen, Daniel) was born Abt 1640 in Ardee, Louth, Ireland. He died Aft 1691 in France?.

From: riobardodwyer <riobardodwyer@eircom.net>
To: <angiesullivan@earthlink.net>
Date: 7/21/02 3:06:00 PM
Subject: O'Sullivan family line.

Dear Angie, That was a fascinating, huge email you sent me. For a few minutes I was on the verge of
deleting it before opening it. Because of the appendage/attachment sign on to it and the fact of it
taking so long to come in, I was "sure" it was only another one of the many viruses with which we have
been plagued for some time back. I had another two emails above it to play around with. So I deleted
the one nearest to it, and then your covering letter showed up, which showed that what would be in
the attachment was genuine. Had you not put in that first covering letter, I would have deleted the lot
and you would have been wondering why I wasn't answering you.

I deal with the Co. Cork section of the Beara Peninsula ----- which takes in the most of it. But what you
are looking for is the section of the O'Sullivan Bere sept in the Lauragh/Ardea district of the Tuosist
Parish, Co. Kerry, and going right in to the area around Kenmare. The expert on that Co. Kerry section
of the O'Sullivan Sept (and also on the McCarthys and the general history of that area) is Mr. Gerard
Lyne M.A., c/o National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2, Ireland. He is a native of the
Tuosist Parish and has contributed many articles to the Kerry Historical Society's Journals over the
years. Very recently he gave an excellent Lecture in Castletownbere entitled "The Kerry Lordship of
O'Sullivan Bere", on the occasion of the 400th anniversary of the Siege of Dunboy. His Lecture would
have covered alot of what you were looking for. I was hoping that I might be able to get Gerard's email
for you from Connie Murphy, Vice-Chairman of the Beara Historical Society. I have been trying for the
past two days to get Connie on the phone, but he seems to be away on holidays.

So, under the circumstances, your best bet would be to get in touch by letter with Gerard at the above
address. He may still have a copy of that Lecture, and may be able to add alot more. You could send
him what you had in the email, and take it from there. A descendant of that Tuosist, Co. Kerry, section
of the O'Sullivan Bere's came to Castletownbere, and his descendants were/and are known as the
Masters (Schoolmasters). I have the Co. Kerry (and later the Co. Cork section) part of those
O'Sullivans covered in my book "Who were my Ancestors ? Castletownbere Parish". The coverage of the
Lauragh/Ardea (Tuosist Parish, County Kerry) section of that family goes back to a schoolmaster
Patrick O'Sullivan (1720-1800). One of this section, General John O'Sullivan, was on George
Washington's Staff during the War of Independence. His brother was later Governor James O'Sullivan of
Massachusetts (incl. at the time the State of Maine). Another descendant was later Superior Court
Judge for the State of Massachusetts. If you would like to purchase a copy of the book, it costs $50 U.S.
overall (cost of book, packing, and postage by surface mail, which usually takes 4/5 weeks to be
delivered in the States). A personal check will do provided it is drawn on a Bank (not a Credit Union ----
which will not be cashed by a Bank here; new regulations). My home address is: Riobard O'Dwyer
(Genealogist), Eyeries Village, Beara Peninsula, Co. Cork, Ireland.
Very best wishes, Riobard (= the Gaelic for Robert)
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestral file, IGI File, July 18, 2002 -

Philip O'SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: Abt. 1640
Ardee, Louth, Ireland

Parents:
Relatives:
Walter Scott SULLIVAN
_______________________________

Taken from http://james_clan.tripod.com/d0006/g0000002.html#I4072 -

Phillip O'SULLIVAN
____ - 1691
* DEATH: 1691, France
Father: Owen O'SULLIVAN
Family 1 : Joanne MCCARTHY
1. +Owen O'SULLIVAN
2. Dermot O'SULLIVAN
_________________________________

INDEX

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively
multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,
original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an
ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never
heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod
McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she
was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is
added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

1 Phillip O'SULLIVAN b: BET 1633-1666 d: AFT ___ 1691
+ Joane MCCARTHY b: BET 1641-1668 d: BET 1693-1756
2 John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 d: 1790
+ Margery BROWN b: 1714 d: 1801
3 Benjamin SULLIVAN b: BEF ___ 1740 d: BEF ___ 1776
3 Daniel SULLIVAN b: BEF ___ 1740
+ Abigail BEAN
4 Rachel SULLIVAN
4 James SULLIVAN
4 Hannah SULLIVAN
4 Mary SULLIVAN
4 Lydia SULLIVAN
4 John SULLIVAN
3 John SULLIVAN b: 17 FEB 1739 d: 23 JAN 1795
+ Lydia Remick WORSTER
4 Lydia SULLIVAN
4 John SULLIVAN
4 James SULLIVAN
4 George SULLIVAN
3 James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 d: 10 DEC 1808
+ Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748 d: 26 JUN 1786
4 James SULLIVAN b: 1754 d: 27 AUG 1825
+ Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 d: 15 DEC 1847
5 Samuel SULLIVAN
5 John SULLIVAN
5 James SULLIVAN
5 Owen SULLIVAN
5 Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 d: 1 JUL 1872
+ Jane CATHEY d: 1825 BEF
6 George Logan SULLIVAN b: 1820 d: 1877
+ Mary Adeline HAUSS b: 1822 d: 1894
7 John F. SULLIVAN b: OCT 1846
+ Catherine HAYES b: MAY 1846 d: BEF 7 JAN 1920
8 Charles SULLIVAN b: AUG 1871
+ Minnie _____ b: DEC 1871
8 Mary E. SULLIVAN b: JUL 1877
8 Fannie G. SULLIVAN b: NOV 1879
8 Maggie E. SULLIVAN b: JUN 1882
8 _____ SULLIVAN
8 _____ SULLIVAN
8 _____ SULLIVAN d: BEF 1900
8 _____ SULLIVAN d: BEF 1900
7 Frances Jane SULLIVAN b: 1847
+ Monroe LINGLE
7 Allison SULLIVAN b: 1849
7 James A. SULLIVAN b: 1853
+ Alace M. BROWN b: 1856
8 George Logan SULLIVAN b: 1879
8 Mary Irene SULLIVAN b: MAY 1880
7 George Andrew SULLIVAN b: 30 NOV 1857 d: 9 APR 1915
+ Mildred Louisa SHARPE b: AUG 1862
8 Dannie SULLIVAN
8 Effie SULLIVAN
+ Bryan HARTLEY
8 Jess SULLIVAN
8 Robert SULLIVAN
8 Maude SULLIVAN
+ Ira JUSTICE
8 James Monroe SULLIVAN b: 29 JAN 1880 d: 14 JAN 1965
+ Myrtle Caroline RASH b: 13 JUN 1885 d: 17 MAR 1940
7 Charles William (Will) SULLIVAN b: 1861 d: 1932
+ Margaret (Maggie) STEELE
8 George Walter SULLIVAN b: 27 SEP 1894 d: 8 JAN 1965
+ Mary OSBORNE
8 Lucy SULLIVAN
+ Thomas Finley HAWKINS
8 Charlie SULLIVAN d: 1935
7 Susan Victoria SULLIVAN b: 26 OCT 1863 d: 8 MAY 1944
+ William Wesley BUSH b: 5 JUL 1856 d: 10 MAY 1930
8 Andrew Houck BUSH b: 3 DEC 1891 d: 17 NOV 1979
+ Billy MOORE b: 23 OCT 1898 d: 4 SEP 1978
9 Fred BUSH b: 24 OCT 1919 d: 25 JUN 1927
8 E L BUSH b: 11 JAN 1894 d: 26 FEB 1894
8 Logan Gwynn BUSH b: 2 MAY 1895 d: 28 SEP 1966
+ Toy Mae CHILDERS b: 5 MAY 1900 d: 20 JAN 1978
9 William Hearon BUSH b: 11 SEP 1917 d: 7 JUL 1989
9 Luther Hicks BUSH b: 27 APR 1919 d: 4 JAN 1994
8 Bryan Jennings BUSH b: 26 JUL 1896 d: 6 AUG 1988
+ Florence Sue HEFFNER b: 13 FEB 1898 d: 10 JUN 1920
9 Eleanor Sue BUSH b: 4 DEC 1919 d: 7 JAN 1993
+ Ollie Floyd HOWELL b: 27 NOV 1912 d: 16 MAY 1986
10 Eleanor Anne HOWELL b: 4 JUN 1942 d: 4 JUN 1942
+ Americus Myrtle CLEMENTS b: 1897 d: JUL 1968
+ Ruth SELLEY b: 6 FEB 1899 d: 5 JAN 1990
8 Flowers D. BUSH b: 23 SEP 1900 d: 19 NOV 1900
8 Joseph Ivy BUSH b: 17 JAN 1902 d: 6 JAN 1980
9 Joseph Ivy BUSH b: 20 APR 1924 d: 23 AUG 1943
+ Nancy Lee BONNER b: 16 FEB 1909 d: 19 MAY 2001
8 Clinard Steele BUSH b: 16 SEP 1905 d: 17 JUN 1907
8 Virgil Boyd BUSH b: 19 FEB 1909 d: AUG 1981
+ Fern HIXON b: 9 NOV 1911 d: 10 FEB 1961
7 Dock Scroggs SULLIVAN b: MAR 1868
+ Alice M. HARTLEY
8 Lloyd G. SULLIVAN b: MAR 1894
8 Annie SULLIVAN b: APR 1896
8 Fred SULLIVAN b: MAR 1898
+ Gullie _____ b: SEP 1865
+ Catherine SPRATT b: 5 DEC 1798
6 Charles Coatsworth SULLIVAN b: 1836
+ Martha _____ b: 1836
7 Nancy J. SULLIVAN b: 1861
7 Dora SULLIVAN b: 1867
6 Nancy Jane SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1829 d: 1 JAN 1850
+ John E. HOKE b: 1 AUG 1819 d: 10 AUG 1872
7 Franklin Joseph HOKE b: 20 NOV 1849 d: 13 OCT 1897
5 Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 d: 3 AUG 1851
+ Sarah SULLIVAN b: 1807 d: 1880 AFT
6 Martha J. SULLIVAN b: 1832
+ John CORNWELL b: 1833
7 Charles C. CORNWELL b: 1853
+ Bettie _____ b: 1854
8 Mary Jane CORNWELL b: APR 1880
7 Wade H. CORNWELL b: 1858
7 Ellen CORNWELL b: 1863
7 John CORNWELL b: 1866
7 Thomas CORNWELL b: 1869
7 Laura CORNWELL b: 1873
7 Emma CORNWELL b: 1876
6 Morris SULLIVAN b: 1833
6 Sarah A. SULLIVAN b: 1835
6 Matilda SULLIVAN b: 1838
6 James Erwin SULLIVAN b: 1846
6 Frances Adelaide SULLIVAN b: 1848
6 Alice J. SULLIVAN b: 1851
+ Monroe DELLINGER b: 1851
7 Robert DELLINGER b: 1873
7 Charles Lester DELLINGER b: 1876
7 Grier DELLINGER b: 1878
7 Beatrice DELLINGER b: DEC 1879
6 Jasper SULLIVAN b: 1856
6 Pinkey SULLIVAN b: 1858
5 Sarah SULLIVAN
5 Mary SULLIVAN
4 William SULLIVAN
4 John SULLIVAN
4 Richard SULLIVAN
4 Bant SULLIVAN
4 Nancy SULLIVAN
4 Hettie SULLIVAN
+ Johnathan AMORY
4 George SULLIVAN
+ Martha LANGDON
3 Mary SULLIVAN b: 1752
3 Ebenezer SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 d: 3 JUN 1799
+ Abigail COTTON

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Add Post-em
* ID: I9756
* Name: Phillip O'SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BET 1633-1666 in Ardea, Ireland 1
* Death: AFT ___ 1691 1
Marriage 1 Joane MCCARTHY b: BET 1641-1668
Children
1. [Has Children] John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland

Sources:

1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
______________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I34117
* Name: Philip O'Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1691
* Note:
[swla2002.FTW]

[NEW.GED]

[SWLA.FTW]

[Genealogy.com, LLC WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585, Date of Import: Oct 30, 2000]

Major Phiulip O'Sullivan of Ardea, who after the loss of Limerick in 1691 to William of Orange, became
an exile in France and there he died soon after from a wound inflicted by a French officer. (from A
General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore)

Marriage 1 Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668


* Married: WFT Est. 1658-1689

Children

1. [Has Children] John Sullivan b: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland

Phillip married Joane McCarthydaughter of Dermond McCarthy and _______ Reagh. Joane was born Between 1641 - 1668 in Ireland?.

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively
multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,
original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an
ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never
heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod
McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she
was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is
added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I34117
* Name: Philip O'Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1691
* Note:
[swla2002.FTW]

[NEW.GED]

[SWLA.FTW]

[Genealogy.com, LLC WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585, Date of Import: Oct 30, 2000]

Major Phiulip O'Sullivan of Ardea, who after the loss of Limerick in 1691 to William of Orange, became
an exile in France and there he died soon after from a wound inflicted by a French officer. (from A
General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore)

Marriage 1 Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668
* Married: WFT Est. 1658-1689

Children
1. [Has Children] John Sullivan b: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland


Phillip and Joane had the following children:

+ 4 M i. John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivanwas born 17 Jun 1690 or 1691. He died 20 Jun 1795.

Fourth Generation

4. John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan(Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born 17 Jun 1690 or 1691 in Limerick or Ardea, Kerry Co., Ireland. He died 20 Jun 1795 in Berwick, York, Massachusetts.

Taken from ancestry.com on August 12, 2002 -

New England Irish Pioneers [Print]
Viewing records 1-3 of 3 Matches


Pioneer Irish in New England
CHAPTER IV
page 70
Despite the various authorities before quoted as to Daniels nationality, some may question the
statement that he was an Irishman. And while nothing can be found on record that would explain it
more clearly than is here stated, it is the opinion of leading Gaelic scholars that the recorded forms of
his name were only crude attempts to take down the phonetic pronunciation of Ua Suileabbain
(OSullivan),The name Sullivan also appears in the records of other colonies in such forms as Suiflan,
Shoolavaw, Shulavan, Shulavay, Sillivan, Suelevane and Swil-livawn. John Sullivan, father of General
John Sullivan of the Revolution, appears in Dover, N.H., town records in 1723 as Sullefund and Sullyfun,
and one Donogh OSullivan who lived in Talbot County, Maryland, in 1675, was recorded Donoch
Osoulla..39 from the lips of an Irish speaker with a superficial knowledge of English, and who
consequently could not explain the meaning of his name or its spelling in English. The pronunciation of
the prefix Ua in Irish names cannot be produced correctly by any combination of letters in English. The
English-speaking person can learn these sounds only from a native speaker by ear, and even then the
tongue will generally trip up in the effort to pronounce them. The prefix O in English is a poor attempt
at giving anything like a satisfactory rendering of the Gaelic Ua, which means a descendant or
grandson. It is this difficulty that often confronted the early American recording officers, who produced
for us a metamorphosis in so many Irish family names that now makes them almost unintelligible. The
second part of the name, Suil-dubh-ain, means the dark-eyed person; the name is written Suileabh-ain
and is pronounced Sool-awhaain; the termination, ain, a
View full context
____________________________________________

Taken from - http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/7334/7334_102.htm...=
1027491076
A History of the Town of Sullivan, New Hampshire, Volume I
IV, John Sullivan.

It would be in place here to say a few words about John Sullivan for whom the town of Sullivan was
named. For lack of space, however, we shall not repeat what was said by the author in his oration at
the Sullivan Centennial.(*) Since that oration was delivered, it has been discovered(+) that the birth-
place of John Sullivan was Somersworth, N. H., where his father was teaching and where his family
were passing the winter. All the gazetteers and biographical dictionaries had given the place of birth as
Berwick, Me. (near Great Falls), very naturally, because his father had his residence there for 50 years
or more. This father was named Owen Sullivan (originally O'Sullivan), the etymology of which word we
have already explained.?? Owen was descended from a very illustrious family of pure Irish blood.
His ancestors lived at Ardea in Ireland, in the county of Kerry. He reckoned among his ancestors
several old Irish lords and persons of great distinction, who traced their pedigree through 30 or
more generations. Owen was highly educated and spoke several languages. Through the influence of
Rev. Mr. Moody of Portsmouth and other gentlemen of distinction in New Hampshire, he was
introduced to the best families and taught publicly and privately for many years. He died at his Berwick
home, on Saturday, June 20, 1795, at the age of 105 years and three days, having been born in
Ireland, (*) See pages 14 to 16 of this volume. (+) For autherities see address of Rev. A. H. Quint, D.

Ireland, (*) See pages 14 to 16 of this volume. (+) For autherities see address of Rev. A. H. Quint, D.
D., delivered at the dedication of a monument to John Sullivan, on the site of the old Durham
meetinghorse, in the published proceedings, entitled "Dedication of the Sullivan Monument, at Durham,
N. H., Sept. 27, 1894". ?? See page 119. Page 160 on June 17, 1690. He had four sons in the
Revolution, and two, John of New Hampshire, and James of Massachusetts, were governors (the
proper title of John however, at that particular time, was president). Mary, the only daughter, married
Theophilus Hardy, and was the ancestress of Gov. Samuel Wells of Maine. Special particulars relating to
John Sullivan were given in the Centennial oration. His mother's name appears to have been Margery
(for Margaret) Browne. It is worthy of note with how many events and institutions our John Sullivan
was connected as first. A distinguished royalist, formerly of Portsmouth, Peter Livius, in a letter,
very properly charges him with being the first to incite armed resistance to Great Britain in the colonies
of America. He alluded to Sullivan's efforts in seizing the powder and ammunition at Fort William and
Mary, at New Castle, and secreting them under the pulpit of the old Durham meetinghouse. He
was instrumental in establishing for New Hampshire her first constitution, which was the first adopted
by any of the states, on seceding from the government of Great Britain. As president of the "
Convention to ratify the Constitution of the United States", it became his unique duty to proclaim that
vote by which the great instrument was ratified by New Hampshire and which had the still further
significance that, as this was the ninth state to ratify, it made possible the United States of
America. He was one of New Hampshire's electors of the first President of the United States. He was
the first president of the New Hampshire branch of the Cincinnati, of which George Washington was the
first president-general. He was the first Grand Master of the New Hampshire Grand Lodge of Free and
Accepted Masons. He was also appointed by President Washington as the first judge of the United
States District Court of New Hampshire.
_____________________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...=
Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick, Ireland, 1692; school
master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801; Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the
Major General in the Revolution), James (Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist.
Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376, Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://james_clan.tripod.com/d0002/g0000007.html#I3826 -

Owen O'SULLIVAN
[N608]
17 Jun 1690 - 20 Jun 1795
* BIRTH: 17 Jun 1690, Ardea, Kerry Co., Ireland
* DEATH: 20 Jun 1795, Berwick, York Co., Massachusetts (Maine)
Father: Phillip O'SULLIVAN
Mother: Joanne MCCARTHY
Family 1 : Margery BROWNE
* MARRIAGE: 1735
1. +Benjamin SULLIVAN
2. +Daniel SULLIVAN
3. +John SULLIVAN
4. +James SULLIVAN
5. Mary SULLIVAN
6. +Ebenezer Moses SULLIVAN
________________________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively
multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,
original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an

ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never
heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod
McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she
was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is
added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.



Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."
__________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.seacoastnh.com/framers/sullivan.html -

JOHN SULLIVAN was one of the best known New Hampshire figures in the Revolution, but he was also
one of the most controversial.

Sullivan was born in the parish of Somersworth on February 17, 1740, the third son of Irish
redemptioner immigrants. His father was the local schoolmaster and he made sure his son received a
good education. Sullivan read the law with Samuel Livermore, and in 1764 he bought three acres on
the bank of the Oyster River in Durham and hung out his shingle there, becoming the town's first
lawyer.

Extremely controversial in his day, Somersworth?s John Sullivan became the first "president" of New
Hampshire. He served three terms in the role we now call governor. Sullivan cut his teeth as a young
lawyer in Portsmouth, NH and became the first attorney in Durham. His goal in life was to be wealthy
and his litigious pursuit of debtors in his hometown led to angry mobs surrounding his house. He
served courageously, some say brazenly, in Revolutionary War battles, though he had been a friend of
exiled British NH governor John Wentworth, whom he later replaced. Captured by the British, Sullivan
became a courier between the two sides for which he was severely criticized. Sullivan joined the
Seacoast NH uprising at Fort William and Mary in 1774, then served in a number of failed battles.
George Washington was not fond of Sullivan, but called on him often. Major General Sullivan was
among the troops at Quebec, and a leader at Trenton, Brandywine and Germantown. Washington
called on him again in 1779 to literally wipe out all Native American settlements that threatened
colonists in New York and Pennsylvania. Sullivan?s March, as it was called, devastated Indian
populations there as his troops destroyed all native housing and crops. He served in both the first and
second Continental Congress. After the war he returned to his law practice and was made a federal
judge, though he was often too ill, often from alcohol, to serve. The NH town and county of Sullivan
are among the many places dedicated in his name.
_________________________________________

Taken from --- http://www.seacoastnh.com/brewster/27.html

By Charles W. Brewster

Editors Note: C.W. Brewster was a Portsmouth columnist in the mid-1800's. This article includes his
opinions and may not reflect current research or current values.
JDR

John Sullivan-The house boy--His first law case--His advancement--His sail on the Piscataqua.

Read more about John Sullivan

HAVING given a hasty sketch of the history of the Livermore mansion, we will go back a few years to
take a more familiar view of the old occupants.

It was not far from the year 1758, that a lad of seventeen years, with a rough dress, might have been
seen knocking at the door of this house, and asking for the Squire, who listens to his application, and
inquires: "And what can you do, my lad, if I take you?" "Oh, I can split the wood, take care of the
horse, attend to the gardening, and perhaps find some spare time to read a little, if you can give me
the privilege."

John Sullivan, for that was the name he gave, appeared to be a promising lad, and so he was received
into Mr. Livermore's kitchen, and was entrusted with various matters relating to the work of the house
and the stable. Mr. L., finding him intelligent, encouraged his desire to read by furnishing from his
library any books he wished; and with this privilege he improved every leisure moment. Libraries then
were not so extensive as now, but the position of Mr. L. gave him a very good one for the times, and

among them the most choice legal works of the day. John was permitted at times to take a seat in the
library room, and he had the care of it in Mr. Livermore's absence.

One evening there had been some trouble in the town, which resulted in a fight. As has been the
custom in later days, so then the party which fared the worse prosecuted the other for assault and
battery. The case was to be brought before Deacon Penhallow (at his house on the south-east corner
of Pleasant and Court streets). The best legal talents were needed for the defence, to save the culprit
from the stinging disgrace of being placed in the stocks--in those formidable pieces of timber which
were standing for years near the south-east corner of the old North church. The defendant at once
resorted to the office of Mr. Livermore. He was absent, and John was reading in the library alone. The
man, supposing that any one from an office so celebrated might answer his purpose, asked John if he
would not undertake his case. John, on the whole, concluded to go, and, leaving word in the kitchen
that he should be absent awhile, trudged off with his client. He soon learnt the merits of the case, and
having given some attention to the law books, and acquired some knowledge of the forms of trial, he
had confidence that he might gain the case. The charges were made; the blackened eyes and bruises
were shown, and the case looked very doubtful for John's client.

While this trial was going on, Mr. Livermore returned from his journey; and on inquiring for John to
take care of the horse, was told that he had gone off to Deacon Penhallow's to a court. Mr. L.'s
curiosity was excited. He put the horse in the stable, and, without awaiting his supper, slipped into a
room adjoining the court, and, without being seen by the parties, listened to the trial. John had just
commenced his argument, which was managed with good tact, and exhibited native talent and as
much knowledge of law as some regular practitioners. John was successful, his client was acquitted,
and John received here his first court fee.

Mr. L. returned as obscurely as he entered. The next morning the young man was called into the library
room, and thus addressed: "John, my kitchen is no place for you; follow on in your studies, give them
your undivided attention, and you shall have what assistance you need from me until you are in
condition to repay it."

The result is well-known. John Sullivan became eminent at the bar, became conspicuous as General in
the war of the Revolution, and, after the peace, was for three years President of New Hampshire. He
was afterwards District Judge. He died at Durham in 1795, at the age of fifty-four.

Gen. Sullivan was of Irish descent. His father was born in Limerick in 1692, came to Berwick, Me., as
early as the year 1723, and died in 1796, aged one hundred and four years. His mother came over
several years after, from Cork. She was born in 1714, and died in 1801, aged eighty-seven. Her mind
was of a rough though noble cast. The father's education was good, and together they enjoyed
honorable poverty in early life. When on her passage to this country, a fellow passenger jocosely said
to her: What do you expect to do by going over to America? Do, said she, why raise Governors for
them. Little did she then think that of two of her boys then unborn, John would become President of
New Hampshire and James the Governor of Massachusetts.

James, in his minority, was engaged in gondolaing on our river, and it was when following this business
that he broke both of his legs, the effects of which were ever after visible in his gait.

John Sullivan, in early life, was doubtless familiar with the navigation of the Piscataqua. Later in life,
after the Revolution, when the General's commission had given place to that of President of New
Hampshire, his Excellency, being a resident of Durham, one day saw a boat bound to Portsmouth. He
asked for a passage, which was readily granted, one of the boatmen proposing the condition that the
President should observe the usual custom of paying his respects to the "Pulpit,"--a name given to
some stones projecting from the river, which the superstitious boatmen regarded as subjecting to bad
luck if passed without raising the hat. The General said he never did nor never should pay respect to
the devil's pulpit, and therefore they need not ask it of him. There was danger of bad luck to the
boatmen. They however sailed and rowed on down the river. At length one of the boatmen raised his
own hat, and casting his eyes up to the tri-colored hat with waving plume which decorated the head of

his Excellency, in apparent wonder said, "sir, the birds seem to have flown over your hat?" His hand
was speedily raised and the hat carefully brought down for inspection." I see nothing," said he. "We've
passed the Pulpit, sir," was the laconic reply. The superstitious boatmen were in good cheer; they had
brought the President down and good luck rested on the voyage of that day.

The success of the Sullivans under great difficulties should give encouragement for perseverance to all
young men. There is certainly a memento connected with Livermore street history which should never
be forgotten.

Text scanned courtesy of The Brewster Family Network
Copy of Rambles courtesy Peter E. Randall
History Hypertext project by SeacoastNH.com
Design © 1999 SeacoastNH.com
_________________________________________

Taken from ancestral file IGI on July 15, 2002 -

John SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Jun 1690
Limerick, Ireland
Marriage(s):
Spouse: Margery BROWNE
Source Information:
Film Number: 178015
Page Number: 444
Reference Number: 13703
______________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 13, 2002 -

Husband's Name
John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Pedigree
Born: 1692 Place: Limerick, , Ireland
Died: 1796 Place: Berwick, , Maine
Married: Abt 1750 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father:
Mother:

Wife's Name
Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN) Pedigree
Born: Abt 1714 Place: Cork, , Ireland
Died: 1801 Place: Berwick, , Maine
Married: Abt 1750 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father:
Mother:

Children
1. Sex Name
F Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
_________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 13, 2002 -

John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Pedigree

Sex: M Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1692
Limerick, , Ireland
Death: 1796
Berwick, , Maine
Parents:
Marriage(s):
Spouse: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN) Family
Marriage: Abt 1750
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I33997
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1795
* Occupation: Schoolmaster
* Burial: 1731 left Ireland and came to Berwick, Maine.
* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

His son John was rather famous. "Born in Limerick in 1690, Master Sullivan apparently was christened
Owen, retaining that name until after he came to America. Evidently he benefitted from a good
education, perhaps received on the continent, for he spoke French and reportedly was a linguist of
some talent. Why he came to America remains somewhat obscure, although there is reason to believe
that he argued with his mother, who opposed his marrying beneath his station.

Master Sullivan, though loath to work with his hands, soon fulfilled his obligations as a redemptioner;
tradition says he persuaded a clergyman to buy his freedom for him. He soon married Margery Brown
(Browne), who had been born in Cork in 1714. They settled in Summersworth, most likely by January,
1737, and that parish hired him as schoolmaster in 1738. There were many children in the Sullivan
family. "

"In 1747 or 1748 Master Sullivan moved his family across the river to Berwick, Maine. There in that
rustic community, the tall schoolmaster became a patriarchal figure. Somewhat of a scholar, possibly
even an idler, Master Sullivan supervised the upbringing and education of his children, two of whom,
John and James, were to go far. His wife was noted for her beauty, vanity, and violent temper. Indeed
she must have been a termagant, for earlier, in 1743, her husband sought asylum in Boston or its
environs and returned home only after his wife had apologized for her 'rash and unadvised Speech and
Behaviour'."from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore.

Father: Philip O'Sullivan b: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
Mother: Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

Marriage 1 Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

* Married: 1735

Children


1. [Has No Children] Benjamin Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
2. [Has No Children] Daniel Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
3. [Has No Children] John Sullivan b: 17 FEB 1739/40 in New Hampshire, U.S.A.
4. [Has No Children] James Sullivan b: 22 APR 1744 in Maine, U.S.A.
5. [Has Children] EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
6. [Has No Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1752
_____________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 15, 2002 -

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume X
S
Sullivan, Will Van Amberg

SULLIVAN, John, soldier, was born in Berwick, Maine, Feb. 17, 1740; son of Owen Sullivan , 1691-1796,
who immigrated to America in 1723. He became a well-known lawyer in Durham, N.H.; was active in
pre-Revolutionary matters; was major of state militia; a delegate to the Continental congress, May,
1774; was commissioned brigadier-general in the Continental army in June, 1775, and with Gen.
Nathanael Greene, commanded the left wing under Gen. Charles Lee, in the siege of Boston. Upon the
evacuation of Boston, he commanded the northern army on the Canadian borders and attacked the
British at Three Rivers, but was defeated and joined Washington at New York. He was promoted major-
general, and commanded the troops on Long Island, but relinquished his command to Gen. Benjamin
Lincoln. He took part in the battles of Long Island; Westchester; commanded the right wing under
General Washington, during the passage of the Delaware river and the subsequent capture of the
Hessians at Trenton. He commanded a night expedition on Staten Island, and took about 100 prisoners;
commanded the right wing at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown, Pa., and in 1778 was
detailed by General Washington, to co-operate with the French fleet under D'Estaing against Newport,
R.I. On Aug. 29, 1778, he fought the battle of Butt's Hill, driving the British and Hessians from the field
at the bayonet's point. He led an expedition against the Iroquois Indians and the English, in Northern
New York, burning their villages and devastating their lands. On his return to Philadelphia, he resigned
his commission and was again a delegate to the Continental congress in 1780. He resumed his law
practice in New Hampshire; was president of the state, 1786-89; a member of the state constitutional
convention in 1784; councillor in 1787, and was active in securing the adoption by the state of the U.S.
constitution. He was U.S. judge of New Hampshire, 1789-95. The honorary degree of LL.D. was
conferred on him by Harvard in 1780. The state government ordered the preparation of his Journals of
the Military Expeditions against the Six Nations in 1779, with records of Centennial Celebrations (1887).
He died in Durham, N.H., Jan. 23, 1795.
View full context
____________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 --

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I22391
* Name: EBENEZER SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 30 OCT 1750
* Birth: 1753 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
* Death: 3 JUN 1799 in Charleston, SC
* Note:
WFT Vol. 24, Ed. 1, Tree #2903

Ebenezer was a Capt and Major in the Revolutionary War and, afterwards, practiced law in S. Berwick,

ME

Ebenezer was to study medicine but his "Inclinations and Genius" led him in other directions and in
1773 his older brother John was released from having to help his brother with his accademic pursuits.

Found on Mormoms International Genealogical Index : father of Parker Sullivan born April 11, 1782.

Father: John Sullivan b: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

Marriage 1 MARY PARKER b: BET. 1735 - 1761

* Married: in Salem County, New Jersey
* Married: ABT. 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina

Children

1. [Has No Children] Nehemiah Sullivan b: in Salem County, New Jersey
2. [Has No Children] David Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Charleston, South Carolina
3. [Has No Children] William Sullivan b: ABT. 1777 in Charleston, South Carolina
4. [Has Children] PARKER SULLIVAN b: 11 APR 1782 in Salem County, New Jersey

Marriage 2 Abigail Cotton b: WFT Est. 1735-1759

* Married: WFT Est. 1764-1791

Children

1. [Has Children] John Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Berwick, ME

______________________________________________


John married Margery or Merjery Browne1735. Margery was born 1714 in Cork, Ireland. She died 1801.

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...=
Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick, Ireland, 1692; school
master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801; Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the
Major General in the Revolution), James (Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist.
Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376, Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively

multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,
original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an
ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never
heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod
McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she
was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is

added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."

_____________________________________________________

Taken from ancestrol file on July 13, 2002 -

Husband's Name
John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Pedigree
Born: 1692 Place: Limerick, , Ireland
Died: 1796 Place: Berwick, , Maine
Married: Abt 1750 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father:
Mother:



Wife's Name
Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN) Pedigree
Born: Abt 1714 Place: Cork, , Ireland
Died: 1801 Place: Berwick, , Maine
Married: Abt 1750 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father:
Mother:

Children
1. Sex Name
F Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
_________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 13, 2002 -

John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Pedigree
Sex: M Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1692
Limerick, , Ireland
Death: 1796
Berwick, , Maine
Parents:
Marriage(s):
Spouse: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN) Family
Marriage: Abt 1750
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I33997
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1795
* Occupation: Schoolmaster
* Burial: 1731 left Ireland and came to Berwick, Maine.
* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

His son John was rather famous. "Born in Limerick in 1690, Master Sullivan apparently was christened
Owen, retaining that name until after he came to America. Evidently he benefitted from a good
education, perhaps received on the continent, for he spoke French and reportedly was a linguist of
some talent. Why he came to America remains somewhat obscure, although there is reason to believe
that he argued with his mother, who opposed his marrying beneath his station.

Master Sullivan, though loath to work with his hands, soon fulfilled his obligations as a redemptioner;
tradition says he persuaded a clergyman to buy his freedom for him. He soon married Margery Brown
(Browne), who had been born in Cork in 1714. They settled in Summersworth, most likely by January,

1737, and that parish hired him as schoolmaster in 1738. There were many children in the Sullivan
family. "

"In 1747 or 1748 Master Sullivan moved his family across the river to Berwick, Maine. There in that
rustic community, the tall schoolmaster became a patriarchal figure. Somewhat of a scholar, possibly
even an idler, Master Sullivan supervised the upbringing and education of his children, two of whom,
John and James, were to go far. His wife was noted for her beauty, vanity, and violent temper. Indeed
she must have been a termagant, for earlier, in 1743, her husband sought asylum in Boston or its
environs and returned home only after his wife had apologized for her 'rash and unadvised Speech and
Behaviour'."from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore.

Father: Philip O'Sullivan b: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
Mother: Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

Marriage 1 Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

* Married: 1735

Children

1. [Has No Children] Benjamin Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
2. [Has No Children] Daniel Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
3. [Has No Children] John Sullivan b: 17 FEB 1739/40 in New Hampshire, U.S.A.
4. [Has No Children] James Sullivan b: 22 APR 1744 in Maine, U.S.A.
5. [Has Children] EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
6. [Has No Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1752
_____________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 --

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I22391
* Name: EBENEZER SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 30 OCT 1750
* Birth: 1753 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
* Death: 3 JUN 1799 in Charleston, SC
* Note:
WFT Vol. 24, Ed. 1, Tree #2903

Ebenezer was a Capt and Major in the Revolutionary War and, afterwards, practiced law in S. Berwick,
ME

Ebenezer was to study medicine but his "Inclinations and Genius" led him in other directions and in
1773 his older brother John was released from having to help his brother with his accademic pursuits.

Found on Mormoms International Genealogical Index : father of Parker Sullivan born April 11, 1782.

Father: John Sullivan b: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

Marriage 1 MARY PARKER b: BET. 1735 - 1761

* Married: in Salem County, New Jersey
* Married: ABT. 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina

Children


1. [Has No Children] Nehemiah Sullivan b: in Salem County, New Jersey
2. [Has No Children] David Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Charleston, South Carolina
3. [Has No Children] William Sullivan b: ABT. 1777 in Charleston, South Carolina
4. [Has Children] PARKER SULLIVAN b: 11 APR 1782 in Salem County, New Jersey

Marriage 2 Abigail Cotton b: WFT Est. 1735-1759

* Married: WFT Est. 1764-1791

Children

1. [Has Children] John Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Berwick, ME

______________________________________________


John and Margery had the following children:

5 M i. Benjamin Sullivanwas born Bef 1740.

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...;
SEC=Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick,
Ireland, 1692; school master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801;
Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the Major General in the Revolution), James
(Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist. Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376,
Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva...

He was re-elected governor in 1809 and died December 4th of that year. James had
four brothers, Benjamin, an officer in the British Navy who was lost at sea before the
Revolution; Daniel
who was a captain in the Revolutionary War and the founder of the town of Sullivan
in the State of Maine; John, already men- tioned, Who was a major general in the
Continental army and Gov-
ernor of New Hampshire; and Ebenezer, an officer in the Revo- lution and a lawyer in
Berwick, Maine. He had one sister, Mary, who married Theophilus Hardy.
__________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock
<alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add
Post-em
* ID: I33997
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1795
* Occupation: Schoolmaster
* Burial: 1731 left Ireland and came to Berwick, Maine.

* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

His son John was rather famous. "Born in Limerick in 1690, Master Sullivan
apparently was christened Owen, retaining that name until after he came to America.
Evidently he benefitted from a good education, perhaps received on the continent, for
he spoke French and reportedly was a linguist of some talent. Why he came to
America remains somewhat obscure, although there is reason to believe that he
argued with his mother, who opposed his marrying beneath his station.

Master Sullivan, though loath to work with his hands, soon fulfilled his obligations as
a redemptioner; tradition says he persuaded a clergyman to buy his freedom for him.
He soon married Margery Brown (Browne), who had been born in Cork in 1714. They
settled in Summersworth, most likely by January, 1737, and that parish hired him as
schoolmaster in 1738. There were many children in the Sullivan family. "

"In 1747 or 1748 Master Sullivan moved his family across the river to Berwick, Maine.
There in that rustic community, the tall schoolmaster became a patriarchal figure.
Somewhat of a scholar, possibly even an idler, Master Sullivan supervised the
upbringing and education of his children, two of whom, John and James, were to go
far. His wife was noted for her beauty, vanity, and violent temper. Indeed she must
have been a termagant, for earlier, in 1743, her husband sought asylum in Boston or
its environs and returned home only after his wife had apologized for her 'rash and
unadvised Speech and Behaviour'."from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of
New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore.

Father: Philip O'Sullivan b: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
Mother: Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

Marriage 1 Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

* Married: 1735

Children

1. [Has No Children] Benjamin Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
2. [Has No Children] Daniel Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
3. [Has No Children] John Sullivan b: 17 FEB 1739/40 in New Hampshire, U.S.A.
4. [Has No Children] James Sullivan b: 22 APR 1744 in Maine, U.S.A.
5. [Has Children] EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
6. [Has No Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1752
_____________________________________________________


+ 6 M ii. Captain Daniel Sullivanwas born Bef 1740. He died 1781.

+ 7 M iii. General John Sullivanwas born 7 Feb 1740. He died 23 Jan 1795.

+ 8 M iv. James Sullivanwas born 22 Apr 1744. He died 10 Dec 1808.

+ 9 F v. Mary Sullivanwas born 1752. She died 1827.

+ 10 M vi. Captain Moses Ebenezer Sullivanwas born 3 Oct 1753. He died 3 Jun 1799.




Fifth Generation

6. Captain Daniel Sullivan(John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born Bef 1740. He died 1781 in Sorrento, Maine .

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...=
Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick, Ireland, 1692; school
master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801; Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the
Major General in the Revolution), James (Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist.
Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376, Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://www.jonsullivan.com/osullivan/jcsullivan/chap12.htm

Daniel, Captain, Maine, Died 1781. Captain Sullivan, brother of Major General John Sullivan, is buried at
Sorrento, Me.
_______________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva...

He was re-elected governor in 1809 and died December 4th of that year. James had four brothers,
Benjamin, an officer in the British Navy who was lost at sea before the Revolution; Daniel
who was a captain in the Revolutionary War and the founder of the town of Sullivan in the State of
Maine; John, already men- tioned, Who was a major general in the Continental army and Gov-
ernor of New Hampshire; and Ebenezer, an officer in the Revo- lution and a lawyer in Berwick, Maine.
He had one sister, Mary, who married Theophilus Hardy.
__________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project

1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I33997
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1795
* Occupation: Schoolmaster
* Burial: 1731 left Ireland and came to Berwick, Maine.
* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

His son John was rather famous. "Born in Limerick in 1690, Master Sullivan apparently was christened
Owen, retaining that name until after he came to America. Evidently he benefitted from a good
education, perhaps received on the continent, for he spoke French and reportedly was a linguist of
some talent. Why he came to America remains somewhat obscure, although there is reason to believe
that he argued with his mother, who opposed his marrying beneath his station.

Master Sullivan, though loath to work with his hands, soon fulfilled his obligations as a redemptioner;
tradition says he persuaded a clergyman to buy his freedom for him. He soon married Margery Brown
(Browne), who had been born in Cork in 1714. They settled in Summersworth, most likely by January,
1737, and that parish hired him as schoolmaster in 1738. There were many children in the Sullivan
family. "

"In 1747 or 1748 Master Sullivan moved his family across the river to Berwick, Maine. There in that
rustic community, the tall schoolmaster became a patriarchal figure. Somewhat of a scholar, possibly
even an idler, Master Sullivan supervised the upbringing and education of his children, two of whom,
John and James, were to go far. His wife was noted for her beauty, vanity, and violent temper. Indeed
she must have been a termagant, for earlier, in 1743, her husband sought asylum in Boston or its
environs and returned home only after his wife had apologized for her 'rash and unadvised Speech and
Behaviour'."from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore.

Father: Philip O'Sullivan b: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
Mother: Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

Marriage 1 Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

* Married: 1735

Children

1. [Has No Children] Benjamin Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
2. [Has No Children] Daniel Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
3. [Has No Children] John Sullivan b: 17 FEB 1739/40 in New Hampshire, U.S.A.
4. [Has No Children] James Sullivan b: 22 APR 1744 in Maine, U.S.A.
5. [Has Children] EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
6. [Has No Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1752

_____________________________________________________


Daniel married Abigail Bean.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_______________________________________


Daniel and Abigail had the following children:

11 F i. Rachel Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN

4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_______________________________________


12 M ii. James Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_______________________________________


13 F iii. Hannah Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M

* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_______________________________________


14 F iv. Mary Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_______________________________________


15 F v. Lydia Sullivan.


Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_______________________________________


16 M vi. John Sullivan.

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My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
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* ID: I4923
* Name: Daniel SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: BEF ___ 1740 1

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Abigail BEAN

Children
1. [Has No Children] Rachel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] Hannah SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN


Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
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7. General John Sullivan(John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born 7 Feb 1740 in Somersworth, Strafford, New Hampshire or Berwick, Maine. He died 23 Jan 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire. He was buried in Sullivan family cemetery.

General John Sullivan Timeline -

7 Feb 1740 - General John Sullivan born to Margery Browne and John Owen Sullivan

22 June 1775 - John Sullivan (age 35) becomes Brigadier-General Continental Army

1775 - Brigadier General Sullivan commanded left wing of army

9th August, 1776 - John Sullivan (age 36) becomes Major-General

1776 - Peter Bryant Bruin Major and Aide-de-Camp, John Skey Eustace (Ga) Aide-de-Camp, to General
Sullivan (age 36)

4 June 1776 - Colonel Thompson was promoted a brigadier general March 1, 1776, and on the 19th of
March he relieved General Charles Lee of the command of the forces at New [p.191] York. In April
following he was ordered to Canada, to reenforce General John Thomas. He met the remnant of the
Northern army on its retreat from Quebec, and assumed the chief command, yielding the same on the
4th of June to General John Sullivan , by whose orders he made a disastrous attack on the enemy at
Three Rivers, and was there made a prisoner.

14 August 1776 - Alexandria Scammell (NH.) Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age 36)

14 August 1776, to 12th June, 1779 - Lewis Morris Jr. (N. Y.) Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age
36)

15 August 1776 - William Stephens Smith (N. Y.) Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan

9th October, 1776 - Edward Sherburne (N. H.) Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan

27 August 1776 - General Sullivan (age 36) taken prisoner at Long Island

August 29 (Quaker Hill) - General Sullivan and troops repulsed the Bristish forces

December 1776 - General Sullivan (age 36) exchanged

27 September 1777 - John White (Pa) volunteer Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan

9 November 1777 - Nicholas Van Cortlandt (N. Y.) Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan (age
37)

1777 - Patrick Cogan, an officer of the First New Hampshire Regiment in the Revolution, who served
under General John Sullivan (age 37) at Ticonderoga

1778 - General Titcomb's brigade in the unsuccessful campaign of General Sullivan (age 38) against the
British at Newport, Rhode Island

1778 ? - Rufus King served in the Revolutionary War; became aide to General Sullivan in his expedition
to Rhode Island

9 September 1778 - Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan (age 38),

9 September 1778 - Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan (age 38),
and to the officers and troops of his command, for their fortitude and bravery displayed in the action of
August 29th (Quaker Hill), in which they repulsed the British forces and maintained the field."

1779 - Jonathon Dayton accompanied General Sullivan (age 39) on his western expedition

1779 - Joseph Brant, (Thayendanega) accompanied the expedition from Fort Niagara against General
Sullivan (age 39)

14 October 1779 - "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan (age 39)
and the brave officers and soldiers under his command, for effectually executing an important
expedition against such of the Indian nations as, encouraged by the councils of his Britannic majesty,
had perfidiously waged an unprovoked and cruel war against these United States, laid waste many of
their defenseless towns, and with savage barbarity slaughtered the inhabitants thereof."

30 November 1779 - General John Sullivan (age 39) resigned

23 January 1795 - General John Sullivan (ager 54) died

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Cambridge, Massachusetts History, Supplement [Print]
Viewing records 1-1 of 1 Matches

HISTORY of CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 1630-1877
PREFACE
page 723
Sullivan, Brigadier general, commanded left wing of army, 1775, 422
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The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume I
A
Brantley, William Gordon
page 392
BRANT, Joseph, (Thayendanega), Indian wass born on the banks of the Ohio in 1742; son of Mohawk,
chief of the Wolf tribe, and grandson of one of the five sachems or Indian kings who visited London in
the reign of Queen Anne (1710). Sir Richard Steele mentions them in the Tatler of May 13, 1710, and
Addison give them place in a number of the Spectator. His [p.392] Indian name is interpreted Two-
sticks-of-wood bound-together, denoting "the strong." He fought in the battle of Lake George, 1755;
served under Sir William Johnson in the Niagara campaign 1759, and attended the Moor charity school
at Lebanon, Conn. He participated in the Pontiac war in 1763; married the daughter of an Oneida chief
and settled at Canajoharie, where he engaged in translating portions of the Bible into Mohawk and
acted as secretary to Guy Johnson, superintendent of Indian affairs. He served at the head of two
hundred and twenty braves against the French in Canada, and accompanied Colonel Johnson to
England in November 1775, where he set the grievances of the Six Nations before Lord George
Germain in March, 1776. He joined the expedition of General St. Leger against Fort Stanwix in 1777;
almost destroyed the party under General Herkimer at the battle of Oriskany, Aug. 6, 1777;
accompanied the expedition from Fort Niagara against General Sullivan in 1779, and in 1780, captured
General Harper and his command. After peace was declared in 1783 the Mohawks went to Canada to
arrange for a settlement, and in 1785 he went to England, where he obtained reimbursements for his
tribe for losses sustained in helping the British cause, and also contributions towards an Episcopal
church. He returned in 1786; defeated General St. Clair in Western Ohio, thus putting an end to the
war between the Indians and the United States. He was presented to Washington in 1792. He
translated the gospel of St. Mark into the Mohawk language and assisted Col. Daniel Claus in

translating the "Book of Common Prayer." His statue was unveiled at Brantford, Ontario, Oct. 13, 1886.
He died Nov. 24, 1807.
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Biographical Directory of the American Congress [Print]
Viewing records 1-2 of 2 Matches


Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
Biographies
K
page 1414
KING, Rufus (half brother of Cyrus King and father of John Alsop King and James Gore King), a
Delegate from Massachusetts and a Senator from New York; born in Scarboro, Maine (then a district of
Massachusetts), March 24, 1755; attended Dummer Academy, Byfield, near Newburyport, Mass., and
was graduated from Harvard College in 1777; served in the Revolutionary War; became aide to General
Sullivan in his expedition to Rhode Island; studied law in Newburyport; was admitted to the bar and
commenced practice in 1780; member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1782;
Member of the Continental Congress from Massachusetts 1784-1787; delegate to the Federal
constitutional convention at Philadelphia in 1787 and to the State convention in 1788 which ratified the
same; moved to New York City in 1788; member of the New York Assembly in 1789 and 1790; elected
as a Federalist from New York to the United States Senate in 1789; reelected in 1795 and served from
July 16, 1789, until May 23, 1796, when he resigned; United States Minister to Great Britain from May
20, 1796, to May 18, 1803; unsuccessful Federalist candidate for Vice President of the United States in
1804; again elected to the United States Senate in 1813; reelected in 1819 and served from March 4,
1813, to March 3, 1825; unsuccessful Federalist candidate for Governor of New York in 1815 and for
President of the United States in 1816; again United States Minister to Great Britain from May 5, 1825,
to June 16, 1826; died in Jamaica, Long Island, N.Y., April 29, 1827; interment in the churchyard of
Grace Church.
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SOME PENNSYLVANIA WOMEN DURING THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION.
MATRONS OF THE REVOLUTION.
CATHARINE ROSS THOMPSON.
page 191
Colonel Thompson was promoted a brigadier general March 1, 1776, and on the 19th of March he
relieved General Charles Lee of the command of the forces at New [p.191] York. In April following he
was ordered to Canada, to reenforce General John Thomas. He met the remnant of the Northern army
on its retreat from Quebec, and assumed the chief command, yielding the same on the 4th of June to
General John Sullivan , by whose orders he made a disastrous attack on the enemy at Three Rivers,
and was there made a prisoner. His captivity was long and embittered. He returned to Pennsylvania on
parole, but was not exchanged for two years. During that period his sensibility, generous and keen,
was chiefly wounded by the reflection that he was precluded from signalizing himself in the defense of
his country. In his brief military experience he was greatly distinguished for his intrepidity, generosity,
hospitality and manly candor, which rendered his character the object of uniform admiration and
esteem. It was not until October, 1780, that he was liberated by exchange. During the last year of his
life he was severely afflicted with rheumatism. He died on his farm near Carlisle, September 3, 1781,
and was buried in the cemetery of St. John's Episcopal church, in that town. The Pennsylvania Padder
in a notice of his decease, says: "His death is a subject of universal concern and lamentation. His

funeral was the most respectable that has ever been known in Carlisle. In the great number that
assembled on the melancholy occasion scarcely was there one person to be found who did not drop a
tear to the memory of the soldier, the patriot, and the friend." General and Mrs. Thompson left a large
family of children.
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Pioneer Irish in New England
CHAPTER VII
page 114
is met with in Ireland as early as 1172, in the person of Milo de Cogan, one of Strongbows stalwarts in
the Norman invasion, and the Huguenot family of Cogin that is mentioned in Irish annals probably
sprang from this Norman soldier. OHart lists two Cogan families, one in Cork and the other in Louth,
among Families in Ireland down to the fifteenth century;Irish Pedigrees, by John OHart, Vol. 2.51 one
branch he enumerates among the principal families in County Cork and another branch as one of the
principal families in Dublin,Ibid., Vol. 1, pp. 810 and 834.52 and there were MacCogans in Queens and
Tipperary Counties. The name originally was OCuagain, anglicised into its present forms, and the motto
on the Cogan coat of arms is Lambh Dearg Eirin, the red hand of Erin. There are numerous persons in
whose minds the thought is inconceivable that an Irishman could occupy so prominent a place in the
business and social life of Boston as did John Cogan, and with that idea uppermost in their minds, they
conclude that he must have been an Englishman; yet there is nothing to justify that conclusion and no
historian makes the claim. The natural inference is that John Cogan was an Irishman.Patrick Cogan, an
officer of the First New Hampshire Regiment in the
Revolution, who served under General John Sullivan at Ticonderoga in 1777, was a native of Ireland.53
He died in 1657, and in the will of John Coggan, dated December 16th of that year, he mentioned his
wife, Martha Coggan, and brother, Humphrey Coggan of Boston.
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
W
Fifteenth Virginia
page 586
White, John (Pa). Volunteer Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan, 27th September, 1777; died 10th
October, 1777, of wounds received at Germantown, 4th October, 1777.
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
V
Fifteenth Virginia
page 555

Van Cortlandt, Nicholas (N. Y.). Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan, 9th November, 1777, to
?.
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
S
Fifteenth Virginia
page 527
Sullivan, John (N. H.). Brigadier-General Continental Army, 22d June, 1775; Major-General , 9th August,
1776; taken prisoner at Long Island, 27th August, 1776; exchanged December, 1776. By the Act of
9th September, 1778, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan ,
and to the officers and troops of his command, for their fortitude and bravery displayed in the action
of August 29th (Quaker Hill), in which they repulsed the British forces and maintained the field." By the
act of 14th October, 1779, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General
Sullivan and the brave officers and soldiers under his command, for effectually executing an important
expedition against such of the Indian nations as, encouraged by the councils of his Britannic majesty,
had perfidiously waged an unprovoked and cruel war against these United States, laid waste many of
their defenseless towns, and with savage barbarity slaughtered the inhabitants thereof." Resigned 30th
November, 1779. (Died 23d January, 1795.)
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
S
Fifteenth Virginia
page 508
Smith, William Stephens (N. Y.). Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan , 15th August, 1776;
Lieutenant-Colonel of Lee's Additional Continental Regiment, 1st January, 1777; transferred to
Spencer's Regiment, 22d April, 1779; continued as Adjutant and Inspector on staff of General Lafayette,
1st January to July, 1781; Lieutenant-Colonel Aide-de-Camp to General Washington, 6th July, 1781, to
23d December, 1783. (Died 10th June, 1816.)
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
S
Fifteenth Virginia

page 494
Sherburne, Edward (N. H.). Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan, 9th October, 1776; killed at
Germantown, 4th October, 1777.
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
S
Fifteenth Virginia
page 484
Scammell, Alexandria (NH.). Major New Hampshire Militia, April, 1775; Brigade-Major to New
Hampshire Brigade, 21st September, 1775; Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan 14th August, 1776;
Brigade Major to General Lee's Division, 29th October, 1776; Colonel 3d New Hampshire, 8th [p.484]
November, 1776; Adjutant-General Continental Army, on staff of General Washington, 5th January,
1778, to 1st January, 1781, when he resigned to assume command of the 1st New Hampshire; mortally
wounded and taken prisoner at Yorktown, 30th September, 1781, and died while a prisoner, 6th
October, 1781.
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
M
Fifteenth Virginia
page 403
Morris, Lewis, Jr. (N. Y.). Brigade-Major New York Militia, 7th June, 1776; Major Aide-de-Camp to
General Sullivan , 14th August, 1776, to 12th June, 1779; brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel Continental
Army by the act of 9th September, 1778, "for bringing forward to Congress the account of the repulse
of the British forces on Rhode Island on the 29th of August last, and who, on the late expedition, as
well as on several other occasions, behaved with great spirit and good conduct." Aide-de-Camp to
General Greene, 12th June, 1779, to close of war.
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
E
Fifteenth Virginia
page 218
Eustace, John Skey (Ga). Major Aide-de-Camp to General Lee, 29th October, 1776; Aide-de-Camp to

General Sullivan, 7th November, 1777; Aide-de-Camp to General Greene in 1779; resigned 27th
January, 1780. (Died 25th August, 1805.)
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American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
B
Fifteenth Virginia
page 128
Bruin, Peter Bryant (Va). Lieutenant of Morgan's Virginia Rifle Company, July, 1775; wounded and
taken prisoner at Quebec, 31st December, 1775; exchanged ? July, 1776; Captain 11th Virginia, 19th
December, 1776; Major and Aide-de-Camp to General Sullivan , 9th November, 1777; regiment
designated 7th Virginia, 14th September, 1778; Meier, ?; served to close of war. (Died 27th January,
1827.)
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American Biographical Library
The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans
Volume 3
D
Dayton, William Lewis
page 181
Dayton, Jonathan, senator, was born in Elizabeth Town, N.J., Oct. 16, 1760; son of Gen. Elias Dayton,
Revolutionary soldier. He was graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1776, and in 1778 joined the
army as a paymaster. In 1779 he accompanied General Sullivan on his western expedition and in 1780
was a captain in his father's regiment, the 3d New Jersey regulars. He was present at many of the
battles in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Virginia, and was promoted to important commands including
one under Lafayette at the battle of Yorktown. After the war he was a member of the state council for
some years and speaker in 1790. He was a delegate from New Jersey to the Federal constitutional
convention of 1787, his father having declined the appointment in his favor. He represented his state in
the 2d, 3d, 4th and 5th congresses, 1791-99, and was speaker of the house during the 4th and 5th
congresses, 1795-99. In April, 1799, he was elected to the United States senate and served a full term.
President Adams commissioned him brigadier-general with the privilege of retaining his seat in the
senate. He was arrested in 1807 on the charge of conspiring with Aaron Burr in treasonable projects.
He gave bail, which was subsequently released, and he was never brought to trial. This incident and
the disruption of the Federal party caused him to withdraw from public life. He was afterward elected
repeatedly to the council of the New Jersey legislature and held office in his native town. He was
interested with Symmes and others in the settlement of western military lands, and the town of Dayton,
Ohio, was named for him. The College of New Jersey conferred upon him the degree of LL.D. in 1798.
He died in Elizabethtown, N.J., Oct. 9, 1824.
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American Biographical Library
The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans

Volume 3
D
Dayton, Jonathan
page 181
Dayton, Elias, soldier, was born in Elizabeth Town, N.J., in July, 1737; son of Jonathan Dayton, who
settled in Elizabeth Town about 1720 and died Oct. 5, 1776. Elias entered the military service of the
province as a lieutenant, March 19, 1759, and fought in the British army against the French, in the "
Jersey Blues." He was promoted captain, March 29, 1760; served under Wolfe at Quebec; and in 1764,
led a company of state militia against the Indians at Detroit. He was a member of the committee of
safety and on Jan. 23, 1776, commanded the Elizabeth Town volunteers in the capture of the Blue
Mountain Valley, a British transport off Elizabeth Town. He was appointed colonel of the 3d battalion,
New Jersey regiment, Feb. 9, 1776, with which he served in the defence of Ticonderoga. In 1779 he
accompanied General Sullivan on his western expedition. On July 20, 1780, he was placed in command
of the New Jersey brigade. In 1781 he aided in suppressing the mutiny of the New Jersey line. He
participated in the battles of Springfield, Monmouth, Brandywine, Germantown and Yorktown, and had
three horses shot under him while leading his troops, one at Springfield, one at Germantown and one
at Crosswick's Bridge. He was made a brigadier-general, Jan. 8, 1783, and major-general of state
militia, June 15, 1793. He served as a member of the state legislature and was a delegate to the
Continental congress, 1787-88. He was mayor of the borough from 1796 to 1805, with the exception of
a single year. He was elected president of the New Jersey society of the Cincinnati upon its
organization and retained the office during his lifetime. His daughter Hannah was married in April, 1776,
to Gen. Matthias Ogden, who died, March 31, 1791, and his son, Elias Bayley, was married, Jan. 19,
1786, to Elizabeth Catharine, daughter of the Rev. Dr. Thomas Bradbury Chandler. General Dayton died
in Elizabethtown, N.J., Oct. 22, 1807.
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American Biographical Library
The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans
Volume 3
C
Cutler, Nathan
page 91
Cutler, Manasseh, representative, was born in Killingly, Conn, May 13, 1742: son of Hezekiah and
Susanna (Clark) Cutler; grandson of John and Hannah (Snow) Cutler; great-grandson of James and
Lydia (Moore) Wright Cutler; and great great grandson of James and Anna Cutler of Watertown, Mass.
James Cutler came to America from Norfolkshire, England, in 1634. Manasseh was prepared for college
by the Rev. Aaron Brown and was graduated at Yale in 1765. He taugbt school for a year at Dedham,
Mass, and married, Sept. 7, 1766, Mary, daughter of the Rev. Thomas Balch, and settled at Edgartown,
Mass., as a merchant. He was admitted to the bar in 1767 and the same year began the study of
theology under his father-in-law. He was installed pastor of the Congregational church at Hamlet,
Ipswich, Mass., Sept. 11, 1771. He was commissioned "by order of the major part of the Massachusetts
council, "chaplain of Col. Ebenezer Francis's regiment, Sept. 5, 1776, and he served until Jan. 1, 1777.
In 1778 he was chaplain of General Titcomb's brigade in the unsuccessful campaign of General Sullivan
against the British at Newport, R.I., and for his gallantry was presented with a horse by General
Titcomb. He studied medicine to meet the needs of tbe neighborhood, and in 1779 had forty smallpox
patients under his care at Wenham, Mass. In 1784, with a party, be ascended Mr. Washington and
carried instruments by which he estimated its height to be 10,000 feet above sea level, an excess of
3707 feet. His party claimed to be the first to reach the summit. When twenty-seven years old he
began the study of astronomy and his journal records observations at this time on the transit of Venus.
He opened a neighborhood reading school in 1782 which he conducted successfully for twenty-five
years, and at the some time instructed seamen in navigation and lunar observations. He also studied

the flora of New England and was a correspondent of various botanists and astronomical observers in
America and Europe. In 1787 he was one of the projectors of the Ohio company, organized to promote
the settlement of government lands on the Ohio river, and to arrange that the bounty lands granted to
officers who had served in the Revolution, should be located together. The company purchased 1,000,
000 acres of land, Oct. 27, 1787, and congress added to it 500,000 acres for bad lands and incidental
expenses, the arrangement being made through Dr. Cutler and Winthrop Sargent as agents of the
company, who applied personally to congress, then assembled in New York city, and entered into a
contract with the government for the purchase of the land. The first settlement was made on the site
of Marietta by a party of fifty immigrants who left Dr. Cutler's house at Ipswich, Dec. 3, 1787, and
among whom was Jervis, one of Dr. Cutler's sons, then nineteen years old. They journeyed through the
wilderness 750 miles behind a large wagon drawn by oxen and marked on the canvas cover "For the
Ohio at the Muskingum." They reached their destination April 7, 1788, and under the direction of Gen.
Rufus Putnam rounded the first white settlement within the limits of Ohio. Dr. Cutler subsequently
made the journey himself in a sulky in twenty-nine days, and remained with tbe settlers for some
weeks, during which time he inspected the fortifications and mounds in the neighborhood and
advanced the theory that a race more intelligent than the Indians bad erected them. He drafted the
original resolution afterward framed by Nathan Dane, delegate from Massachusetts to tbe Continental
congress, aud passed by that body, July 13, 1787, for the government of the territory northwest of the
Ohio in which he recited "there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory."
In 1795 he declined the appointment of judge of the supreme court of the Ohio territory. He was
elected to the state legislature of Massachusetts in May, 1800, and was a representative from
Massachusetts in the 7th and 8th congresses, 1801-05. He drew up the charter of a school at Marietta,
Ohio, which subsequently became Marietta college. He was elected a member of the American
academy of arts and sciences in 1781, and contributed valuable scientific papers to its Proceedings. He
was also a member of the American philosophical society. He received from Yale the degree of A.M. in
1769, and that of LL. D. in 1791, and from Harvard that of A.M. in 1770. He died at Hamilton, Mass.,
July 28, 1823. zzz
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Brown Cheser
Entries: 894 Updated: Thu Jun 7 19:28:57 2001 Contact: Mindi Neuenwchwander <mneuen@abc-
networks.com>
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I890
* Name: General John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 Feb 1740 in Somersworth, New Hampshire
* Death: ? Jan 1795
* Note: 1740 Revolutionary War General
Father: John Sullivan b: ? ??? ???? in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Merjery Browne b: ? ??? ???? in Cork, Ireland

Marriage 1 Lydia Worchester b: ? ??? ????
* Married: 1760
Children
1. [Has Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1775
____________________________________

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Brown Cheser
Entries: 894 Updated: Thu Jun 7 19:28:57 2001 Contact: Mindi Neuenwchwander <mneuen@abc-

networks.com>
Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I892
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: ? ??? ???? in Limerick, Ireland
* Note: Irish Redemption

Marriage 1 Merjery Browne b: ? ??? ???? in Cork, Ireland
* Married: 1720
Children
1. [Has Children] General John Sullivan b: 17 Feb 1740 in Somersworth, New Hampshire
_________________________________________

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My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3303
* Name: John SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 FEB 1739 in New Hampshire 1
* Death: 23 JAN 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire 1
* Note: Governor of New Hampshire in 1786.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Lydia Remick WORSTER
* Married: 1760

Children
1. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_________________________________________________

http://www.ireland-usa.com/history/level3/johnsullivan.html -
General John Sullivan 1740 - 1795

Born in Somersworth, New Hampshire, on February 17, 1740, John Sullivan was the third son of Irish
immigrants. His father was the local schoolmaster and he made sure his son received a good education.

Sullivan read the law and in 1764 he bought three acres on the bank of the Oyster River in Durham and
hung out his shingle there. But on December 15 of that year, he committed himself totally to the
Revolution when he led a raid on Fort William and Mary in New Castle to secure arms for the rebel
cause.

He attended the Continental Congress and later served in the siege of Boston. After a nine-month siege

the American Army drove the British out of Boston; in the spring of '76 Washington sent Sullivan to
Canada.

There he took command of the sick, dispirited, and mutinous remnants of the army that had invaded
Canada the previous year. Stubborn and with high hopes of military victories, Sullivan wrote
Washington that he was "Determin'd to hold," but he was soon forced to retreat.

Sullivan's enemies in Congress criticized him severely for the retreat, but on 9th August the delegates
voted to promote him to the rank of major general. At about this time, Washington described Sullivan
as "active, spirited, and Zealously attach'd to the cause" and went on to say that he had "a little
tincture of vanity . . . an over desire of being popular, which now and then leads him into some
embarrassments."

He was captured during the Battle of Long Island (1776), but was exchanged in time to fight at
Trenton and Princeton.

Sullivan also served (1777-78) under Washington in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and in 1779 he
fought his most effective campaign, against the Iroquois and Loyalists along the New York frontier.

In his later years, he served as chief executive of New Hampshire (1786 - 87, 1789) and as a federal
district judge (1789 - 95).
______________________________________________

http://state.nh.us/nhsl/nhbooks/general.html
A General Of The Revolution: John Sullivan Of New Hampshire

Whittemore, Charles
(Columbia, 1961)

A balanced & scholarly treatment of a too long neglected figure. Usually embroiled in controversy,
Sullivan was one of Washington's most active lieutenants & later governor of N.H.
_______________________________________

http://famousamericans.net/johnsullivan/

John Sullivan

SULLIVAN, John, soldier, born in Berwick, Maine, 17 February, 1740; died in Durham, New Hampshire,
23 January, 1795. Dermod, chief of Beare and Bantry, Ireland, who was killed in his castle of Dunboy in
1549, was his well-known lineal ancestor. His father, Owen, who died in 1796 at the age of 105, was
born in Limerick during the siege in 1691, and came to this country in 1723. The son studied law,
practised with success in Durham, New Hampshire, and from 1772 held the commission of major in the
militia. He was sent from New Hampshire in May, 1774, to the Continental congress at Philadelphia at
the age of thirty-three, and was appointed in June, 1775, one of the eight brigadier-generals of the
Continental army, then engaged in the siege of Boston, General Nathanael Greene and himself being
placed in command of the left wing under General Charles Lee. Before this, in December, 1774, he had
led, with John Langdon, a successful expedition against Fort William and Mary, near Portsmouth. He
took a principal part in the siege of Boston, but for a brief period was detached for the defence of
Portsmouth. By his influence, when the time was up for the stipulated service of the troops from
Connecticut, the army was re-enforced by 2,000 men from his own state of New Hampshire. After the
evacuation of the city, Sullivan took command, on 2 June, 1776, of the northern army on the borders
of Canada. He made an unsuccessful attack on the British at Three Rivers, but his troops were
prostrated by smallpox and menaced by greatly superior numbers, and he led them in a skilful retreat
to join Washington at New York. After holding for a brief period the chief command on Long Island,
and being appointed major-general, he yielded command on the island to General Benjamin Lincoln, his
senior in years and date of commission. With Lord Stirling and about 8,000 men on Long Island they
held at bay for a time 23,000 British troops, better equipped and disciplined. Sullivan and Stifling were
captured, but soon exchanged. The former did good service in the operations of Westchester, receiving

the thanks of Washington in general orders at the close of the campaign. When General Charles Lee,
lodging apart from his troops, was taken prisoner, Sullivan led the right wing to join Washington on the
Delaware, and commanded the right wing in the passage of the river on Christmas night, and the
capture of the Hessians at Trenton. He also took part in the battle of Princeton. While waiting for the
British to attack Philadelphia, Sullivan made a night descent on Staten island to capture several
regiments that were posted there, and took 100 prisoners. He received the approbation of congress.
He then marched rapidly to join Washington, and, in command of the right wing, fought at the
Brandywine and at Germantown, where he defeated the British left. When, early in 1778, the alliance
was made with France, Sullivan was sent by Washington to take command in Rhode Island, and when
D'Estaing arrived with his fleet he did his part to raise 10,000 men in a few weeks to co-operate with it
against Newport, which was then garrisoned by 7,000 British and Hessians. The volunteers were
disconcerted by the withdrawal of the French fleet, which sailed away to fight the English, and being
instructed by Washington that 5,000 more troops were on their way to re-enforce the garrison, Sullivan
marched the army, now reduced to 6,000 men, to Butt's hill, and from 7 A. M. to 7 P.M. on 29 August
fought what Lafayette pronounced the best-contested battle of the war, 6,000 on each side, virtually
ending about 4 P.M. in driving the enemy from the battle-field at the point of the bayonet. While
waiting in the summer of 1779 for the promised return of D'Estaing from the West Indies to co-operate
against Canada, Sullivan, in command of 4,000 men, to prepare the way, entered the Iroquois' country
in the state of New York to punish and prevent the devastations of the Indian tribes and their English
allies, and defeating all that ventured to oppose him, including a force under Joseph Brant and Sir John
Johnson at New-town on 29 August, 1779, drove out of the country thousands of Indian warriors and
destroyed their villages and crops. After moving several hundred miles through the wilderness, he
returned to Pennsylvania to learn that D'Estaing had fruitlessly spent his strength in the siege of
Savannah and sailed for France. His health being shattered by five years' active and continuous service
in the field, he resigned, and was again sent in 1780 to the Continental congress, where he helped to
reorganize the army and to establish the finances and public credit. He was chairman of the committee
that aided in suppressing the mutiny of Pennsylvania troops in 1781. Resuming his practice in New
Hampshire, he was president of the state in 1786-'9, a member of the State constitutional convention
of 1784, councillor in 1781, and a commissioner to settle the "New Hampshire grant" troubles with
Vermont. In 1786, by intrepidity and good management, he saved his state from anarchy, and in 1788
he was active in securing the adoption of the constitution of the United States. From 1789 till his death
he was United States judge for his state. Harvard gave him the degree of LB. D. in 1780. See his life by
Oliver W. B. Peabody, in Sparks's "American Biography" ; his "Military Services and Public Life," by
Thomas C. Amory (Boston, 1868); and "Journals of the Military Expedition of Major-General John
Sullivan against the Six Nations of Indians in 1779, with Records of Centennial Celebrations," prepared
by order of the state government (Auburn, New York, 1887).--His son, George, statesman, born in
Durham, New Hampshire, 29 August, 1771 ; died in Exeter, New Hampshire, 14 June, 1838, was
graduated at Harvard in 1790, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and began to practise at Exeter in
1793. He was a member of the state house of representatives in 1805, attorney-general of New
Hampshire in 1805-'6, a member of congress in 1811-'13, and of the state senate in 1814-'15, and was
again attorney-general in 1816-'35. He published orations and pamphlets.--General John's brother,
James, statesman, born in Berwick, Maine, 22 April, 1744; died in Boston, Massachusetts, 10 December,
1808, was intended for a military life, which he was prevented from following by the fracture of a limb.
He studied law under his brother, was admitted to the bar, began practice at Biddeford, and in 1770
received the appointment of king's attorney for York county. He early took an active part in the
Revolution, was a member of the Provincial conchusetts in 1775, and with two others ably executed a
difficult mission to Ticonderoga. In the early part of 1776 he was appointed a judge of the superior
court, which post he resigned in February, 1782. In 1779-'80 he was a member of the State
constitutional convention, and in 1784-'5 he was a delegate from Massachusetts to the Continental
congress. He repeatedly represented Boston in the state assembly, and in 1784 was a commissioner to
settle the controversy between New York and Massachusetts regarding their claims to western lands. In
1787 he was of the executive council and judge of probate of Suffolk county, and he served as attorney-
general from 1790 till 1807, when he was elected governor of Massachusetts by the Republican party,

and re-elected in 1808. He was one of the commissioners appointed by Washington to settle the
boundary-line between this country and the British North American provinces, and the projector of the
Middlesex canal, which was constructed under the superintendence of his son, John Langdon. He was a
member of the American academy of arts and sciences from its institution, and one of the principal
founders of the Massachusetts historical society, and for many years its president. Harvard gave him
the degree of LL.D. in 1780. He published "Observations on the Government of the United States"
(Boston, 1791); "The Path to Riches, or Dissertation on Banks " (1792) ; "History of the District of
Maine " (1795); "The Altar of Baal thrown Down, or the French Nation Defended" (1795) ; "Impartial
Review of the Causes of the French Revolution" (1798) ; "History of Land-Titles in Massachusetts"
(1801) ; "Dissertation on the Constitutional Liberty of the Press" (1801) ; "Correspondence with Colonel
Pickering" (1808); and a "History of the Penobscot Indians," in "Massachusetts Historical Collections."
His life, with selections from his writings, was published by his grandson, Thomas C. Amory (2 vols.,
Boston, 1859).--James's son, William, author, born in Saeo, Maine, 30 November, 1774" died in Boston,
Massachusetts, 3 September, 1839, was graduated at Harvard in 1792, admitted to the bar in 1795,
and practised successfully for many years in Boston, where he was long president of the Suffolk bar
association. He was frequently a member of the state legislature and council of Massachusetts between
1804 and 1830, and was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1830. He was a brigadier-
general of militia, and a member of the Academy of arts and sciences, the Massachusetts historical
society, and the American philosophical society. Mr. Sullivan was a fine belles-lettres scholar, and a
persuasive orator. Harvard gave him the degree of LL.D. in 1826. He published "Political Class-Book"
(Boston, 1831); "Moral Class-Book" (1833), "Historical Class-Book" (1833); "Familiar Letters on the
Public Men of the Revolution, including Events, 1783-1815" (1834; new ed., with a biographical sketch
of the author, by his son, John T. S. Sullivan, Philadelphia, 1847); "Sea Life" (Boston, 1837) ; "
Historical Causes and Effects, A. D. 476-1517" (1838) ; and many addresses.--William's son, John
Turner Sargent, lawyer, born in Boston, in 1813; died there, 30 December, 1838, was educated in
Germany, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and St.
Louis, Missouri His social and convivial qualities made him very popular. He wrote several well-known
songs, and, besides the memoir of his father, published translations of stories from the German.--
Another son of Governor James, John Langdon, engineer, born in Saco, Maine, 9 April, 1777; died in
Boston, Massachusetts, 9 February, 1865, after engaging in mercantile business travelled in Europe,
studied the construction of canals in France and England, and in 1804 was appointed agent and
engineer of the Middlesex canal, between Boston and Concord, New Hampshire He invented a steam
tow-boat, for which he received a patent in 1814, in preference to Robert Fulton, who applied for it at
the same time, Sullivan's priority of invention being fully shown. In 1824 he was appointed by President
Monroe associate civil engineer of the board of internal improvements, which post he resigned in 1825,
after reporting the practicability of a canal across the Alleghanies. He then studied medicine, received
his degree at Yale in 1837, and engaged in practice at New Haven, adopting the views of the
homceopathists. In 1847 he removed to New York. Dr. Sullivan made some important inventions and
discoveries in medicine and surgery, and published pamphlets on steamboat navigation.--John Lang-
don's son, Thomas Russell, clergyman, born in Brookline, Massachusetts, in 1799; died in Somerville,
Massachusetts, 23 December, 1862, was graduated at Harvard in 1817, was settled as a Unitarian
minister at Keene, New Hampshire, in 1825-'35, and taught in Boston from 1835 till his death. He
published "Remarks on Robinson's Sermon on the Divinity of Christ" (Keene, New Hampshire, 1826); "
Letters against the Immediate Abolition of Slavery" (Boston, 1835); "Limits of Responsibility in Reforms"
(1861) ; and other controversial writings. He edited sermons on "Christian Communion."

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM
______________________________________________________

http://tfk.factmonster.com/ce6/people/A0847166.html -
Sullivan, John

Sullivan, John, 1740?95 , American Revolutionary general, b. Somersworth, N.H. He was a lawyer and
a delegate (1774?75, 1780?81) to the Continental Congress but is better remembered as a military

leader. He served at the siege of Boston, and in 1776, while fighting under George Washington at the
battle of Long Island, he was captured by the British. He was exchanged in time to fight at Trenton and
Princeton and later at Brandywine and Germantown. In 1778 he was sent to cooperate with the French
fleet in an attack on Newport. The fleet was forced to withdraw, however, and the attack had to be
given up. The next year, with Gen. James Clinton , he conducted a retaliatory campaign against the
Iroquois and Loyalists on the New York frontier. The Native Americans and Loyalists were defeated in
the battle of Newtown (near Elmira), and much of the Iroquois country was laid waste. Sullivan was
later elected chief executive (1786, 1787, 1789) of New Hampshire. He also helped to put down
Shays's Rebellion and was influential in getting the Constitution ratified.
_________________________________________

See biographies by T. C. Amory (1868, repr. 1968) and C. P. Whittemore (1961).

http://kerry.local.ie/content/34426.shtml/kenmare/history

From Paris Charles wrote to his father in Rome 19th December 1746: "I cannot let slip this occasion to
do him (O'Sullivan) justice by saying I really think he deserves your Majesty's favour." James replied
April 1747, "I have made him a Knight since you desire it and he deserves it." So John O'Sullivan was
'for his attachment to us and his services to Charles, Prince of Wales, created by James III and VIII a
Knight and a Baronet'. O'Sullivan was married to Louisa Fitzgerald.

Their descendants were not without note, their only son: Sir Thomas Herbert O'Sullivan, was an Officer
in the Irish Brigade in France, but because of an assault on his commanding officer, Paul Jones, he was
obliged to fly from France to America where he entered the British service under Sir Henry Clinton at
New York. He served through the American War of Independence on the British side. Did he know that
General John O'Sullivan, who served in the Revolutionary Army with George Washington was the
grandson of Major Philip O'Sullivan of Ardea Castle, across Kenmare Bay from Cappanacuss and a
distant cousin of his own? Sir Thomas later left the English army for the Dutch service in which he died
in 1824.
__________________________________________

Taken from http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/sullivan5.html -

* Sullivan, John (1740-1795) of Durham, Strafford County, N.H. Brother of James Sullivan; father of
George Sullivan. Born in Somersworth, Strafford County, N.H., February 17, 1740. Delegate to
Continental Congress from New Hampshire, 1774, 1780-81; served in the Continental Army during the
Revolutionary War; New Hampshire state attorney general, 1782-86; delegate to New Hampshire state
constitutional convention, 1782-83; member of New Hampshire Governor's Council, 1785-86; President
of New Hampshire, 1786-88, 1789-90; federal judge, 1789. Died January 23, 1795. Interment in
private or family graveyard. See also: congressional biography.
_____________________________________

Taken from http://www.o-sullivan.net/osulling.htm -

Re: GEN. JOHN SULLIVAN
Posted by: Robert G. Sullivan
Date: October 22, 1998 at 17:28:49
In Reply to: GEN. JOHN SULLIVAN by Barb Fleming
of 6269

HI,
I believe I'm a direct decendant of John J.Sullivan. I've just this week started to check on my ancestory.
I'm 62 and relying on a distant memory of grandparentstalking. I realize you are looking for a Tibbets
connection in the Berwick, Maine area.I'm not any help there. Here is the very
scant information I have, most of it from memory and undocumented. John J sullivan was from Exeter,
NH. He had one brother, but not positive on that. He was a general during the revolutionary War, then
a Federal judge, or sorts. He was also "President" of New Hampshire, after the Revoultionary War, and

prior to the actual United States as we know it today. He was a heavy drinker, became deeply indebted
and died broke.. My fathers grand father or great-grandfather was one of John Sullivan's children. My
father had a set of silver cuff links that belonged to John. My daughter has a ring made from one of the
cuff links. My father was William Joseph Sullivan, born in Gloucester, Mass on May 28, 1908. Died at
the Mass Gen Hospital, Boston, on 7/4/58.My grandfather was Micheal J. Sullivan, POB or DOB unkn.
He died in Peabody, Mass around 1948. He was approximaely 63 when he died. He was married to
Sarah Connor, who died in 1945. She was approx 58 when she died. She was born in Exeter, NH, but
DOB is unknown.Getting back to John J sullivan, either hhis brother or son was governor of Mass in the
very early 1800's. Again, all of the above is from memory of stories told years ago. Maybe the above
information will give you some clues in your search. Good Luck Bob Sullivan
______________________________________________

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...=
Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick, Ireland, 1692; school
master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801; Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the
Major General in the Revolution), James (Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist.
Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376, Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://www.jonsullivan.com/osullivan/jcsullivan/chap12.htm -

John, b 17 Feb 1740 MA d 23 Jan 1795 NH. Major General, Continental Army, son of Limerick-born
school teacher, OwenO Sullivan, from O Sullivan-Beare lineage. Member of the first General Congress in
1774. In December of that year he struck the first blow of the revolution by leading a party of
American patriots. In a daring achievement, they rowed by moonlight to the British fort, William and
Mary, near Portsmouth, overpowered the force, and captured approximately one hundred barrels of
powder that were afterwards used at Bunker Hill. m Lydia Wooster. Buried in the family ploy, Durham,
NH.
__________________________________________

Taken from http://tristate.pgh.net/~bsilver/Gene3.htm -

GENEALOGY
Legion of the United States
1792-1796
List 3

*IMPORTANT NOTICE* Please allow three weeks for all Genealogy requests. Our service is free to the
public and all we ask is that a letter of support to preserve Legion Ville be sent to:
Click & Print a letter to Pennsylvania Governor Thomas Ridge
Pennsylvania Governor Thomas Ridge
Room 225, Capitol Building
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120
Please send all Genealogy requests to: bsilver@tristate.pgh.net
Transcribed by Richard C. Knopf, from the West Point Orderly Books, 1792-1796. These books are the
daily orders of the Legion of the United States. Name transcriptions courtesy of Regina Morrow Riley.
Typed by Patrick Riley and John Rosak. Copyright 1997, The Legion Ville Historical Society, Inc.

Sullivan, (Captain)
Sullivan, John
Sullivan, John (Captain)
Sullivan, John (Lieutenant)

___________________________

Taken from http://www.izaak.unh.edu/exhibits/1774/Feud.htm -

Feud:
Major-General John Sullivan & Judge Ebenezer Thompson

Major-General John Sullivan, etching from Thomas C. Amory's The Military Services and Public Life of
Major-General John Sullivan (1869)

Among the many political feuds early existing among the prominent men of the state of New
Hampshire one had broken out between Judge Ebenezer Thompson of Durham and Gen. John Sullivan.
This had been fanned into open warfare from the fact that a quarrel had taken place between their
sons in which the fathers afterwards took sides. Lawsuits were begun and appeals made to the public
through the press. Fortunately for our purpose, one of the points in controversy between them was the
respective parts each had taken at the capture of Fort William and Mary. As many of the participants
were alive, who knew all the facts, both were naturally careful to have, their statements accurate. The
first number of this series appeared in an article in the New Hampshire Spy of Friday, March 6, 1789,
signed "An Enemy to Deceit," in which an unnamed gentleman (Judge Ebenezer Thompson) is accused
of appearing at Exeter at town-meeting to work against the election of General Sullivan as president of
the state, and of keeping back a number of votes in the election of 1786.1 The only statement of
interest to us is the following:

It surely cannot be forgotten that this Gentleman, in company with a number of others, went from
Durham to Portsmouth in December, 1774, to assist in securing the stores at Fort William and Mary,
and when Governor Wentworth suspended him and sundry others on that account he was restored by
making oath before George Atkinson, Esq [then Deputy Secretary], that he was not concerned.

In the New Hampshire Spy of Friday, March 13, 1789, Judge Ebenezer Thompson defends himself
from the attack of "An Enemy to Deceit," whom he assumes to be General Sullivan, and among other
things says:

That I ever was concerned, directly or indirectly, in taking the stores from Fort William and Mary, in
1774, is absolutely false. But had it been the case I should not have thought of applying to, or
receiving from, Congress a large pecuniary reward by single service. But what a gentleinan did who
assisted in the matter will appear by the following extract from a resolution of Congress printed in the
Journal, Vol. VII, p. 159:
"Ordered that the Board of Treasury pass to the credit of John Sullivan in Specie one hundred dollars
as a compensation for the expense incurred by him in securing the military stores and ordinance in Fort
William and Mary, New Hampshire, in the year 1775."

It is a well-known fact that the Hon. John Langdon, Esq., and a number of other persons took the
powder from the aforesaid fort and sent it into the country before the gentleman who received the
reward knew anything about it.
(Signed)
EBENEZER THOMPSON
Durham, March 11, 1789.

In the New Hampshire Spy of March 17, 1789, General Sullivan addresses a reply to "Ebenezer
Thompson, Esq." and after refusing to affirm or deny his authorship of the article signed "An Enemy to
Deceit," he discusses the Exeter affair and the 1786 election and then the following appears:

As different ideas may be affixed to the words directly or indirectly, I shall not assert that you were
directly or indirectly concerned in taking the stores from Fort William & Mary, in 1774 but will relate
facts as they are. In the night of the 18th of December, 1774 [again he has the date from memory
incorrect], a messenger came to my house from the Hon. Col. Long, and I think also signed by
President Langdon, informing that one hundred barrels of powder were sent to my care ; that they had
been to the fort and secured as much of the powder as they could ; and desired me to come down with

a party to secure the remainder, with the cannon and munitions of war, as they were in danger of
being seized by the British ships. I mustered hands--took care of the powder, part of which was lodged
in your house. The next morning we mustered and you went to Portsmouth in company with about
thirty or forty; among whom was the Rev. Mr. Adams, Deacon Norton, Lieut. Durgin, Capt. Jonathan
Woodman, Mr. Aaron Davis, and, I think, Mr. Footman of Dover, and many others,--I think you did not
go down to the fort; that was at night when a number of us mustered what gondolas we could--went to
the fort and secured as much as our vessels could bring away. When the gondolas arrived in Durham
river, it was froze far down, and we were about two days in sawing the ice and getting up the boats,
and one day more in storing and distributing the stores: in this you were obliging enough to assist us;
but whether that was being directly or indirectly concerned, I shall not determine.
Nothing can be more unjust than your calling up again the matter of Congress voting me a hundred
dollars for assisting to take the cannon, etc., from the fort; when it was so fully discussed in the public
prints, about four years since, and the malicious charge refuted. The Hon. Judge Livermore who was in
Congress with me, pliblickly declared and all the then members of Congress will attest, that the vote
was passed in my absence, and upon a petition for my allowance in seperate departments, in which it
was incidentally mentioned my being one of the first opposition and amongst those who first dared to
attack a King's fort. The committee reported me a hundred dollars, and cut me off three quarters of my
allowance in seperate departments; the vote passed before I returned into Congress. I was the person
who rose and violently opposed the measure--told them I was so far from asking or wishing such a
grant, that as it would open a door for similar grants, I could not from principle accept it , but Congress
finding, how much I was cut short in my allowance for seperate commands advised me to a
compromise, to take the sum voted in full and release my demands in seperate departments. Thus by a
compromise I had a hundred dollars voted, for releasing more than a thousand. Any person who wishes
to be satisfied of these facts may apply to the Hon. Judge Livermore, or to any member then in
Congress, or may, by having recourse to the statement of facts by me,--and the proofs adduced in my
answer to letters signed Candidus in the beginning of 1785, be fully convinced of the injustice of the
accusation....

JOHN SULLIVAN
Durham, March 14, I789

The trouble between General Sullivan and Judge Ebenezer Thompson, arising out of this and other
disputes, seems to have been settled the following year by a letter from General Sullivan
**From the Thompson Family Papers (MC 1)**
________________________________

Taken from http://politicalgraveyard.com/geo/NH/ofc/pres.html -

New Hampshire: Presidents
Index of Politicians by Office Held or Sought

Presidents of New Hampshire, 1775-93 (May be incomplete!)
Matthew Thornton 1775-76 Meshech Weare 1776-85 John Langdon 1785-86 John Sullivan 1786-88
John Langdon 1788-89 John Sullivan 1789-90 Josiah Bartlett 1790-93
______________________________________________

Taken from http://www.seacoastnh.com/framers/sullivan.html -

View: Full List Of Framers
Links: Much More on Sullivan

[John Sullivan] JOHN SULLIVAN was one of the best known New Hampshire figures in the Revolution,
but he was also one of the most controversial.

Sullivan was born in the parish of Somersworth on February 17, 1740, the third son of Irish
redemptioner immigrants. His father was the local schoolmaster and he made sure his son received a
good education. Sullivan read the law with Samuel Livermore, and in 1764 he bought three acres on

the bank of the Oyster River in Durham and hung out his shingle there, becoming the town's first
lawyer.

Rich Lawyer, Brittish Friend

Vain and ambitious, the black-haired lawyer was determined to get rich. His methods included
foreclosing on debts owed him and suing his neighbors. Soon he was hated by most of Durham. More
than once mobs of his victims attacked him. In June of 1766, a petition signed by 133 citizens of
Durham was presented to the General Court, asking for relief from the "Oppressive Extortive Behavior
of one Mr. John Sullivan." With the aid of a few favorable depositions from his friends, Sullivan talked
the court into dismissing the petition and then sued unsuccessfully for libel. Whatever his ethics, the
records show that between September of 1764 and May of 1772 Sullivan won 35 actions and more
than 3000 pounds.

As the years passed, Sullivan increased his holdings in the Durham area and gradually improved his
relations with the town's residents. In the late 1760s Sullivan supported Britain and became a favorite
of Royal Governor John Wentworth. Because of his friendship with Wentworth, Sullivan was
commissioned as a major in the militia. He had attained all the things he had worked for since his
arrival in Durham: wealth, power, respect and leadership. Logically, John Sullivan should have been
content to help maintain the status quo, but he was an ambitious man and seldom happy with what he
had.

Converted To Revolution

As relations between Britain and America eroded in the early 1770s, Sullivan joined the ranks of the
dissidents. On July 21, 1774, the First Provincial Congress of New Hampshire met in Exeter. Sullivan
attended, representing Durham, and was elected as a delegate to the First Continental Congress. At
Philadelphia, he became involved in many issues, generally aligning himself with the radicals from
Massachusetts.

In November, 1774, Sullivan returned to New Hampshire and on December 15, he committed himself
totally to the Revolution when he led a raid on Fort William and Mary in New Castle to secure arms for
the rebel cause.

Early in 1775, Sullivan and John Langdon were elected to the Second Continental Congress. At
Philadelphia, the delegates voted to take on the regulation of the army and appointed Sullivan a
brigadier general.

Sullivan's military career was long and controversial. After a nine-month siege the American Army
drove the British out of Boston; in the spring of '76 Washington sent Sullivan to Canada. There he took
command of the sick, dispirited, and mutinous remnants of the army that had invaded Canada the
previous year. Stubborn and with high hopes of military victories, Sullivan wrote Washington that he
was "Determin'd to hold," but he was soon forced to retreat. Sullivan's enemies in Congress criticized
him severely for the retreat, but on August 9 the delegates voted to promote him to the rank of major
general. At about this time, Washington described Sullivan as "active, spirited, and Zealously attach'd
to the cause" and went on to say that he had "a little tincture of vanity . . . an over desire of being
popular, which now and then leads him into some embarressments."

In August of 1776, Sullivan joined Washington, who was confronting the British Gen. Howe in New York.
On August 20 he received command of Long Island, but three days later Washington took part of his
command away and gave it to Gen. Israel Putnam. The disaster that followed was due in part to the
poor definition of the division of command. In the melee the British and Hessians attacked the
Americans from both sides and routed them. Brave to the point of being fool hardy, Sullivan, with a
pistol in each hand, engaged the Hessians in a running battle in a corn field and was captured.

While a prisoner of war, Sullivan served as an intermediary between Gen. Howe's brother, Adm.
Richard Howe, and the Continental Congress, carrying the admiral's peace proposals. The negotiations
collapsed almost immediately and Sullivan was again criticized by Congress. John Adams called him a "

decoy duck whom Lord Howe had sent among us to seduce us into a renunciation of our independence.
"

After Sullivan was released in a prisoner exchange, he rejoined Washington in New Jersey. On
December 25, 1776, the American forces crossed the Delaware River and hit the Hessians in Trenton.
Sullivan was in the thick of the fighting. He and his command captured a vital bridge across the
Assanpink Creek and sealed the mercenaries into Trenton. Sullivan finally had his military victory, and
his good luck continued through the early part of January, 1777, as his forces helped push the British
out of Princeton.

The beginning of 1777 found Sullivan in high spirits, but these did not last long. He was soon arguing
with George Washington, the Continental Congress, and everybody else over commands and
promotions. In response to Sullivan's requests and complaints, Washington wrote to him saying, "No
other officer of rank in the whole army has so often conceived himself neglected, slighted and ill-
treated as you have done, and none I am sure has had less cause than yourself to entertain such ideas."

In August Sullivan failed in an attempt to capture Staten Island and in September he commanded the
right flank at the disastrous Battle of Brandywine. A court of inquiry absolved him of any blame for the
failure at Staten Island, but his enemies in Congress made him the scapegoat of Brandywine.

In October Sullivan's bad luck accompanied him to Germantown, another disaster. From there he went
to an inconsequential command in Rhode Island in 1778 and on an indecisive campaign against the
Iroquois of the Six Nations in New York in 1779. Sick, broke and at odds with Congress, Sullivan retired
from the army in November of 1779 and returned to New Hampshire.

Governor, Judge, Drinker

Sullivan's retirement was short lived. In New Hampshire he was a hero, and the state re-elected him to
the Continental Congress, where he raised his voice on such issues as New Hampshire's land claims in
Vermont, Revolutionary finances and peace with Britain. In need of money, Sullivan accepted a loan of
68 guineas from the French minister at Philadelphia, the Chevalier de la Luzerne. His enemies in
Congress were quickly on his back with charges that he had taken a bribe and was on the French
payroll. Embarrassed once more, he left Congress for good in August of 1781.

Back in Durham, Sullivan busied himself with recouping his wasted fortune and with politics. He served
as attorney general and as speaker of the house. He and John Langdon led the long legislative
campaign which resulted in New Hampshire becoming the ninth state to ratify the Constitution on June
21, 1788. In 1789 he was elected to a third and last term as president and in the same year President
Washington appointed him as a federal judge for the district of New Hampshire. Sullivan's appointment
was something of a personal endorsement as Washington only appointed men of outstanding ability
and unquestionable loyalty. Sullivan never resigned his judgeship although his health prevented him
from sitting on the bench after May of 1792.

John Sullivan's last years were miserable ones. He became involved in land feuds in Durham, went into
debt and grew senile. His daily drinking irritated an ulcer and he suffered from a progressive nervous
disease. Only a shadow of his former self, he was forsaken by all but his family and a few friends. He
died in his home on January 23, 1795, a man who found happiness only in action and peace only in
death.

By Steve Adams

SOURCE: Originally published in "NH: Years of Revolution," Profiles Publications and the NH
Bicentennial Commision, 1976. Reprinted by permission of the authors.
Copyright © 1997 SeacoastNH.com
__________________________

Another Viewpoint:

Major Gen. John Sullivan

Honored NH Mason
By Gerald D. Foss, Grand Historian
St. John's Lodge #1,Portsmouth, NH

John Sullivan was bom in Somersworth, New Hampshire, February 17, 1740. He studied law and was
admitted to practice before the courts of the Royal Province of New Hampshire. His home and place of
business were in Durham, New Hampshire. Durham sent him to the Provincial Assembly early in 1774
as its representative. This led to his appointment as a delegate to the first Continental Congress.
Appointed brigadier general in the Continental Army in 1775, he was promoted to major general in
1776. After being engaged in several prominent battles of that war he resigned his commission late in
1779.

He was sent to the Continental Congress again in 1780 and 1781. Attomey-general of New Hampshire
from 1782 to 1786, he was chosen President (Governor) of New Hampshire in 1786 and 1787. He was
Speaker of the House in 1788 and also president of the Constitutional Convention which ratified the
Federal Constitution. This made New Hampshire the state to establish the United States of America. He
was chosen presidential elector for 1789 and cast his vote for President George Washington. Again he
was elected President (Governor) of the State of New Hampshire in 1789. President Washington
appointed him as the first judge of the Federal District Court in the latter part of 1789, a position which
he held at his death. Harvard College conferred upon Sullivan the degree of Master of Arts in 1780 and
Dartmouth College be- stowed the degree of Doctor of Laws on him in 1789.

Many honors have been accorded General John Sullivan. Among them are the incorporation of the
Town of Sullivan in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, in 1787; establishment in 1827 of the County of
Sullivan, New Hampshire; erection of a granite monurnent by the State of New Hampshire in 1894 near
his home in Durham, New Hampshire. More recently, a steel span across the Piscataqua River from
Newington to Dover Point was named in his honor. In 1929, the United States Post Of- fice issued a
commemorative postage stamp bearing his likeness in honor of his victorious New York expedition
against the Indians. The State of New York honored him in 1879 by erecting a monument at Ithaca.
The Town of Epping, New Hampshire, which long had a Masonic lodge called Sullivan Lodge No. 19,
renamed it Major General John Sullivan Lodge No. 2., F. & A.M., a few years ago.

Sullivan's Masonic career commenced in old St. John's Lodge Portsmouth, NH on March 19, 1767. That
evening the lodge held a regular communication in the house of Isaac Williams of Portsmouth. The
minutes of that meeting, in part: "This evening proposed by Br. Hall Jackson, Mr. John Sullivan, who
was balloted for, and unanimously agreed to be made this evening and acquainted him the result of the
Lodge, he was ready and according was made a Mason this evening." It would be twenty-two years
before the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire would be established, but of the first officers chosen in
1789, four were present March 19, 1767. John Sullivan, Hall Jackson, George Turner and Joseph Bass.
John Sullivan received the degree of Master Mason December 28, 1768,in the Master's Lodge at
Portsmouth.

On this date the lodge room was located in the new Earl of Halifax Tavern, owned and operated by
Brother John Stavers. Although the name of the tavern had been changed to Pitt Tavern during the
Revolutionary War, it was in the same building that deputies from Masonic lodges met July 8, 1789 to
organize the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire. From 1768 to 1774 the minutes record the occasional
presence of John Sullivan, but since his home was about twelve miles from the lodge room it is to be
expected his attendance was not as regular as of those living in close proximity to it. On November 22,
1775 the St. John's Lodge minutes record that Major Joseph Cilley was made a Mason gratis "for his
Good Services in Defense of his Country." Brigadier General John Sullivan was present this evening.

This date was during the period in which General George Washington had ordered Brigadier General
Sullivan to Portsmouth to check harbor defenses. The records show that Major General John Sullivan on
the evening of March 27, 1777, proposed that Major Winborn Adams be made a Mason. It was done.
Unfortunately, Lt. Col. Adams was killed less than six months later leading his regiment into battle at
Bemis Heights. While General Sullivan was in charge of the campaign to secure Rhode Island he visited

the Providence Lodge of Freemasons frequently. When he was ordered to depart from Rhode Island,
the Providence Lodge voted that a committee present an address "to our worthy Brother Major-General
John Sullivan, in behalf of this lodge . . . ." It was published in the Providence Gazette of March 27,
1779. The message extends "most cordial Thanks, for the particular Honor you have done them, in so
frequently associating with them in Lodge;". It is a touching tribute. General Sullivan's reply to the
address is also interesting for it shows clearly his knowledge and approbation of Masonry. In 1788 St.
John's Lodge adopted its fourth set of bylaws. At the end of the bylaws, as was the custom, each
member signed his name. The well-known signature of "jno Sullivan" appears, in his own handwriting,
to this set of laws.

In the spring of 1789 several New Hampshire Masons were promoting the establishment of its own
Grand Lodge. The first meeting was held in the Pitt Tavem July 8, 1789. Sullivan, then President of
New Hampshire, was elected the first Grand Master. He was absent, but at the second meeting, held
July 16, 1789, he was present to accept the office. Because he had not served as a Worshipful Master
of a symbolic lodge, there was a delay in his installation as Grand Master. It was arranged for him to be
elected Worshipful Master of St. John's Lodge at its next annual meeting.

On December 3, 1789 , St. John's Lodge held its annual meeting and elected Sullivan Worshipful Master
for the ensuing year. He was duly installed as Master of his lodge December 28, 1789, and conducted
his first meeting January 4, 1790. On April 8, 1790, plans were completed for the elaborate installation
ceremonies of the Grand Lodge officers for the first time in New Hampshire. The event was held in the
Assembly Hall on Vaughan Street because the crowd was too large for the lodge room. Brother and
Doctor Hall Jackson, the oldest Master in the chair, installed John Sullivan into the office of Most
Worshipful Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in and for the State of New
Hampshire. Grand Master Sullivan then proceeded to appoint and install the other officers who would
serve with him during the ensuing year.

The regular quarterly communication of the Grand Lodge was held April 28, 1790, at which time Most
Worshipful John Sullivan presided. Six months later he declined to serve further because of ill health.
On October 27, 1790, Dr. Hall Jackson, his proponent of 1767, was elected to succeed Sullivan as
Grand Master. After a long illness, Sullivan died at his home in Durham January 23, 1795 and was
buried in the family cemetery situated in back of his home. In this burial ground, in addition to a
suitable gravestone, is a large stone on which is mounted a bronze marker. The latter was placed there
by the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire in 1964, that the spot might be found if occasion should require
it.

SOURCE: Excerpted with permission from "Three Centuries of Freemasonry in New Hampshire" by
Gerald Foss, NH Publishing, Somersworth, 1972.
St. John's Lodge #1

Copyright © 2001 SeacoastNH.com
_______________________________________

Taken from http://ceinfo.unh.edu/counties/sullivan/sullhome2.htm -

About Sullivan County:
County Seat: Newport

Sullivan County was organized in September, 1827. It was named for General John Sullivan, a
Revolutionary War hero, New Hampshire attorney general and judge. Charlestown's Fort #4 played an
important role during the French and Indian Wars. The town of Cornish, first settled in 1765 was a site
where mast pines were cut for the King's ships. Sullivan county was the birthplace of the American
machine tool industry and is the site of several historic mill communities.

Sullivan County is located in western New Hampshire and shares a thirty-six mile stretch of the
Connecticut River with our neighbor Vermont. It consists of 528 square miles and has population of 38,
592. Eighty-Five percent of the landscape is in forest land and twelve percent of the county is prime

farm land. Many of these 18th century farms are still in the same family. Primary industries include
manufacturing, retail, health and higher education.

There is one city and fourteen towns in Sullivan County. The population of the city of Claremont is 14,
050. A special feature in Claremont is their Opera House, a completely restored 1800's theater.
Acoustically it is considered "one of the best facilities" in all of New England. The town of Newport also
has an opera house. Both Opera Houses bring forward a variety of local talent as well as, cultural
experiences from across the United States including dances, concerts and plays. Another rather unique
feature of the area is a Hang Gliding Flight Park. Claremont is also home to New Hampshire Community
Technical College. A public, two year college offering career oriented education for adults. It is also
home to a branch of the University System of New Hampshire's College for Life Long Learning (C.L.L).
The Connecticut Valley Region of C.L.L. delivers college programs to adults in the communities in which
they live and work , using the resources of the entire University System. Valley Regional Hospital is also
located in Claremont.

Throughout Sullivan County there are a variety of recreational opportunities to enjoy including hiking,
biking, snowmobiling, cross country and alpine skiing, as well as boating and fishing. Mount Sunapee
State Park includes a 200 acre network of trails for skiing and hiking and sparkling lakes for swimming.
Enjoy the view from a chairlift ride to the top of the highest mountain in southern New Hampshire.
Enjoy the annual state arts and crafts show and other events at Sunapee State Park.. Other sites
unique to Sullivan County include: Old Fort #4, a revolutionary stockade in Charlestown, the Cornish-
Windsor covered bridge (the longest of its kind in the U.S.), and the Saint-Gaudens National Historic
site, the home and studio of a famous sculptor and location of summer concerts and art exhibits.

As in the other nine counties, Sullivan County has three elected commissioners, who are responsible for
administering the 15+ million dollar county budget. Local governments usually consist of a volunteer
board of selectman with a paid administrator. In addition, many towns have volunteer fire departments,
conservation commissions, planning and zoning boards. Public safety is ensured with the cooperative
efforts of local police, the county sheriff and State Police.
__________________________________________

Taken from http://www.seacoastnh.com/framers/sullivan.html -

Many honors have been accorded General John Sullivan. Among them are the incorporation of the
Town of Sullivan in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, in 1787; establishment in 1827 of the County of
Sullivan, New Hampshire; erection of a granite monurnent by the State of New Hampshire in 1894 near
his home in Durham, New Hampshire. More recently, a steel span across the Piscataqua River from
Newington to Dover Point was named in his honor. In 1929, the United States Post Of- fice issued a
commemorative postage stamp bearing his likeness in honor of his victorious New York expedition
against the Indians. The State of New York honored him in 1879 by erecting a monument at Ithaca.
The Town of Epping, New Hampshire, which long had a Masonic lodge called Sullivan Lodge No. 19,
renamed it Major General John Sullivan Lodge No. 2., F. & A.M., a few years ago.

Sullivan's Masonic career commenced in old St. John's Lodge Portsmouth, NH on March 19, 1767. That
evening the lodge held a regular communication in the house of Isaac Williams of Portsmouth. The
minutes of that meeting, in part: "This evening proposed by Br. Hall Jackson, Mr. John Sullivan, who
was balloted for, and unanimously agreed to be made this evening and acquainted him the result of the
Lodge, he was ready and according was made a Mason this evening." It would be twenty-two years
before the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire would be established, but of the first officers chosen in
1789, four were present March 19, 1767. John Sullivan, Hall Jackson, George Turner and Joseph Bass.
John Sullivan received the degree of Master Mason December 28, 1768,in the Master's Lodge at
Portsmouth.

On this date the lodge room was located in the new Earl of Halifax Tavern, owned and operated by
Brother John Stavers. Although the name of the tavern had been changed to Pitt Tavern during the
Revolutionary War, it was in the same building that deputies from Masonic lodges met July 8, 1789 to

organize the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire. From 1768 to 1774 the minutes record the occasional
presence of John Sullivan, but since his home was about twelve miles from the lodge room it is to be
expected his attendance was not as regular as of those living in close proximity to it. On November 22,
1775 the St. John's Lodge minutes record that Major Joseph Cilley was made a Mason gratis "for his
Good Services in Defense of his Country." Brigadier General John Sullivan was present this evening.

This date was during the period in which General George Washington had ordered Brigadier General
Sullivan to Portsmouth to check harbor defenses. The records show that Major General John Sullivan on
the evening of March 27, 1777, proposed that Major Winborn Adams be made a Mason. It was done.
Unfortunately, Lt. Col. Adams was killed less than six months later leading his regiment into battle at
Bemis Heights. While General Sullivan was in charge of the campaign to secure Rhode Island he visited
the Providence Lodge of Freemasons frequently. When he was ordered to depart from Rhode Island,
the Providence Lodge voted that a committee present an address "to our worthy Brother Major-General
John Sullivan, in behalf of this lodge . . . ." It was published in the Providence Gazette of March 27,
1779. The message extends "most cordial Thanks, for the particular Honor you have done them, in so
frequently associating with them in Lodge;". It is a touching tribute. General Sullivan's reply to the
address is also interesting for it shows clearly his knowledge and approbation of Masonry. In 1788 St.
John's Lodge adopted its fourth set of bylaws. At the end of the bylaws, as was the custom, each
member signed his name. The well-known signature of "jno Sullivan" appears, in his own handwriting,
to this set of laws.

In the spring of 1789 several New Hampshire Masons were promoting the establishment of its own
Grand Lodge. The first meeting was held in the Pitt Tavem July 8, 1789. Sullivan, then President of
New Hampshire, was elected the first Grand Master. He was absent, but at the second meeting, held
July 16, 1789, he was present to accept the office. Because he had not served as a Worshipful Master
of a symbolic lodge, there was a delay in his installation as Grand Master. It was arranged for him to be
elected Worshipful Master of St. John's Lodge at its next annual meeting.

On December 3, 1789 , St. John's Lodge held its annual meeting and elected Sullivan Worshipful Master
for the ensuing year. He was duly installed as Master of his lodge December 28, 1789, and conducted
his first meeting January 4, 1790. On April 8, 1790, plans were completed for the elaborate installation
ceremonies of the Grand Lodge officers for the first time in New Hampshire. The event was held in the
Assembly Hall on Vaughan Street because the crowd was too large for the lodge room. Brother and
Doctor Hall Jackson, the oldest Master in the chair, installed John Sullivan into the office of Most
Worshipful Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in and for the State of New
Hampshire. Grand Master Sullivan then proceeded to appoint and install the other officers who would
serve with him during the ensuing year.

The regular quarterly communication of the Grand Lodge was held April 28, 1790, at which time Most
Worshipful John Sullivan presided. Six months later he declined to serve further because of ill health.
On October 27, 1790, Dr. Hall Jackson, his proponent of 1767, was elected to succeed Sullivan as
Grand Master. After a long illness, Sullivan died at his home in Durham January 23, 1795 and was
buried in the family cemetery situated in back of his home. In this burial ground, in addition to a
suitable gravestone, is a large stone on which is mounted a bronze marker. The latter was placed there
by the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire in 1964, that the spot might be found if occasion should require
it.

SOURCE: Excerpted with permission from "Three Centuries of Freemasonry in New Hampshire" by
Gerald Foss, NH Publishing, Somersworth, 1972.
St. John's Lodge #1

Copyright © 2001 SeacoastNH.com.
______________________________________

Taken from http://mizar5.com/cvlh/home.htm -

Sent by General Washington, John Sullivan and his men successfully routed the Iroquois from the

Chemung River Valley, thus opening the territory to settlers during the American Revolutionary War.
Now marked with an impressive obelisk, (pictured above left) the Newtown Battlefield Reservation is
the home for the Living History Center.
_____________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.chemungcounty.com/sullivan.html -

Sullivan's Monument/Newtown Battlefield, featuring a mix of history and nature, draws campers, hikers
and picnickers alike to its rolling wooded hills. [Nature Trail]

At this quiet, wooded hilltop retreat, you can pitch a tent or stay in a rustic cabin. Either way, you'll
enjoy hot showers, flush toilets and a trailer dump station.

If you're a daytripper, pack a lunch and hike the many nature trails within the park...or enjoy the view
from the historic monument overlook, complete with interpretive displays.

In addition to these displays, the Cheumung Valley Living History Center also sponsors battle
reenactments and other events.

For more pictures of Sullivan's Monument and Newtown Battlefield click here.

Hours:Sullivan's Monument is open 10 AM to sunset daily, from Memorial Day until Columbus Day.
Specific facility, program hours and availability vary seasonally.
Directions: (Newtown Battlefield Reservation) Rt. 17, 6 miles south of Elmira, follow signs for Newtown
Battlefield Reservation.
For More Information, call Sullivan's Monument and Camping Reservations at 607-732-6067
___________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.seacoastnh.com/history/rev/washtour.html -

October 31 - November 4, 1789

For more on Washington and Lear

[george washington] For an 18th century New Hampshire citizen , the historic moment packed all the
thrill of a moon walk. The first American President took his first step onto New Hampshire soil in a
burst of celebration. Revolutionary spin-doctors would have placed George Washington's popularity
rating in October 1789 on a scale somewhere between a king and a god. People loved the conquering
general whose name remains a synonym for democracy.

With his precedent-setting decision to tour all of the United States while in office, Washington used his
popularity to sew together the loosely knit confederation of states at a critical time. His four week New
England journey, later followed by a tour of the South, brought Washington from New York,
Connecticut and Massachusetts to the banks of the Merrimack River on October 31. Having previously
traveled up the North Shore coast from Salem, Washington breakfasted in Newburyport, but traveled a
few miles inland to find a shallow spot to cross the Merrimack River. At a point on the Amesbury road,
historians believe, he was ferried across the state line as local militia and lighthorsemen ceremoniously
made the border exchange.

John Sullivan , "the president" of New Hampshire, out-pomped his neighbor states by assembling a
long receiving line of NH's political elite and an escort of 700 cavalry. Though Seabrook is not
mentioned in the accounts, the day trip apparently moved from there through Hampton Falls, Hampton
and to Greenland where Washington rode past cheering citizens on horseback.

Hail Washington!

The Presidential parade arrived in Portsmouth at 3 p.m. along what is today Middle Street. Newspaper
accounts describe narrow streets packed with cheering onlookers, church bells and 13-gun salutes to
honor the united colonies (though Rhode Island and North Carolina were not yet officially members.)
The changing times are evident in the rapidly changing street names. King Street, for example, had

only years before been changed to Congress Street . Since Portsmouth was then the New Hampshire
capital city, Washington marched up Congress Street into Market Square where citizens sang lengthy
original odes to the tune of ìGod Save the King.î A published sample verse reads:

"Those shouts ascending to the sky,
Proclaim great WASHINGTON is nigh!
Hail Nature's boast -- Columbia's Son,
Welcome! Welcome WASHINGTON."

Washington was received at the State House which no longer stands in the square. Children wearing
hats with colored quills to designate their schools had been assigned front row Because Washington's
whistle-stop New England tour had been suddenly announced, townspeople had prepared the elaborate
ceremony in just two days.

After the festivities, the President took lodging in the Brewster Tavern on the corner of modern day
Court and Pleasant Streets. That building too no longer stands, but after dinner with local VIPs,
Washington records that he took tea at John Langdon's fine home next door, an historic site still open
to the public. Langdon, a NH senator and ship builder, had recently tussled with John Paul Jones over
equipping of the tall ship America. November 1 was a Sunday and Washington attended morning
church services a few blocks walk toward the harbor at St. John's Episcopal. The current brick church
at the top of Chapel Hill was rebuilt when the wooden one burned in 1806. Attending a second
afternoon service was customary. With his secretary Tobias Lear of Portsmouth, the Chief Executive
heard a very flattering speech at the North Church in Market Square. Only the weathervane of this
Portsmouth landmark remains of the structure Washington visited. According to Washington's journal,
he spent the afternoon in his room at the tavern writing letters.

Harbor Tour

Washington's third day in New Hampshire is best summarized in his own words: "Monday 2d. Having
made previous preparations for it, attended by the President (John Sullivan), Mr. Langdon and some
other Gentlemen, I went in a boat to view the harbour of Portsmouth: which is well secured against all
winds; and from its narrow entrance from the Sea and passage up to the Town, may be perfectly
guarded by any approach by water...The anchorage is also good, and the shipping may lay close to the
Docks, etca., when at the town.

In my way to the Mouth of the harbour, I stopped at a place called Kittery, in the Province of Maine,
the river Piscataqua being the boundary between New Hampshire and it. From thence I went to the old
Fort (formerly built while under the English government on an Island which is at the entrance of the
harbour, and where the Light House stands. As we passed this Fort we were saluted by 13 Guns.
Having Lines, we proceeded to the Fishing banks a little without the Harbour, and Fished for Cod; but it
was not being a proper time of tide, we only caught two, with w'ch, about 1 o'clock, we returned to
town. "

It isn't known whether Washington's boat ride was the germ of the idea for the country's first naval
shipyard in Kittery. Although the current structures are not of Washington's era, the lighthouse and Fort
William and Mary are in the harbor at what was Great Island, now the town of New Castle. Historians
debate whether the Chief Executive also stopped by Fort McClary in Kittery and visited a former British
Governor Col. Michael Wentworth at what is today the preserved Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion that sits
right on the river In Portsmouth.

That afternoon Washington heard an laudatory address and dined with a "Circle of Ladies" at the
Langdon's. According to his notes, he retired for the evening at 7 p.m. at the tavern and wrote a
response letter to the town of Portsmouth, as well as letters to Newburyport and Marblehead which he
had not yet finished.

Weeks earlier in Boston, Washington had been too busy to sit for a portrait to be hung in Fanieul Hall.
But the aggressive Dutch-born artist, Christian Gullager had pursued Washington to Portsmouth and on

Tuesday the President posed two hours for the portrait (see picture at top of this page). After a
meeting further down Court Street at the Pitt Tavern, now part of Strawbery Banke, Washington made
a personal visit. He passed through the residential Puddle Dock area near the Liberty Pole at what is
now Prescott Park. Here, free of the crowds and adulattion, the first Commander in Chief of the United
States of America took a quiet moment to visit the family of his loyal secretary Tobias Lear in a house
now part of the Strawbery Banke Museum.

By evening Washington was back in the thick of things, attending a gala with up to 75 handsome local
ladies and their escorts at the grand downtown Assembly Hall. The local newspaper reported that 11
toasts were offered and it is assumed the famous freed slaves, Prince Whipple and his brother Cuffee,
were in attendance. The President, who usually retired early, stayed until 9 p.m.. He had requested no
ceremonies surrounding his departure and at 7:30 the next morning, Washington and his eight staff
members slipped quietly out of town by carriage en route to Haverhill, Massachusetts.

Exit Via Exeter

Wednesday, November 4 was his last day in New Hampshire. Washington records that they made the
14 mile journey back via Greenland to Exeter, arriving by 10 a.m. It seems likely he stopped in
Stratham to pay his respects to Paine Wingate, the other NH state Senator serving with Thomas
Langdon who had monopolized the President's attention for days. In his journal, Washington noted that
Exeter was the state's second most important town, yet he passed through on horseback in just one
hour. He seemed unaware of the jealousy between the rival towns and recorded mostly details of the
many water falls and factories there. Stopping at the Folsom Tavern with Major Nicholas Gilman,
Washington refused, and later regretted, an invitation to stay the night.

Despite Exeter's key role in Revolutionary politics, the President departed quickly, and passing through
the colonial village of Kingston, most likely made a final stop. Kingston was home to Doctor Josiah
Bartlett , then a founding member of the U.S. Supreme Court, past signer of the Declaration of
Independence and soon to be the first governor of New Hampshire. In his book, George Washington in
New Hampshire, author Elwin Page notes the irony of Washington's inconspicuous departure in contrast
to the pomp of his arrival. In ill health, without attending VIPs, cheering crowds, body guards, militia or
media reporters, Washington passed through the little town of Plaistow, slipped back across the
Merrimack River and out of New Hampshire.

By J. Dennis Robinson
© 1997 SeacoastNH.com. All rights reserved.

SEE ALSO
The Tobias Lear House
Tobias, We Hardly Knew Ye
Gov. John Langdon House
George Washington's Letters
at the Library of Congress

Read The Book:
Primary Source: George Washington in New Hampshire
by Elwin Page. Originally published in 1932
__________________________________________

Taken from http://home.ptd.net/~revwar/tocong.html -

Major General Sullivan's Official Report.

[From the Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser of Tuesday, October 19, 1779.]

The Chronicle of his Expedition against the Iroquois in 1779. -- The devastation of the Genesee country.

Teaogo, Sept. 30, 1779.



Sir: -- In mine of the 30th ultimo to His Excellency George Washington, and by him transmitted to
Congress, I gave an account of the victory obtained by this army over the enemy at Newtown, on the
29th August. I now do myself the honor to inform Congress of the progress of this army, and the most
material occurrences which have since taken place.

The time taking up in destroying the corn, in the neighborhood of Newtown, employing the army near
two days, and then appearing a probability that the destruction of all the crops might take a much
greater length of time than was first apprehended, and being likewise convinced, by an accurate
calculation, that it could not be possible to effect the destruction of the Indian country, with the
provision on hand which was all I had in store, and indeed all I had pack horses to transport from
Teaogo; in this situation I could think of but one expedient to answer the purposes of the expedition,
which was to prevail, if possible, on the soldiers to content themselves with half a pound of flour and
the same quantity of fresh beef per day, rather than leave the important business unfinished. I
therefore drew up an address to them, a copy of which I have the honor to enclose you, which being
read, was answered by three cheers from the whole army. Not one dissenting voice was heard from
either officer or soldier. I had then on hand, from the best calculation I could make, twenty-two
pounds of flour and sixteen pounds of beef per man; the former liable to many deductions by rains,
crossing rivers and defiles; the latter much more so, from the almost unavoidable loss of cattle, when
suffered to range the woods at night for their support. I was, however, encouraged in the belief, that I
should be enabled to effect the destruction and total ruin of the Indian territories by this truly noble
resolution of the army, for which, I know not whether the public stand more indebted to the pursuasive
arguments which the officers began to use, or to the virtuous disposition of the soldiers, whose prudent
and cheerful compliance with the requisition anticipated all their wishes, and rendered pursuasion
unnecessary.

I sent back all my heavy artillery on the night of the 30th, retaining only four brass three pounders, and
a small howitzer; loaded the necessary ammunition on horseback, and marched early on the 31st for
Catherine's Town. On our way we destroyed a small settlement of eight houses, and a town called
Konowhola, of about twenty houses, situated on a peninsula at the conflux of the Teaogo and Cayuga
branches.--- We also destroyed several fields of corn. Form this point Colonel Dayton was detached
with his regiment and the rifle corps up the Teaogo about six miles, who destroyed several large fields
of corn. The army resumed their march, and encamped within thirteen miles and a half of Catherine's
Town where we arrived the next day, although we had a road to open for the artillery, through a
swamp nine miles in extant, and almost impervious. We arrived near Catherine's Town in the night, and
moved on, in hopes to surprise it, but found it forsaken. On the next morning an old woman belonging
to the Cayuga nation was found in the woods. She informed me that on the night after the battle of
Newtown, the enemy, having fled the whole night, arrived there in great confusion early the next day;
that she heard the warriors tell their women they were conquered and must fly; that they had a great
many killed and vast numbers wounded. - She likewise heard the lamentations of many at the loss of
their connections. In addition to this, she assured us, that some other warriors had met Butler at this
place and desired him to return and fight again. But to this request they could not obtain no
satisfactory answer, for, as they observed, "Butler's mouth was closed." The warriors who had been in
the action were equally averse to the proposal, and would think of nothing but flight, and removal of
their families; that they kept runners on every mountain to observe the movements of our army, who
reported early in the day on which we arrived, that our advance was very rapid; upon which all those
who had not been before sent off, fled with precipitation, leaving her without any possible means of
escape. She said that Brant had taken most of the wounded up the Teaogo in canoes. I was, from
many circumstances, fully convinced of the truth and sincerity of her declaration, and the more so, as
we had, the day we left Newtown, discovered a great number of bloody packs, arms and
accoutrements, thrown away in the road, and in the woods each side of it. Besides which, we
discovered a number of recent graves, one of which has been since opened, containing the bodies of
two persons who had died by wounds.

These circumstances, when added to that of so many warriors being left dead on the field, a

circumstance not common with Indians, were sufficient to corroborate the woman's declaration, and to
prove what I before conjectured, that the loss of the enemy was much greater than was at first
apprehended. I have never been able to ascertain, with any degree of certainty, what force the enemy
opposed to us at Newtown, but from the best accounts I have been able to collect, and from the
opinion of General Poor, and others, who had the best opportunity of viewing their numbers, as well as
from the extant of their lines, I suppose them to have been 1,500, though two prisoners, whom I
believe totally ignorant of the number at any post but their own, as well as of the enemy's disposition,
estimate them at only eight hundred, while they allow that five companies of rangers, all the warriors
of Seneca, and six other nations, were collected at this place. In order to determine their force with as
much accuracy as in my power, I examined their breastworks, and found the extant more than half a
mile. Several bastions ran out in its front to flank the lines in every part. A small block-house, formerly
a dwelling, was also manned in the front. The breastwork appeared to have been fully manned, though
I supposed with only one rank. --- Some parts of their works being low, they were obliged to dig holes
in the ground to cover themselves in part. This circumstance enabled me to judge the distance
between their men in the works. A very thin scattering line, designed, as I suppose, for communicating
signals, was continued from those works to that part of the mountain which General Poor ascended,
where they had a very large body, which was designed, I imagined, to fall on our flank. The distance
from the breastwork to this was at least one mile and a half. From thence to the hill in the rear of our
right, was another scattering line of about one mile, and on the hill a breastwork with a strong party,
destined, as it is supposed, to fall on our rear. But General Clinton being ordered so far to the right,
occasioned his flank to pass the mountain, which obliged them to abandon their post. From these
circumstances, as well as from the opinions of others, I cannot conceive their numbers to be less than
what I have before mentioned.

The army spent one day at Catherine's destroying corn and fruit trees. We burnt the town, consisting
of thirty houses. The next day we encamped near a small scattering settlement of about eight houses
and two days after reached Kendaia, which we also found deserted. Here one of the inhabitants of
Wioming, who had been last year captured by the enemy, escaped from them and joined us. He
informed us that the enemy had left the town in the greatest confusion three days before our arrival.
He said he had conversed with some of the tories on their return form the action at Newtown, who
assured him they had great numbers killed and wounded, and there was no safety but in flight. He
heard Butler tell them he must try to make a stand at Kanadasega; but they declared they would not
throw away their lives in vain attempt to oppose such an army. He also heard many of the Indian
women lamenting the loss of their connections and added that Brandt had taken most of the wounded
up the Teaogo in water crafts which had been provided for that purpose in case of necessity. It was his
opinion that the King of Kanadasega was killed as he saw him go down but not return and gave a
description of his person and dress corresponding with those of one found on the field of action. ---
Kendaia consisted of about twenty houses which were reduced to ashes, the houses were neatly built
and finished. The army spent nearly a day at this place, in destroying corn and fruit trees of which
there was a great abundance. Many of the trees appeared to be of great age. On the next day we
crossed the outlet of the Seneca Lake and moved in three divisions through the woods to encircle
Kanadsega, but found it likewise abandoned. A white child of about three years old, doubtless the
offspring of some unhappy captive, was found here and carried with the army.

A detachment of four hundred men was sent down on the west side of the lake to destroy
Gothseunquean and the plantations in the same quarters; at the same time a number of volunteers
under Colonel Harper, made a forced march towards Cayuga Lake and destroyed Schoyere while the
residue of the army were employed in destroying the corn at Kanadesega of which there was a large
quantity. This town consisted of fifty houses and was pleasantly situated. --- In it we found a great
number of fruit trees which were destroyed with the town. The army then moved on and in two days
arrived at Kanandaque, having been joined on the march by the detachment sent along the Seneca
Lake which had been almost two days employed in destroying the crops and settlements in that quarter.
At Kanadaque we found twenty-three very elegant houses mostly finished and in general large. ---
Here we also found very extensive fields of corn, which having been destroyed, we marched for

Hannayaye, a small town of ten houses, which we also destroyed.

At this place we established a post leaving a strong garrison, our heavy stores and one field piece and
proceeded to Chinesee, which the prisoners informed us was the grand capital of the Indian country,
that Indians of all nations had been planting there this spring; that all the Rangers and some British
had been employed in assisting them in order to raise sufficient supplies to support them while
destroying our frontiers, and that they, themselves, had worked three weeks for the Indians when
planting. This information determined me at all events to reach that settlement, though the state of my
provisions, much reduced by unavoidable accidents, almost forbade the attempt. My flour had been
much reduced by the failure of pack horses and in the passage of creeks and defiles; and twenty-seven
of the cattle had been unavoidably lost. We however marched on for the Chinesee town and on the
second day reached a town of twenty-five houses, called Koneghsaws. Here we found some large corn
fields which part of the army destroyed while the other part were employed in building a bridge over an
unfordable creek between this and Chinisee.

I had the preceding evening ordered out an officer with three or four riflemen, one of our guides and
an Oneida chief to reconnoitre the Chinesee town, that we might, if possible, surprise it. Lieutenant
Boid was the officer entrusted with this service, who took with him twenty-three men, volunteers form
the same corps, and a few from Colonel Butler's regiment, making in all twenty-six, a much larger
number than I had thought of sending, and by no means so likely to answer the purpose as that which
had been directed. The guides were by no means acquainted with the country, mistook the road in the
night, and at daybreak fell in with a castle six miles higher up than Chinesee, inhabited by a tribe called
Squatchegas. Here they saw a few Indians, killed and scalped two, the rest fled. Two runners were
immediately dispatched to me with the account and informed that the party were on their return. When
the bridge was almost completed some of them came in and told us that Lieutenant Boid and men of
his party were almost surrounded by the enemy; that the enemy had been discovering themselves
before him for some miles; that his men had killed two and were eagerly pursuing the rest; but soon
found themselves almost surrounded by three or four hundred Indians and rangers. Those of Mr. Boid's
men who were sent to secure his flanks fortunately made their escape; but he with fourteen of his
party and the Oneida chief being in the centre, were completely encircled. The light troops of the army
and the flanking divisions were immediately detached to their relief; but arrived too late, the enemy
having destroyed the party and escaped.

It appears that our men had taken to a small grove, the ground around it being clear on every side for
several rods, and there fought till Mr. Boid was shot through the body, and his men all killed except
one, who, with his wounded commander was made a prisoner. The firing was so close, before this
brave party were destroyed, that the powder of the enemy's muskets was driven into their flesh. In this
conflict the enemy must have suffered greatly, as they had no cover, and our men were possessed of a
very advantageous one. This advantage of ground the obstinate bravery of the party, with some other
circumstances, induced me to believe their loss must have been very considerable. They were so long
employed in removing and secreting their dead, that the advance of General Hand's party obliged them
to leave one alongside the riflemen, and at least a wagon load of packs, blankets, hats and provisions,
which they had thrown off to enable them to act with more agility in the field. Most of these appeared
to have been appertained to the rangers. Another reason which induces me to suppose they suffered
much was the unparalleled tortures they inflicted upon the brave and unfortunate Boid, whose body,
with that of the equally unfortunate companion, we found at Chinesee. It appeared that they had
whipped them in the most cruel manner, pulled out Mr. Boid's nails, cut off his nose, plucked out one of
his eyes, cut out his tongue, stabbed him with spears in sundry places, and inflicted other tortures
which decency will not permit me to mention; lastly cut off his head, and left his body on the ground
with that of his unfortunate companion, who appeared to have experienced nearly the same savage
barbarity. The party Mr. Boid fell in with, was commanded by Butler, posted on an advantageous piece
of ground, in order to fire upon our army when advancing; but they found their design frustrated by
the appearance of this party in their rear.

The army moved on that day to the castle mentioned, which consisted of twenty-five houses, and had

very extensive fields of corn, which being destroyed, we moved on the next day to Chinesee, crossing
in our route a deep creek and the Little Seneca river; and after marching six miles we reached the
Castle, which consisted of 128 houses, mostly large and elegant. The town was beautifully situated,
almost encircled with a cleared flat, which extended for a number of miles, covered by the most
extensive fields of corn, and every kind of vegetables that can be conceived. The whole army was
immediately engaged in destroying the crops. The corn was collected and burned in houses and kilns,
so the enemy might not reap the least advantage from it, which method we have pursued in every
other place. Here a woman came to us who had been captured at Wioming. She told us the enemy
evacuated the town two days before; that Butler at the same time went off with three or four hundred
Indians and rangers, as he said, to get a shot at our army. This was undoubtedly the party which cut
off Lieutenant Boid. She mentioned they kept runners constantly out, and that when our army was in
motion, the intelligence was communicated by a yell; immediately on which the greatest terror and
confusion apparently took place among them. The women were constantly begging the warriors to sue
for peace, and that on e of the Indians had attempted to shoot Colonel Johnson for the falsehoods by
which he had deceived and ruined them; that she overheard Butler telling Johnson that it was
impossible to keep the Indians together after the Battle of New Town; that he thought they must soon
be in a miserable situation, as all their crops would be destroyed, and that Canada could not supply
them with provisions at Niagara; that he would endeavor to collect the warriors to assist in the defense
of that fort, which he was of opinion this army would lay siege to, and the women and children he
would send into Canada. After having destroyed this town, beyond which I was informed there was no
settlement, and destroyed all their houses and crops in that quarter, the army having been advancing
seventeen days with the supply of provisions before mentioned, and that much reduced on the march
by accidents, and the Cayuga country being as yet unpenetrated, I thought it necessary to return as
soon as possible in order to effect the destruction of the settlements in that quarter. The army
therefore began its march to Kanadasaga.

I was met on the way by a sachem from Oneida and three warriors, one of whom I had sent from
Katherine's with a letter, a copy of which I have the honor to enclose to Congress. They delivered me a
message from the warriors of that nation respecting the Cayugas; copies of that and my answer I also
enclose from this place. I detached Colonel Smith with a party down the west side of the Lake to
destroy the corn which had not been cut down, and to destroy anything further which might be
discovered there. I then detached Colonel Gansevoort with one hundred men to Albany to forward the
baggage of the York regiments to the main army, and then to take with him such soldiers as were at
that place. I directed him to destroy the lower Mohawk castle in his route, and capture the inhabitants,
consisting only of six or seven families who were constantly employed in giving intelligence to the
enemy, and in supporting their scouting parties when making incursions on our frontiers. When the
Mohawks joined the enemy, those few families were undoubtedly left to answer such a purpose and to
keep possession of their lands. The upper castle now inhabited by Orkeskes, our friends he was
directed not to disturb. With him I sent Mr. Deane, who bore my answer to the Oneidas.

I then detached Colonel Butler with six hundred men to destroy the Cayuga country, and with him sent
all the Indian warriors who said if they could find the Cayugas they would endeavor to persuade them
to deliver themselves up as prisoners; the chief of them called Teguttelawana being a near relation to
the Sachem . I then crossed the Seneca river and detached Colonel Dearborn to the west side of the
Cayuga Lake to destroy all the settlements which might be found there and to intercept the Cayugas if
they attempted to escape Colonel Butler. The residue of the army passing on between the lakes,
towards Katherines. Colonel Dearborn burnt in his route six towns, including one which had been
before partly destroyed by a small party; destroying at the same time quantities of corn. He took an
Indian lad and three women prisoners, -- one of the women being very old and the lad a cripple; he left
them, and brought on the other two and joined the army on the evening of the 26th. Colonel Courtland
was then detached with 300 men up the Teaoga branch to search for settlements in that quarter; and
in the space of two days destroyed several fields of corn and burnt several houses. Colonel Butler
joined the army on the 29th day after our leaving Newtown. Here we were met by a plenty of
provisions, from Teaoga, which I had previously directed to be sent on. Colonel Butler destroyed in the

Cayuga country five principle towns and a number of scattering houses, the whole making about one
hundred in number exceedingly large and well built. He also destroyed two hundred acres of excellent
corn with a number of orchards, one of which had in it 1,500 fruit trees. Another Indian settlement was
discovered near Newtown by a party, consisting of 39 houses, which were also destroyed. The number
of towns destroyed by this army amounted to 40 besides scattering houses. The quantity of corn
destroyed, at a moderate computation, must amount to 160,000 bushels, with a vast quantity of
vegetables of every kind. Every creek and river has been traced, and the whole country explored in
search of Indian settlements, and I am well persuaded that, except one town situated near the
Allegana, about 50 miles from Chinesee there is not a single town left in the country of the Five nations.

It is with pleasure I inform Congress that this army has not suffered the loss of forty men in action or
otherwise since my taking the command; though perhaps few troops have experienced a more
fatiguing campaign. Besides the difficulties which naturally attend marching through an enemy's
country, abounding in woods, creeks, rivers, mountains, morasses and defiles, we found no small
inconvenience from the want of proper guides, and the maps of the country are so exceedingly
erroneous that they serve not to enlighten but to perplex. We had not a person who was sufficiently
acquainted with the country to conduct a party out of the Indian path by day, or scarcely in it by night;
though they were the best I could possibly procure. Their ignorance, doubtless arose from the Indians
having ever taken the best measures in their power to prevent their country's being explored. We had
much labor in clearing out the roads for the artillery, notwithstanding which, the army moved from
twelve to sixteen miles every day when not detained by rains, or employed in destroying settlements.

I feel myself much indebted to the officers of every rank for their unparalleled exertions, and to the
soldiers for the unshaken firmness with which they endured the toils and difficulties attending the
expedition. Though I had it not in command I should have ventured to have paid Niagara a visit, had I
been supplied with fifteen days provisions in addition to what I had, which I am persuaded from the
bravery and ardor of our troops would have fallen into our hands.

I forgot to mention that the Oneida Sachem requested me to grant his people liberty to hunt in the
country of the Five Nations, as they would never think of settling again in a country once subdues, and
where their settlements must ever be in our power. I, in answer, informed him that I had no authority
to grant such a license; that I could not at present see reason to object to it, but advised them to make
application to Congress, who, I believed, would, in consideration of their friendly conduct grant them
every advantage of this kind that would not interfere with our settlement of the country, which I
believed would soon take place. The Oneidas say that as no Indians were discovered by Colonel Butler
at Cayuga, they are of the opinion they are gone to their castle, and that their Chiefs will persuade
them to come in and surrender themselves on the terms I have proposed. The army began its march
from Conowalohala yesterday, and arrived here this evening. After leaving the necessary force for
securing the frontiers in this quarter, I shall move on to join the main army.

It would have been very pleasing to this army to have drawn the enemy to a second engagement, but
such a panic seized them after the first action that it was impossible, as they never ventured
themselves in reach of the army, nor have they fired a single gun at it on its march or in its quarters,
though in a country exceedingly well calculated for ambuscades. This circumstance alone would
sufficiently prove that they suffered severely in their first effort.

Congress will please pardon the length of this narration, as I thought a particular and circumstantial
detail of facts would not be disagreeable, especially as I have transmitted no accounts of the progress
of this army since the action of the 29th of August. I flatter myself that the orders with which I was
entrusted are fully executed, as we have not left a single settlement or field of corn in the country of
the Five Nations, nor is there even the appearance of an Indian on this side of Niagara. Messengers
and small parties have been constantly passing, and some imprudent soldiers who straggled from the
army, mistook the route and went back almost to Chinesee without discovering even the track of an
Indian. I trust the steps I have taken with respect to the Oneidas, Cayugas and Mohawks will prove
satisfactory; and here I beg leave to mention that in searching the houses of those pretended neutral

Cayugas, a number of scalps were found, which appeared to have been lately taken, which Colonel
Butler showed to the Oneidas, who said that they were then convinced of the justice of the steps I had
taken. The promise made to the soldiers in my address at Newtown I hope will be thought reasonable
by Congress, and flatter myself that the performance of it will be ordered.

Colonel Bruin will have the honor of delivering these dispatches to your Excellency. I beg leave to
recommend him to the particular notice of Congress, as an officer who, on this as well as several other
campaigns, has proved himself an active, brave, and truly deserving officer.

I have the honor to be, with the most exalted elements of esteem and respect, your Excellency's most
obedient and ever humble servant,

JOHN SULLIVAN.

His Excellency John Jay, Esq.

Published by order of Congress.

Charles Thompson, Secretary
__________________________________________

Taken from http://www.twintiershistory.com/ -

MAJ. GEN. JOHN SULLIVAN

The command of this expedition was first offered to General Gates, who refused with the comment, "
The man who undertakes the Indian Service should enjoy youth and strength, requisites I do not
possess." Gen. Washington then named Maj. Gen. John Sullivan to the command.

In his instructions to General Sullivan, Washington said, "Lay waste all the settlements around, so that
the country may not only be overrun, but destroyed."

The plan of action called for General Sullivan, with the main army of about 3500 men, to march from
Easton, PA. across the Pocono Plateau to Wyoming and then follow the Susquehanna River Valley
northward to Tioga Point.

General Clinton with about 1600 men from the Mohawk Valley was to proceed to Otsego Lake and then
descend the north branch of the Susquehanna to Tioga Point where he would join the main army. He
was to be met along the way by Lt. Colonel Pawling with 200 men from the Hudson Valley.

The combined force was then to proceed to the Genesee Valley region of New York where they would
be joined by Col. Daniel Brodhead with 650 men from Fort Pitt, Pa. The entire force was then to
proceed westward to attack and capture the British Fort Niagara

THE AFTERMATH OF THE BATTLE OF NEWTOWN!

<http://thetwintiers.com/generalsullivan/newtownmarkerb.jpg&g...;

MARKER DESCRIBING THE BATTLE OF NEWTOWN

After burying the dead and sending the wounded back to Ft. Sullivan at Tioga Point, the army moved
northward and began a systematic destruction of the Indian towns and fields in its path.

Gen. Sullivan decided not to go on to attack Ft. Niagara as originally planned. It was late in the season
and his men were not equipped for the colder weather which would start soon, the expedition under
Colonel Broadhead had not met them as planned, and Sullivan did not feel that his tired , poorly
equipped army could successfully storm the heavily fortified and well armed Ft. Niagara. He felt that it
was important to return his army intact to General Washington for further use in the course of the war.

Accordingly, General Sullivan issued an order wherein he said:

?The Commander-in-chief informs his brave and resolute army that the immediate objects of this
expedition are accomplished, viz: total ruin of the Indian settlements and the destruction of their crops,

which were designed for the support of those inhuman barbarians, while they were desolating the
American frontiers. He is by no means insensible to the obligations he i sunder to those brave officers
and soldiers whose virtue and fortitude have enabled him to complete the important design of the
expedition, and he assures them he will not fail to inform America at large how much they stand
indebted to them. The army will this day will commence its march for Tioga.?

After the war ended, many of the soldiers from the campaign were attracted back to the scenic fertile
lands of which they once laid waste. By most accounts they lived carved out good lives for themselves
and their families and are forever laid to rest in the region once known as the mysterious Indian
frontier.

<http://thetwintiers.com/generalsullivan/cemetaryb.jpg>;
SIGN IN ELMIRA, NY MARKING THE RESTING SPOT FOR THOSE WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE
SULLIVAN INDIAN EXPEDITION AND WHO LATER RETURNED TO THE AREA FOR SETTLEMENT

SIX RESULTS OF THE SULLIVAN EXPEDITION

1. The Six Nations were so crushed that the Iroquois never again made war as a confederacy.

2.The confidence of the Indians in his British allies was definitely shaken.

3. An impending British attack from Ft. Niagara was thwarted.

4. The food supply of the British was cut off, and in addition, they were forced to feed the destitute
Indians who fled to Ft. Niagara to escape Sullivan?s army.

5. The success of the expedition gave the war new vigor on all fronts.

6. It won for the colonies a great western territory which was to place them in a good position when
later the war ended and peace terms and lands were discussed.
___________________________________________________
Taken from: http://www.seacoastnh.com/blackhistory/patriots.html -

Notes on "Colored Patriots"
America's first black historian, William C. Nell (1816-74) included a short chapter on NH patriots in his
landmark book on African-Americans in the Revolution. Nell mentions Jude Hall of Exeter and "Aunt
Jenny" who he refers to as NH's last slave. Nell's history is the key source of information about
Portsmouth's Prince Whipple, slave to William Whipple , a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Prince is mentioned, not in the short NH chapter reprinted here, but in the chapter on the state of
Delaware. Nell places Prince there because he was reportedly in attendance to Gen. George
Washington during his famous crossing of the Delaware River. In the NH chapter, Nell recounts an
anecdote about a slave to Durham's General Sullivan that others, including 19th century journalist
Charles Brewster of Portsmouth, attribute to Prince Whipple. JDR

William Cooper Nell
(1816-74)

Best known today for his collected biographies of African-American patriots, abolitionist William C. Nell
deserves much attention for his lifelong struggle for civil rights. Although he studied law, Nell refused
to apply to the bar because he would not take an oath to a Constitution that did not recognize the
rights of slaves. A native of Boston, Massachusetts, Nell campaigned to abolish separate schools for
black children.

In 1851 he became assistant to Frederick Douglass and soon after published his own pamphlet on "
Colored American Patriots" in the Revolution and the War of 1812. This evolved into the book for which
he is best known and is excerpted here. Nell drew his stories from personal accounts, cemetery records
and research. His book includes an introduction by abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe. She writes that
reading Nell's book might "give new meaning and self-respect to the race here represented."

Some credit Nell with saving many black soldiers from obscurity. In his introduction, Nell hopes he can "

rescue from oblivion" the heroic stories of his race. His account of the first martyr to the Revolution,
Chrispus Attucks, brought a key black figure into American history at a time when almost all African-
Americans were excluded. Nell's attempt to have a monument erected to Attucks was unsuccessful in
1851.

Nell is credited as the first African-American to publish a significant collection of black biographies,
though he was not a professional historian. A native free person, Nell wrote in what is described as the "
naturalist idiom" popular in his time period and his focus was on soldiers and patriots. His work has, at
times, been criticized as more enthusiastic than scholarly. William Nell is also distinguished as the first
black American to hold a federal civilian post. He worked as a US postal clerk from 1861 until his death
in 1874.

© 1997 SeacoastNH.com

"Colored Patriots"
of New Hampshire
By W.C. Nell, 1855

JUDE HALL was born at Exeter, N. H., and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, under General Poor.
He served faithfully eight years, and fought in most all the battles, beginning at Bunker Hill. He was
called a great soldier, and was known in New Hampshire to the day of his death by the name of "Old
Rock."

Singular to relate, three of his sons have been kidnapped at different times, and reduced to slavery.
James was put on board a New Orleans vessel; Aaron was stolen from Providence, in 1807; William
went to sea in the bark Hannibal, from Newburyport, and was sold in the West Indies, from whence he
escaped after ten years of slavery, and sailed as captain of a collier from Newcastle to London.

The anecdote of the slave of Gen. Sullivan, of New Hampshire, is well known. When his master told him
that they were on the point of starting for the army, to fight for liberty, he shrewdly suggested, that it
would be a great satisfaction to know that he was indeed going to fight for his liberty. Struck with the
reasonableness and justice of this suggestion, Gen. S. at once gave him his freedom.

It is not very surprising, that in the time of the Revolutionary War, when so much was said of freedom,
equality, and the rights of man, the poor African should think that he had some rights, and should seek
that freedom which others valued so highly. There were slaves then, even in New Hampshire, and their
owners, like the Egyptians of old, and the Carolinians now, were unwilling to let them go." Here is an
extract from the Journal of New Hampshire, touching this matter, showing how justice and humanity
were postponed, as repentance often is, to a more convenient opportunity:-

"JUNE 9, 1780. Agreeable to order of the day, the petition of Negro Brewster and others, negro slaves,
praying to be set free from slavery, being read, considered, and argued by counsel for petitioners
before this House, it appears that at this time this house is not ripe for a determination in this matter.
Therefore, ordered, That the further consideration of the matter be postponed till a more convenient
opportunity."

Senator Morrill, of New Hampshire, in his speech at Washington, in 1820, on the Missouri question,
alluded to a colored man in his own State, by the name of Cheswell, who, with his family, were
respectable in point of property, ability, and character. He held some of the first offices of the town in
which he resided, was appointed Justice of the Peace for the county, and was perfectly competent to
perform all the duties of his various offices in the most prompt, accurate, and acceptable manner.

"In New Hampshire," says Dr. Belknap, in 1795, " those blacks who enlisted into the army for three
years, were entitled to the same bounty as the whites. This bounty their masters received as the price
of their liberty, and then delivered up their bills of sale, and gave them a certificate of manumission.
Several of these bills and certificates were deposited in my hands; and those who survived the three
years service were free." *



New Hampshire papers of a quite recent date record the death, at Hanover, of Mrs. JANE E.
WENTWORTH a colored woman, at the age of three score and ten. Graduates at Dartmouth will
recollect her as Aunt Jenny, the wash-woman, and nurse in sickness. Her parents were slaves,
kidnapped when very young, and came by inheritance in possession of the family of Mrs. House, of
Hanover. They were subsequently sold to a gentleman in Salem, NH, where they remained until they
were emancipated by the laws of the State. Jenny was born in Hanover, in 1777, was sold with her
parents, and upon becoming free, she married Charles Wentworth, a slave of Gov. Wentworth. They
then removed to Hanover, where they remained till their death. Jenny outlived her husband several
years, and was one of the last of the African race who in our early history were held in bondage in New
England.

* Massachusetts Historical Collection, Vol. IV., p. 203.

© 1997 SeacoastNH.com
__________________________________

Taken from http://www.seacoastnh.com/history/rev/willmary.html -

December 14, 1774

[William and Mary Raid] NEWS TRAVELED SLOWLY in Colonial New England, but even though it was
spread by word of mouth, by letter and by well worn newspapers, it traveled in exorably. Residents of
Portsmouth were, after the passage of some weeks, as disgruntled as those of Boston over the actions
of Parliament. By the middle of December 1773, they were excited over reports of the Boston Tea Party
and were looking toward 1774 with apprehension.

Nevertheless, the first cargo of tea destined to bear the hated tax was unloaded at Portsmouth without
incident 'and locked in the customs house. A special town meeting was called which requested, in the
interests of the peace, that the chests be reshipped to Halifax. Although this was done, Governor
Wentworth kept officers and magistrates on alert to suppress possible violence. A second cargo was
also rerouted to Nova Scotia, but the merchant who had ordered it felt the consequences of a growing
revolutionary spirit. The windows of his house were smashed by a mob.

Tea Troubles

By May of 1774 the news on every one's lips was the closure of the port of Boston. The Crown
expected the "salt-water tea" to be paid for and the citizens of Boston to show some evidence of
general remorse. The New Hampshire Committee of Correspondence, in a note which revealed its own
stand on this paramount issue of the day, swore, ". . . ever (to) view your interests as our own."
Obviously, Bostonians could count on support from New Hampshire.

Governor Wentworth was aware of a radical shift both in public opinion and in the makeup of the
provincial assembly, and attempted to garrison Portsmouth's only military post, Fort William and Mary
in New Castle. In May, 1774 the assembly voted to grant him 200 pounds for that purpose. No doubt
he felt this grossly inadequate, but an officer and three men were appointed to administer the fort in
the king's name-a less than formidable army with which to stave off revolution.

The Assembly, which did not appear intimidated by either the "army" at the fort or the governor's ire,
voted later in the same month to establish a second Committee of Correspondence. The assemblymen
were not dissuaded from their purpose by frequent adjournments and "cooling off" periods forced upon
them by Wentworth and the Rockingham County sheriff. Dismissed from the assembly chamber for
holding an illegal meeting, they retired to a local tavern and in that congenial atmosphere made plans
for a Provincial Congress to be held at Exeter in July.

Aid To Boston

The Exeter meeting, unfettered by the trammels of royal intervention, recommended that New
Hampshire towns, on their own, send some sort of material aid to the poor of Boston. This aid, which
issued rapidly from the surrounding towns in bags, barrels, coffers, and on the hoof, also included

letters of moral support. The meeting in Exeter provided proof, however seminal, that representative
government in New Hampshire was peacefully changing hands.

By December, 1774, news of additional parliamentary misdeeds had reached Portsmouth both by
messenger and through the New Hampshire Gazette, which told of the passage of the Massachusetts
Government Act the Quartering Act and the Quebec Act. It was said that the king had imposed a secret
embargo on the export of arms and ammunition to his colonies. Moreover, patriots in Rhode Island had
already seized powder and shot from the royal garrison in Providence. What about Portsmouth? Would
there be troops and ships coming from Boston to keep the same thing from happening there?

The answer came on the afternoon of December 13, 1774, when Paul Revere galloped up the Old
Boston Post Road into the city to deliver confirmation of the rumors. Yes, it was thought that troops
and ships were on their way, and yes, if the' powder stored at William and Mary were not to remain in
the king's hands, something had better be done about it.

The Raid Begins

The way seemed appallingly clear. A few minutes before noon on December 14, a drummer, his beats
muffled by the falling snow, marched through the streets of the city sounding the call that everyone
recognized. Before long, he had collected an entourage of more than two hundred men and boys.

At the fort, guarding the king's powder, were the defenders-Capt. Cochran and five men. At about one
o'clock, this tiny garrison received word that an angry mob was on its way from town, growing larger
as citizens from Rye and New Castle hastened to join. By the time they reached the gates of the fort,
the attackers numbered more than 400.

At about three o'clock in the afternoon a few shots were exchanged, but no one was injured. Before a
second volley could be fired, the fort was overwhelmed, and Cochran's band was in the hands of the
attackers. Three huzzas were shouted and the king's colors were lowered.

Cochran, though overwhelmed, showed no signs of allowing the keys to the powder magazine to leave
his possession. Substituting shoulders for keys, the attackers broke down the door and were able to
make off with 97 barrels of powder which they loaded onto moses boats and gundalows for dispersal to
the various surrounding towns. The captain of the defenders wrote in his note to Governor Wentworth, "
I did all in my power to defend the fort, but all my efforts could not avail against so great a number."
With odds of four hundred to six, neither the governor nor posterity could fault him.

Governor Wentworth, caught in an impossible situation, hastily requested ships and troops from Boston.
Obviously, he had need of help, for the next morning men from the surrounding countryside began to
pour into the city, lured by rumors of the previous day's events. John Sullivan of Durham and his men
surrounded the state house and demanded information about possible reinforcements. "None were
expected," said Wentworth. The mob dispersed, only to reassemble later that evening to remove
remaining military stores from the fort. Again the trophies were loaded at the river.

The powder was soon distributed. Kingston received 12 barrels, Epping 8, Poplin (Fremont) 4,
Nottingham 8, Brentwood 6, and Londonderry 1. Remaining stores were distributed in Durham, which
received 25 barrels, and in Exeter, where 29 barrels were retained. Four barrels remained in
Portsmouth. The precious dust was destined for the powder flasks of the local militia units, the building
blocks of the nascent continental army. The powder and the power no longer belonged to King George
III, it was in the hands of the people. In New Hampshire, at least, the Revolution had begun.

By Anne and Charles Eastman, Jr.

Originally published in "NH: Years of Revolution," Profiles Publications and the NH Bicentennial
Commision, 1976. Reprinted by permission of the authors.
__________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.state.nh.us/nhdhr/glikeness/sulljohn.html -



A Guide to Likenesses of
New Hampshire Officials and Governors
on Public Display at
the Legislative Office Building and the State House
Concord, New Hampshire, to 1998

John Sullivan (1740-1795)

[Portrait of John Sullivan] Sullivan (1740 - 1795) was born at Somersworth (NH). He read law at
Posrtsmouth (NH), with Hon. Samuel Livermore, married (Lydia Worcester) in 1760, and practiced law
at Berwick (ME) until 1763. He and his wife subsequently moved to Durham (NH).

Sullivan was commissioned a major in the New Hampshire militia (1772), and in 1774 he went as a
delegate to the First Continental Congress, meeting at Philadelphia (PA). During the American
Revolution Sullivan rose to the rank of General while compiling a distinguished war record. He resigned
from military service November 30, 1779, at the conclusion of a long and successful campaign to
defeat the Iroquois Nation and their British Loyalist allies, because of poor health.

Sullivan returned to Philadelphia, where Congress was meeting in 1780 - 81, only to be met with
charges of accepting bribes. Sullivan survived an inquiry, then returned to New Hampshire. There he
was a member of the 1782 Constitutional Convention. He served as New Hampshire Attorney General
(1782 - 86) and as Speaker of the House (1785). In 1786 Sullivan was elected President of the state;
he put down riots against the issuing of paper money and was reelected in 1787. A year later (1788)
Sullivan was Chairman of the state convention which ratified the Constitution of the United States, and
he was reelected Speaker of the House. In 1789 Sullivan was again elected President of New
Hampshire, while also being appointed U. S. District Judge of New Hampshire. He held this judgeship
until his death in 1795. Sullivan is interred in the family plot at Durham (NH).

Location: State House, Second Floor, Executive Council Chambers
_____________________________________

Taken from --- http://www.seacoastnh.com/brewster/27.html

By Charles W. Brewster

Editors Note: C.W. Brewster was a Portsmouth columnist in the mid-1800's. This article includes his
opinions and may not reflect current research or current values.
JDR

John Sullivan-The house boy--His first law case--His advancement--His sail on the Piscataqua.

Read more about John Sullivan

HAVING given a hasty sketch of the history of the Livermore mansion, we will go back a few years to
take a more familiar view of the old occupants.

It was not far from the year 1758, that a lad of seventeen years, with a rough dress, might have been
seen knocking at the door of this house, and asking for the Squire, who listens to his application, and
inquires: "And what can you do, my lad, if I take you?" "Oh, I can split the wood, take care of the
horse, attend to the gardening, and perhaps find some spare time to read a little, if you can give me
the privilege."

John Sullivan, for that was the name he gave, appeared to be a promising lad, and so he was received
into Mr. Livermore's kitchen, and was entrusted with various matters relating to the work of the house
and the stable. Mr. L., finding him intelligent, encouraged his desire to read by furnishing from his
library any books he wished; and with this privilege he improved every leisure moment. Libraries then
were not so extensive as now, but the position of Mr. L. gave him a very good one for the times, and
among them the most choice legal works of the day. John was permitted at times to take a seat in the

library room, and he had the care of it in Mr. Livermore's absence.

One evening there had been some trouble in the town, which resulted in a fight. As has been the
custom in later days, so then the party which fared the worse prosecuted the other for assault and
battery. The case was to be brought before Deacon Penhallow (at his house on the south-east corner
of Pleasant and Court streets). The best legal talents were needed for the defence, to save the culprit
from the stinging disgrace of being placed in the stocks--in those formidable pieces of timber which
were standing for years near the south-east corner of the old North church. The defendant at once
resorted to the office of Mr. Livermore. He was absent, and John was reading in the library alone. The
man, supposing that any one from an office so celebrated might answer his purpose, asked John if he
would not undertake his case. John, on the whole, concluded to go, and, leaving word in the kitchen
that he should be absent awhile, trudged off with his client. He soon learnt the merits of the case, and
having given some attention to the law books, and acquired some knowledge of the forms of trial, he
had confidence that he might gain the case. The charges were made; the blackened eyes and bruises
were shown, and the case looked very doubtful for John's client.

While this trial was going on, Mr. Livermore returned from his journey; and on inquiring for John to
take care of the horse, was told that he had gone off to Deacon Penhallow's to a court. Mr. L.'s
curiosity was excited. He put the horse in the stable, and, without awaiting his supper, slipped into a
room adjoining the court, and, without being seen by the parties, listened to the trial. John had just
commenced his argument, which was managed with good tact, and exhibited native talent and as
much knowledge of law as some regular practitioners. John was successful, his client was acquitted,
and John received here his first court fee.

Mr. L. returned as obscurely as he entered. The next morning the young man was called into the library
room, and thus addressed: "John, my kitchen is no place for you; follow on in your studies, give them
your undivided attention, and you shall have what assistance you need from me until you are in
condition to repay it."

The result is well-known. John Sullivan became eminent at the bar, became conspicuous as General in
the war of the Revolution, and, after the peace, was for three years President of New Hampshire. He
was afterwards District Judge. He died at Durham in 1795, at the age of fifty-four.

Gen. Sullivan was of Irish descent. His father was born in Limerick in 1692, came to Berwick, Me., as
early as the year 1723, and died in 1796, aged one hundred and four years. His mother came over
several years after, from Cork. She was born in 1714, and died in 1801, aged eighty-seven. Her mind
was of a rough though noble cast. The father's education was good, and together they enjoyed
honorable poverty in early life. When on her passage to this country, a fellow passenger jocosely said
to her: What do you expect to do by going over to America? Do, said she, why raise Governors for
them. Little did she then think that of two of her boys then unborn, John would become President of
New Hampshire and James the Governor of Massachusetts.

James, in his minority, was engaged in gondolaing on our river, and it was when following this business
that he broke both of his legs, the effects of which were ever after visible in his gait.

John Sullivan, in early life, was doubtless familiar with the navigation of the Piscataqua. Later in life,
after the Revolution, when the General's commission had given place to that of President of New
Hampshire, his Excellency, being a resident of Durham, one day saw a boat bound to Portsmouth. He
asked for a passage, which was readily granted, one of the boatmen proposing the condition that the
President should observe the usual custom of paying his respects to the "Pulpit,"--a name given to
some stones projecting from the river, which the superstitious boatmen regarded as subjecting to bad
luck if passed without raising the hat. The General said he never did nor never should pay respect to
the devil's pulpit, and therefore they need not ask it of him. There was danger of bad luck to the
boatmen. They however sailed and rowed on down the river. At length one of the boatmen raised his
own hat, and casting his eyes up to the tri-colored hat with waving plume which decorated the head of
his Excellency, in apparent wonder said, "sir, the birds seem to have flown over your hat?" His hand

was speedily raised and the hat carefully brought down for inspection." I see nothing," said he. "We've
passed the Pulpit, sir," was the laconic reply. The superstitious boatmen were in good cheer; they had
brought the President down and good luck rested on the voyage of that day.

The success of the Sullivans under great difficulties should give encouragement for perseverance to all
young men. There is certainly a memento connected with Livermore street history which should never
be forgotten.

Text scanned courtesy of The Brewster Family Network
Copy of Rambles courtesy Peter E. Randall
History Hypertext project by SeacoastNH.com
Design © 1999 SeacoastNH.com
_________________________________________

Taken from http://www.bartleby.com/65/su/SullvnJ.html -

Sullivan, John

1740?95, American Revolutionary general, b. Somersworth, N.H. He was a lawyer and a delegate
(1774?75, 1780?81) to the Continental Congress but is better remembered as a military leader. He
served at the siege of Boston, and in 1776, while fighting under George Washington at the battle of
Long Island, he was captured by the British. He was exchanged in time to fight at Trenton and
Princeton and later at Brandywine and Germantown. In 1778 he was sent to cooperate with the French
fleet in an attack on Newport. The fleet was forced to withdraw, however, and the attack had to be
given up. The next year, with Gen. James Clinton , he conducted a retaliatory campaign against the
Iroquois and Loyalists on the New York frontier. The Native Americans and Loyalists were defeated in
the battle of Newtown (near Elmira), and much of the Iroquois country was laid waste. Sullivan was
later elected chief executive (1786, 1787, 1789) of New Hampshire. He also helped to put down
Shays?s Rebellion and was influential in getting the Constitution ratified. 1
See biographies by T. C. Amory (1868, repr. 1968) and C. P. Whittemore (1961).
________________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.seacoastnh.com/framers/sullivan.html -

JOHN SULLIVAN was one of the best known New Hampshire figures in the Revolution, but he was also
one of the most controversial.

Sullivan was born in the parish of Somersworth on February 17, 1740, the third son of Irish
redemptioner immigrants. His father was the local schoolmaster and he made sure his son received a
good education. Sullivan read the law with Samuel Livermore, and in 1764 he bought three acres on
the bank of the Oyster River in Durham and hung out his shingle there, becoming the town's first
lawyer.

Extremely controversial in his day, Somersworth?s John Sullivan became the first "president" of New
Hampshire. He served three terms in the role we now call governor. Sullivan cut his teeth as a young
lawyer in Portsmouth, NH and became the first attorney in Durham. His goal in life was to be wealthy
and his litigious pursuit of debtors in his hometown led to angry mobs surrounding his house. He
served courageously, some say brazenly, in Revolutionary War battles, though he had been a friend of
exiled British NH governor John Wentworth, whom he later replaced. Captured by the British, Sullivan
became a courier between the two sides for which he was severely criticized. Sullivan joined the
Seacoast NH uprising at Fort William and Mary in 1774, then served in a number of failed battles.
George Washington was not fond of Sullivan, but called on him often. Major General Sullivan was
among the troops at Quebec, and a leader at Trenton, Brandywine and Germantown. Washington
called on him again in 1779 to literally wipe out all Native American settlements that threatened
colonists in New York and Pennsylvania. Sullivan?s March, as it was called, devastated Indian
populations there as his troops destroyed all native housing and crops. He served in both the first and
second Continental Congress. After the war he returned to his law practice and was made a federal

judge, though he was often too ill, often from alcohol, to serve. The NH town and county of Sullivan
are among the many places dedicated in his name.
_________________________________________

Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

John SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Feb 1740
Berwick, York, Maine
Parents:
Relatives:
Walter S. Sullivan
Source Information:
Film Number: 178011
Page Number: 919
Reference Number: 29925
___________________________

Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

John SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Feb 1740
Berwick, York, Maine
Parents:
Relatives:
Walter Scott SULLIVAN
Source Information:
Film Number: 177901
Page Number: 327
Reference Number: 12641
___________________________

Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

John SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Feb 1740
Berwick, York, Maine
Parents:
Relatives:
Walter S. SULLIVAN
Source Information:
Film Number: 177898
Page Number: 672
Reference Number: 26566
___________________________

Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

John SULLIVAN
Sex: M

Event(s):
Birth: 17 Sep 1740
Somersworth, Strafford, New Hampshire
Parents:
Source Information:
Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
8909503 - 1553359 Film
Sheet: 38
___________________________

Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

JOHN SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Feb 1740
Somersworth, Strafford, New Hampshire
Parents:
Source Information:
Film Number: 1760804
Page Number:
Reference Number:
_______________________

Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

JOHN SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Feb 1740
Somerset, New Hampshire
Parents:
Father: JOHN SULLIVAN
Mother: MARGARET BROWNE
Source Information:
Film Number: 1760939
Page Number:
Reference Number:
_______________________________

Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

JOHN SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Feb 1740
Somerset, New Hampshire
Parents:
Father: JOHN SULLIVAN
Mother: MARGARET BROWNE
Source Information:
Film Number: 1760890
Page Number:
Reference Number:
______________________________



Taken from IGI on ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

John <SULLIVAN>
Sex: U
Event(s):
Birth: 17 Feb 1740
Of, Berwick, York, Maine
Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN
Mother: Margery BROWNE SULLIVAN
Source Information:
Film Number: 178100
Page Number: 725
Reference Number: 25212
_________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 15, 2002 -

THE SCOTCH-IRISH OR THE SCOT IN NORTH BRITAIN, NORTH IRELAND, AND NORTH AMERICA
CHAPTER I THE SCOTCH-IRISH AND THE REVOLUTION
page 24
[p.24] It would appear from the figures given in the preceding pages that the New England element in
the American Army, subsequent to the withdrawal of the British from New England territory, was under
forty per cent of the whole native force, or but little more than proportionate to its relative population.
In like manner, it appears that the leaders of the army were no less representative of its true
constitution than the rank and file. Of Washington's twelve generals at the beginning of the war,
Nathanael Greene, William Heath, Seth Pomeroy, Israel Putnam, Joseph Spencer, John Sullivan, John
Thomas, Artemas Ward, and David Wooster were New England men?Charles Lee of Virginia, and
Richard Montgomery and Philip Schuyler of New York completing the staff. But the majority of the New
Englanders dropped out of sight before the conflict was fairly begun; and besides Greene, the only
general officers from that section who achieved renown during the progress of the war were the Scotch-
Irishmen, Henry Knox and John Stark, and the Irishman, John Sullivan . The New England general in
command of the forces on Long Island seems to have been relegated mainly to garrison duty after the
retreat from that place, and Benjamin Lincoln's campaign in the South resulted most disastrously.
When the army was discharged in 1783, we find that among the fifteen major-generals, New England
was represented by five?Greene, Heath, Putnam, Lincoln, and Knox. Of the remainder, there were, of
Scottish descent, besides Knox: William Alexander (N. J.), Alexander McDougall (N. Y.), Arthur St. Clair
(Pa.); of English descent, in addition to the four first named: Horatio Gates (Va.), Robert Howe (N. C.),
William Smallwood (Md.), and William Moultrie (?) (S. C.); of French birth: Lafayette and Du Portail;
and of German: Steuben. Of the twenty-two brigadiers at that time?six from New England?there were
of Scottish blood: William Irvine (Pa.), Lachlan McIntosh (Ga.), John Paterson (Mass.), Charles Scott
(Va.), John Stark (N. H.); of Anglo-Scottish: George Clinton (N. Y.), James Clinton (N. Y.), Edward
Hand (Pa.), Anthony Wayne (Pa.); of French: Isaac Huger (S. C.); of German: Johann De Kalb (France),
Peter Muhlenberg (Va.); of Welsh: Daniel Morgan (Va.), O. H. Williams (Md.); and of English: Elias
Dayton (N. J.), Mordecai Gist (Md.), John Greaton (Mass.), Moses Hazen (Mass.), Jedediah Huntington
(Conn.), Rufus Putnam (Mass.), Jethro Sumner (?) (S. C.), George Weedon (Va.). Out of the thirty-
seven names on these two lists of 1783, eleven were from New England; and of the total list about one
half were of English descent, while two fifths were to a large degree Celtic in their descent.
__________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 15, 2002 -

American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II

Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
S
Fifteenth Virginia
page 527
Sullivan, John (N. H.). Brigadier-General Continental Army, 22d June, 1775; Major-General, 9th August,
1776; taken prisoner at Long Island, 27th August, 1776; exchanged December, 1776. By the Act of 9th
September, 1778, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan ,
and to the officers and troops of his command, for their fortitude and bravery displayed in the action of
August 29th (Quaker Hill), in which they repulsed the British forces and maintained the field." By the
act of 14th October, 1779, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General
Sullivan and the brave officers and soldiers under his command, for effectually executing an important
expedition against such of the Indian nations as, encouraged by the councils of his Britannic majesty,
had perfidiously waged an unprovoked and cruel war against these United States, laid waste many of
their defenseless towns, and with savage barbarity slaughtered the inhabitants thereof." Resigned 30th
November, 1779. (Died 23d January, 1795.)
_____________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 15, 2002 -

Herringshaw's Encyclopedia of American Biography of the Nineteenth Century.
Herringshaw's Encyclopedia of American Biography
page 905
SULLIVAN, JOHN , soldier, lawyer, jurist, congressman, was born Feb. 17, 1740, in Brunswick, Maine.
He attained the rank of major-general in the revolutionary army. He was a delegate from New
Hampshire to the continental congress in 1774 and 1775, and again in 1780 and 1781. He was for
three years president of New Hampshire. In 1789 he was appointed a judge of the district court, which
office he held until his death. He died Jan. 23, 1795, in Durham, N.H.
___________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 15, 2002 -

Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
Biographies
S
page 1882
SULLIVAN, John (brother of James Sullivan and father of George Sullivan ), a Delegate from New
Hampshire; born in Somersworth, N.H., February 17, 1740; received a limited education; studied law;
was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Durham in 1760; took an active part in pre-
Revolutionary movements; Member of the Continental Congress in 1774 and 1775; during the
Revolution was appointed as a brigadier general; later promoted to major general, and from June 1775
until early in 1780 was an active participant in many major engagements and received the thanks of
Washington and the approbation of Congress; resigned on account of ill health; again a Member of the
Continental Congress in 1780 and 1781; attorney general of New Hampshire 1782-1786; President of
New Hampshire in 1786 and 1787; member of the convention that ratified [p.1882] the Federal
Constitution; speaker of the State house of representatives; presidential elector in 1789; again chosen
President of New Hampshire; appointed by President Washington judge of the United States District
Court of New Hampshire in September 1789 and held that office until his death in Durham, N.H.,
January 23, 1795; interment in the Sullivan family cemetery.
____________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 15, 2002 -

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume X
S
Sullivan, Will Van Amberg


SULLIVAN, John, soldier, was born in Berwick, Maine, Feb. 17, 1740; son of Owen Sullivan , 1691-1796,
who immigrated to America in 1723. He became a well-known lawyer in Durham, N.H.; was active in
pre-Revolutionary matters; was major of state militia; a delegate to the Continental congress, May,
1774; was commissioned brigadier-general in the Continental army in June, 1775, and with Gen.
Nathanael Greene, commanded the left wing under Gen. Charles Lee, in the siege of Boston. Upon the
evacuation of Boston, he commanded the northern army on the Canadian borders and attacked the
British at Three Rivers, but was defeated and joined Washington at New York. He was promoted major-
general, and commanded the troops on Long Island, but relinquished his command to Gen. Benjamin
Lincoln. He took part in the battles of Long Island; Westchester; commanded the right wing under
General Washington, during the passage of the Delaware river and the subsequent capture of the
Hessians at Trenton. He commanded a night expedition on Staten Island, and took about 100 prisoners;
commanded the right wing at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown, Pa., and in 1778 was
detailed by General Washington, to co-operate with the French fleet under D'Estaing against Newport,
R.I. On Aug. 29, 1778, he fought the battle of Butt's Hill, driving the British and Hessians from the field
at the bayonet's point. He led an expedition against the Iroquois Indians and the English, in Northern
New York, burning their villages and devastating their lands. On his return to Philadelphia, he resigned
his commission and was again a delegate to the Continental congress in 1780. He resumed his law
practice in New Hampshire; was president of the state, 1786-89; a member of the state constitutional
convention in 1784; councillor in 1787, and was active in securing the adoption by the state of the U.S.
constitution. He was U.S. judge of New Hampshire, 1789-95. The honorary degree of LL.D. was
conferred on him by Harvard in 1780. The state government ordered the preparation of his Journals of
the Military Expeditions against the Six Nations in 1779, with records of Centennial Celebrations (1887).
He died in Durham, N.H., Jan. 23, 1795.
View full context
____________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I33997
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1795
* Occupation: Schoolmaster
* Burial: 1731 left Ireland and came to Berwick, Maine.
* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

His son John was rather famous. "Born in Limerick in 1690, Master Sullivan apparently was christened
Owen, retaining that name until after he came to America. Evidently he benefitted from a good
education, perhaps received on the continent, for he spoke French and reportedly was a linguist of
some talent. Why he came to America remains somewhat obscure, although there is reason to believe
that he argued with his mother, who opposed his marrying beneath his station.

Master Sullivan, though loath to work with his hands, soon fulfilled his obligations as a redemptioner;
tradition says he persuaded a clergyman to buy his freedom for him. He soon married Margery Brown
(Browne), who had been born in Cork in 1714. They settled in Summersworth, most likely by January,
1737, and that parish hired him as schoolmaster in 1738. There were many children in the Sullivan
family. "

"In 1747 or 1748 Master Sullivan moved his family across the river to Berwick, Maine. There in that

rustic community, the tall schoolmaster became a patriarchal figure. Somewhat of a scholar, possibly
even an idler, Master Sullivan supervised the upbringing and education of his children, two of whom,
John and James, were to go far. His wife was noted for her beauty, vanity, and violent temper. Indeed
she must have been a termagant, for earlier, in 1743, her husband sought asylum in Boston or its
environs and returned home only after his wife had apologized for her 'rash and unadvised Speech and
Behaviour'."from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore.

Father: Philip O'Sullivan b: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
Mother: Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

Marriage 1 Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

* Married: 1735

Children

1. [Has No Children] Benjamin Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
2. [Has No Children] Daniel Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
3. [Has No Children] John Sullivan b: 17 FEB 1739/40 in New Hampshire, U.S.A.
4. [Has No Children] James Sullivan b: 22 APR 1744 in Maine, U.S.A.
5. [Has Children] EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
6. [Has No Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1752
_____________________________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on July 13, 2002 -

Re: General John Sullivan
Posted by: Mary Wertin Date: February 10, 2001 at 11:29:14
In Reply to: General John Sullivan by Caroline Sullivan of 6236

There is a book written by Thomas Coffin Amory entitled "Materials for a History of the family of John
Sullivan of Berwick, New England, and of the O'Sullivans of Ardea, Ireland" with pedigree charts
published by University Press in 1893 that is very good.
If you can't get it at the library, contact the DAR in Washington, DC
______________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

Sullivan, John (N. H.). Brigadier-General Continental Army, 22d June, 1775; Major-General, 9th August,
1776; taken prisoner at Long Island, 27th August, 1776; exchanged December, 1776. By the Act of 9th
September, 1778, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General Sullivan,
and to the officers and troops of his command, for their fortitude and bravery displayed in the action of
August 29th (Quaker Hill), in which they repulsed the British forces and maintained the field." By the
act of 14th October, 1779, it was "Resolved, that the thanks of Congress be given to Major-General
Sullivan and the brave officers and soldiers under his command, for effectually executing an important
expedition against such of the Indian nations as, encouraged by the councils of his Britannic majesty,
had perfidiously waged an unprovoked and cruel war against these United States, laid waste many of
their defenseless towns, and with savage barbarity slaughtered the inhabitants thereof." Resigned 30th
November, 1779. (Died 23d January, 1795.)


John married Lydia Remick Worster or Worchester1760.

Taken from ancestry.com on August 11, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3303

* Name: John SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 FEB 1739 in New Hampshire 1
* Death: 23 JAN 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire 1
* Note: Governor of New Hampshire in 1786.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Lydia Remick WORSTER
* Married: 1760

Children
1. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.state.nh.us/nhdhr/glikeness/sulljohn.html -

A Guide to Likenesses of
New Hampshire Officials and Governors
on Public Display at
the Legislative Office Building and the State House
Concord, New Hampshire, to 1998

John Sullivan (1740-1795)

[Portrait of John Sullivan] Sullivan (1740 - 1795) was born at Somersworth (NH). He read law at
Posrtsmouth (NH), with Hon. Samuel Livermore, married (Lydia Worcester) in 1760, and practiced law
at Berwick (ME) until 1763. He and his wife subsequently moved to Durham (NH).

Sullivan was commissioned a major in the New Hampshire militia (1772), and in 1774 he went as a
delegate to the First Continental Congress, meeting at Philadelphia (PA). During the American
Revolution Sullivan rose to the rank of General while compiling a distinguished war record. He resigned
from military service November 30, 1779, at the conclusion of a long and successful campaign to
defeat the Iroquois Nation and their British Loyalist allies, because of poor health.

Sullivan returned to Philadelphia, where Congress was meeting in 1780 - 81, only to be met with
charges of accepting bribes. Sullivan survived an inquiry, then returned to New Hampshire. There he
was a member of the 1782 Constitutional Convention. He served as New Hampshire Attorney General
(1782 - 86) and as Speaker of the House (1785). In 1786 Sullivan was elected President of the state;
he put down riots against the issuing of paper money and was reelected in 1787. A year later (1788)
Sullivan was Chairman of the state convention which ratified the Constitution of the United States, and
he was reelected Speaker of the House. In 1789 Sullivan was again elected President of New
Hampshire, while also being appointed U. S. District Judge of New Hampshire. He held this judgeship
until his death in 1795. Sullivan is interred in the family plot at Durham (NH).

Location: State House, Second Floor, Executive Council Chambers
_____________________________________



John and Lydia had the following children:

+ 17 M i. John Sullivan.

18 M ii. George Sullivanwas born 29 Aug 1771 in Durham, Strafford, New Hampshire. He died 14 Apr 1838 in Exeter, New Hampshire. He was buried in Old Cemetery (Winter Street).

Taken from ancestry.com on August 11, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3303
* Name: John SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 FEB 1739 in New Hampshire 1
* Death: 23 JAN 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire 1
* Note: Governor of New Hampshire in 1786.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Lydia Remick WORSTER
* Married: 1760

Children
1. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_________________________________________________

Taken from http://famousamericans.net/johnsullivan/ -

His son, George, statesman, born in Durham, New Hampshire, 29 August, 1771 ; died
in Exeter, New Hampshire, 14 June, 1838, was graduated at Harvard in 1790, studied
law, was admitted to the bar, and began to practise at Exeter in 1793. He was a
member of the state house of representatives in 1805, attorney-general of New
Hampshire in 1805-'6, a member of congress in 1811-'13, and of the state senate in
1814-'15, and was again attorney-general in 1816-'35. He published orations and
pamphlets.

Taken from http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=S00... -

SULLIVAN, George, 1771-1838

SULLIVAN, George, (son of John Sullivan and nephew of James Sullivan), a
Representative from New Hampshire; born in Durham, N.H., August 29, 1771; was
graduated from Harvard University in 1790; studied law; was admitted to the bar and
commenced practice in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., in 1793; member of the

commenced practice in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., in 1793; member of the
State house of representatives in 1805; attorney general of New Hampshire in 1805
and 1806; elected as a Federalist to the Twelfth Congress (March 4, 1811-March 3,
1813); again a member of the State house of representatives in 1813; served in the
State senate in 1814 and 1815; again attorney general of the State 1816-1835; died
in Exeter, N.H., April 14, 1838; interment in the Old Cemetery (Winter Street).
____________________________________

Taken from http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/sullivan4.html#R9M0JEF78 -

* Sullivan, George (1771-1838) of Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H. Son of John
Sullivan; nephew of James Sullivan. Born in Durham, Strafford County, N.H., August
29, 1771. Member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1805, 1813;
New Hampshire state attorney general, 1805-06, 1815-35; U.S. Representative from
New Hampshire at-large, 1811-13; member of New Hampshire state senate 2nd
District, 1814-16; Presidential Elector for New Hampshire, 1828. Died in Exeter,
Rockingham County, N.H., April 14, 1838. Interment at Winter Street Cemetery,
Exeter, N.H. See also: congressional biography.
____________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
Biographies
S
page 1881
SULLIVAN, George (son of John Sullivan ), a Representative from New Hampshire;
born in Durham, N.H., August 29, 1771; was graduated from Harvard University in
1790; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Exeter,
Rockingham County, N.H., in 1793; member of the State house of representatives in
1805; attorney general of New Hampshire in 1805 and 1806; elected to the Twelfth
Congress (March 4, 1811-March 3, 1813); again a member of the State house of
representatives in 1813; served in the State senate in 1814 and 1815; again attorney
general of the State 1816-1835; died in Exeter, N.H., April 14, 1838; interment in the
Old Cemetery (Winter Street).
____________________________


19 F iii. Lydia Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on August 11, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3303
* Name: John SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 FEB 1739 in New Hampshire 1
* Death: 23 JAN 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire 1
* Note: Governor of New Hampshire in 1786.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Lydia Remick WORSTER
* Married: 1760


Children
1. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.angelfire.com/wv/snr/jcdurrie.html on July 15, 2002 -

NEW HAMPSHIRE FAMILY OF STEELES.

1. Thomas Steele, of and from Ireland, born probably about 1694; married, as
believed, in Londonderry, in Ireland, Miss Morrison; settled in Londonderry,
Rockingham Co. N.H. 1719; married about 1715; They had children.

2. James*2 b. in Ireland, about 1716; when of age, removed to Antrim, NH; he m.__
_ ___, and d. 1818 or 1819, aged 102 years.

3. John*2 b. in Londonderry, NH; after his father's settlement there had a family;
among them was James*3 who went to western New York.

4. David*2 b. in Londonderry, NH, in 1727; m. Janet Little, in 1751; she was b. in
Ireland, in 1729, and moved to Lunenburg, Mass., in 1738; they removed to
Londonderry, lived there ten years; then removed to Peterborough, NH where they
died; he d. July 19, 1809, aged 82; his wife d. Sept. 1816, aged 87.

Children of David*2(4) and Janet (Little)Steele

5. (1). Thomas*3 (12) b.__; m. Ann Moon of Peterboro; d. in 1847, aged 94 years.

6. (2). Janet*3 b.___; m. Samuel Gregg; she resided in 1850, at Sharon,NH, aged 95,
a remarkable intelligent lady; they had 5 children, one of whom, Warling, removed to
New York, in 1816; d. there 1849, in autumn, and left a family.

7. (3). David*3 (20) b.___; m. Miss Powers; d. about 1840, leaving three children.

8. (4). Martha*3 b.___;m. Benjamin Mitchell, and had 9 children, of whom Jonathan
and John reside in New York State; the rest who survive reside in New Hampshire;
she lived at Peterborough, in 1850, aged 87 years, and enjoyed good health.

8. (5) Johathan*3b.___;m. the daughter of Major-Gen John Sullivan of the Revolution;
d. in Sept. 3, 1824, in Durham, N.H.; he was an attorney, and was appointed Judge
of the Supreme Court of the State, Feb. 19, 1810.

9. (6) Betty*3 b.___; m. James Wilson, and d. 1806, leaving 1 child, Gen. James
Wilson, member of Congress; he was 53 years of age, in 1850; his father was
member of Congress, in 1810.

10. (7). Peggy*3 b.___;m. John Smith; d. about 1835, in Peterborough; had 8
children; one of them, Robert Smith, was M.C. for Illinois, for 6-8 years; of Alton, Ill.;
James and William Smith are merchants in St. Louis, Mo.

11. (8.) John*3 (25) b. ___; m. Polly Wilson, sister of James (above), in 1794; she d.
Feb. 1819, aged 42 years; he m. 2d. Hepsiba, widow of Jonathan Hammond of

Swanzy ( ); he d. Aug. 1845, aged 73 years.


Lydia married Johathan Steeleson of David Steele and Janet Little.

Taken from http://www.angelfire.com/wv/snr/jcdurrie.html on July 15, 2002 -

NEW HAMPSHIRE FAMILY OF STEELES.

1. Thomas Steele, of and from Ireland, born probably about 1694; married, as
believed, in Londonderry, in Ireland, Miss Morrison; settled in Londonderry,
Rockingham Co. N.H. 1719; married about 1715; They had children.

2. James*2 b. in Ireland, about 1716; when of age, removed to Antrim, NH; he m.__
_ ___, and d. 1818 or 1819, aged 102 years.

3. John*2 b. in Londonderry, NH; after his father's settlement there had a family;
among them was James*3 who went to western New York.

4. David*2 b. in Londonderry, NH, in 1727; m. Janet Little, in 1751; she was b. in
Ireland, in 1729, and moved to Lunenburg, Mass., in 1738; they removed to
Londonderry, lived there ten years; then removed to Peterborough, NH where they
died; he d. July 19, 1809, aged 82; his wife d. Sept. 1816, aged 87.

Children of David*2(4) and Janet (Little)Steele

5. (1). Thomas*3 (12) b.__; m. Ann Moon of Peterboro; d. in 1847, aged 94 years.

6. (2). Janet*3 b.___; m. Samuel Gregg; she resided in 1850, at Sharon,NH, aged 95,
a remarkable intelligent lady; they had 5 children, one of whom, Warling, removed to
New York, in 1816; d. there 1849, in autumn, and left a family.

7. (3). David*3 (20) b.___; m. Miss Powers; d. about 1840, leaving three children.

8. (4). Martha*3 b.___;m. Benjamin Mitchell, and had 9 children, of whom Jonathan
and John reside in New York State; the rest who survive reside in New Hampshire;
she lived at Peterborough, in 1850, aged 87 years, and enjoyed good health.

8. (5) Johathan*3b.___;m. the daughter of Major-Gen John Sullivan of the Revolution;
d. in Sept. 3, 1824, in Durham, N.H.; he was an attorney, and was appointed Judge
of the Supreme Court of the State, Feb. 19, 1810.

9. (6) Betty*3 b.___; m. James Wilson, and d. 1806, leaving 1 child, Gen. James
Wilson, member of Congress; he was 53 years of age, in 1850; his father was
member of Congress, in 1810.

10. (7). Peggy*3 b.___;m. John Smith; d. about 1835, in Peterborough; had 8
children; one of them, Robert Smith, was M.C. for Illinois, for 6-8 years; of Alton, Ill.;
James and William Smith are merchants in St. Louis, Mo.

11. (8.) John*3 (25) b. ___; m. Polly Wilson, sister of James (above), in 1794; she d.
Feb. 1819, aged 42 years; he m. 2d. Hepsiba, widow of Jonathan Hammond of
Swanzy ( ); he d. Aug. 1845, aged 73 years.


20 M iv. James Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on August 11, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em

Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3303
* Name: John SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 FEB 1739 in New Hampshire 1
* Death: 23 JAN 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire 1
* Note: Governor of New Hampshire in 1786.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Lydia Remick WORSTER
* Married: 1760

Children
1. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_________________________________________________


+ 21 F v. Mary Sullivanwas born 1775.

8. James Sullivan(John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born 22 Apr 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine. He died 10 Dec 1808 in Boston, Massachusetts. He was buried in Central Boston Common Cemetery, Boston, Mass.

Taken from http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/sullivan5.html

* Sullivan, James (1744-1808) Brother of John Sullivan; uncle of George Sullivan. Born in Berwick,
York County, Maine, April 22, 1744. State court judge, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from
Massachusetts, 1782-83; Massachusetts state attorney general, 1790-1807; Governor of Massachusetts,
1807-08; died in office 1808. Died December 10, 1808. Interment at Central Boston Common
Cemetery, Boston, Mass. See also: congressional biography.
______________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...=
Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick, Ireland, 1692; school
master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801; Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the
Major General in the Revolution), James (Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist.
Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376, Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

James Sullivan
Sprague's Journal of Maine History

Sprague's Journal of Maine History
Vol. VII FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4
Page 171-187

James Sullivan

(BY JOHN FRANCIS SPRAGUE.)

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim that the Sullivans of Maine descended
from the O'Sullivans of ancient Ireland.

They were a powerful septa, who dwelt in the southerly part of Ireland and are now extensively
multiplied on both sides of theAtlantic.

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American activities.

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin to a remote period in Irish history.

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their national annals from the beginning of
organized government under the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion
resulting from English invasion.

Irish historians assert that it is a well authenticated fact that under Queen Elizabeth, one measure
adopted for the more perfect subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national
and private repositories these records, that by gradually weaken- ing, through their destruction, the
spirit of clanship, the land might become an easier prey to the spoiler.

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and in many of the ancient chronicles, or
psalters which escaped this authorized vandalism frequent mention is made of the O'Sullivans,
and their chieftains.

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first began upon its shores, Ireland had been as
highly civilized as any part of western Europe. During those times and to a more recent date the
O'Sullivans, who were hereditary princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the Province of Munster,
and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarney.

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their domains for a long time remaining
unmolested by the invaders they lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans.

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive century until the brave O'Sullivans
early in the seventeenth cen- tury were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and
devastation. To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful clan to the time when John Sullivan left
Limerick in Ireland and sailed for America would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the
history of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his destination was is not now known.
The ship in which he sailed was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed in York.

0n this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting romance. On the vessel was a pretty and
attractive child named Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it appears that they were lost at sea.

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left with his family the following statement:

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan,
original descendant from the second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey, and sister to Captain Edmond McSweeney, a
noted man for anecdotes and witty sayings. I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for
his mother and grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My father died of an
ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he received in France, in a duel with a French officer.
They were all a short lived family; they either died in their bloom or went out of the country I never

heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem-
ber but one alive when I left home My mother's name was Toan McCar- thy, daughter of Dermod
McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she
was daughter to McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias
McFinnin, and [its two brothers, Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went in the defence of the nation
against Orange. Owen was killed in the battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of
McFinnin. Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the
siege of Cork. He left two sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of
Bannane. His brother Owen married Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the
bar- ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented.
They were short-lived on both sides; but the brevity of their lives, to my great grief and sorrow, is
added to the length of mine. My mother's sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'Sullivan,
lord of Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin.

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea-son of his mother violently opposing his
union with a certain young lady that ;he was deeply attached to.

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing in Limerick he was nearly penniless
when he left home and entered into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him
after his arrival, to pay his passage to America. Unaccustomed to labor he applied to Parson Moody, of
York, whom he had been informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can-celing his obligation to the captain.

John was well educated and tinder the advice of Parson Moody and some of his friends he opened a
school at Berwick and became successful school teacher in York County.

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been indentured in accordance with the colonial
custom of providing for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he
redeemed her from indenture and adopted her and brought her up and educated her as his own child.
When she had reached the period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms and
attractions.

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young man, clad in city attire, came by and
engaged her in conversation. Fascinated by her charms. he then and there proposed marriage
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. Sullivan. He consulted Margery who
frankly admitted that she had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much
to his joy, he assured him that she had no thought of anything serious. But the circumstance revealed
to him his own sentiment towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal.
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual and although he was twenty years her senior, so
far as any records or evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union.

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted his attention when not engaged in
teaching. Much of the time he had two schools under his charge.

He has been described as "a marked man in his personal appear- ance, of great natural abilities and
mental cultivation."

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory (1) asserts that he did not attend religious
services in the neighbor- hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that reason "it has
been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast to the faith of his childhood."

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great energy and firmness of character.

Amory (supra) says: " Her sons very probably inherited largely from her the ambition and industry that
made them useful and dis-tinguished."


James, the fourth son of John Sullivan. was born in Berwick, Maine, April 22, 1744.

As a boy he worked on his father's farm attending to duties common to such a life, which then included
a constant watchful- ness to guard against the predatory forays of the Indians.

His father designed to rear him for military service but an accident which happened to him when a lad
changed the course of his life. This was the complicated fracture of one of his legs while felling a tree.

His foot, while pressed upon a branch to secure better play for his axe, accidentally slipping, the bent
tree sprang into place. James was thrown down, and his leg, caught in the cleft, was
badly broken. The usual version of the story adds that, while thus prostrate , he cut his limb free with
his axe, and, dragging himself along the ground to the stone-drag, contrived to work his
way on to it, and drive the oxen home, the distance of a mile, to his father's house. This accident led
to a long illness and the consequence was lameness for life. (2)

John Sullivan, Jr., the oldest brother of James was a lawyer of ability in Durham, New Hampshire. He
was a revolutionary gen- eral of renown, prominent in the Continental Congress, once gov-
ernor of his state, and was a man highly respected and honored at home and throughout the country.

(1) Amory's Life of James Sullivan (Boston, 1859)
(2) Ib. 21.

About 1764 James entered his office as a student at law. While living there he became acquainted with
Hatty Ordiorne, daughter of William Ordiorne a ship builder, and also commissioner under
the royal government. He was married to Miss Ordiorne Feb. 22, 1768. As soon as he had completed
his course of legal studies he went to Georgetown in his native state and commenced the practice of
law. It was only a small village with poor business prospects. It is related that some one asked him
why he had chosen such a place for the beginning of his legal career. His answer was that wishing to
break Into the world somewhere, he had concluded to assail it at its weakest point.

Not far above, on the bank of the Kennebec river in what is now the town of Dresden is still standing
an ancient building, long since used for other purposes, which was then the court house for the county
of Lincoln. It had been erected some years earlier by the Plymouth Company, who were proprietors of
extensive tracts of land on the Kennebec, under the supervision of Dr. Sylvester Gar-
diner. Within its walls have been heard the eloquent voices of James Otis, John Adams, the Quincys,
the Sewalls and other emi- nent lawyers of those days. It was here that James Sullivan
argued his first case before a jury.

He did not however long remain at Georgetown. Biddeford and Pepperrellborough, now Saco, were
more promising towns for a young lawyer and thither he removed locating ill Biddeford.

" Riding the circuits " of the courts was then the universal custom. Through this system unknown to
any one of this or even the past generation in Maine, the attorneys of Boston and other
large towns in the province held the professional, business of Maine towns; for when riding these
circuits they not only attended to the litigation where they not been retained, but secured new cases at
the same time. In other words the Boston lawyers by its means held what was practically a monopoly
of the desirable law practice in Maine. It was naturally the smaller class of business and law cases hat
fell to the local professionals. Yet it appears that young Sullivan was making progress acquiring an
enviable reputatior. as an advocate and building tip a good practice.

But for some years prior to the revolution litigation throughout, the Colonies almost ceased. This War
caused by the universal opposition to the measures of the mother government. Men whose,
minds were on problems which were to change the history of the world for centuries lost interest in
disputes with their neighbors. Business generally was paralyzed and none suffered more than the
lawyers. The courts were virtually suspended.



Through his family he owned real estate in what is now the town, of Limerick. The gloom which
political eruptions cast over others did not affect laid aside quill, paper and wafers, and took instead ax,
shovel and plow, and joined the settlers who had started to build a new town in York County. He
labored on his land during the week returning every Saturday on horseback, a distance of thirty miles
to his home and law office in Biddeford. He was popular with these settlers who named their town
Limerick in honor of his father who was born in Limerick, in Ireland.

John Adams who frequently attended the courts at Saco formed Sullivan's acquaintance. He and other
leading lawyers on the eastern circuit were pleased with him and kind in their attentions
to him.

Mr. Adams mentions in his diary under the date of July, 1770, 1 visit made to the house of Mr. Sullivan.
He was in company with Farnham, Winthrop, and David Sewall; the latter after-
wards an associate with Sullivan on the supreme bench. Farnham and Sewall started somewhat earlier
than their companions, that they might order dinner at Allen's Tavern, at the Biddeford
Bridge; and towards noon Adams and Winthrop joined them at the dwelling of James Sullivan. After
refreshing themselves with punch then the usual beverage, they all adjourned to the tavern
to dine; and, when they had finished their repast, Sullivan pro- posed to the party a visit to an ancient
crone in the neighborhood, who, from her great age and accurate memory of things long past, was one
of the wonders of that part of the country. She was one hundred and fifteen years of age, having been
born in 1655, near Derry, in Ireland. She remembered events in the reign of Charles the Second,
having lived under seven English monarchs. (3)

In a letter to his wife, dated York, 29th June, 1774, Mr. Adams makes further mention of both John
and James Sullivan: There is very little business here, and David Sewall, David Wyer, John
Sullivan and James Sullivan and Theophilus Bradbury are the lawyers who attend the inferior courts,
and, consequently, conduct the causes at the superior.

I find that the country is the situation to make estates by the law. John Sullivan, who is placed at
Durham, in New Hampshire, is younger, both in years and practice, than I am. He began with nothing,
bat is now said to (3) Ib. 433. be worth ten thousand pounds, lawful money; his brother James has five
or six, or perhaps seven, thousand pounds, consisting in houses and lands, notes
and mortgages. He has a fine stream of water, with an excellent corn-mill, saw-mill, fulling-mill, scythe-
mill and others, in all, six mills, which are both his delight and his profit. As he has earned cash in his
business at the bar, he has taken opportunities to purchase farms of his neighbors, who wanted to sell
and move out further into the woods, at an advantageous rate, and in this way has been growing rich.
Under the smiles and auspices of Governor Wentworth, he has been promoted in the civil and military
way, so that he is treated with great respect in this neighborhood.

James Sullivan, brother of the other, who studied law under him, without an academically education
(and John was in the same case), is fixed at Saco alias Biddeford, in our province. He began with
neither learning, books, estates, nor anything but his head and hands, and is now a very popular law-
yer, and growing rich very fast, purchasing great farms, and is a justice of the peace and a member of
the General Court.

Sentiment in Maine towns like Biddeford and Pepperrellbourgh began early to formulate against the
policy of Great Britain to arbitrarily govern the colonies through a parliament in which they were not
represented. A study of such of the old records of these towns of that period which are now extant
disclose the grad- ual yet steady growth of the spirit of American independence.

The New England town meeting was then, and is today the forum of a real democracy is a small
republic in itself. It was the one American institution that first demonstrated to the world that man
was capable of self government. It was that net work of the committees of safety organized in the
beginning by Samuel Adams and his associates, and who were elected in town meetings in which every
voter was a sovereign, that gave cohesive strength to the patriots.

As early as 1774 James Sullivan embraced the cause of American independence and his ability and

popularity made him a power of strength in the movement with the inhabitants of the Maine settle-
ments.

In the spring of that year he was elected a representative to the General Court. On the first day of June
the tyrannical and hated Boston Port Bill went into effect. Samuel Adams and James Warren were the
recognized leaders of the court which 'had con- vened at Salem. Upon the standing committee on the
state of the province were four men whose loyalty was distrusted by Adams
and Warren. They selected a few men whom they believed were true for conference, and Sullivan was
one of these. For three nights they met in secrecy and devised measures for future opera-
tion. The third evening a plan was matured for the initiation of a general congress for the continent to
meet the following Septem- ber at Philadelphia. The delegates were selected, funds provided,
and letters prepared to the other colonies requesting cooperation. James Sullivan was one of these
delegates. Behind closed doors, Samuel Adams having a key to it safe in his own pocket the report
was accepted, although the messenger of Governor Gage was then reading outside on the stair case
the proclamation dissolving the court.

After Mr. Sullivan's return to his home on the 30th day of July. a spirited town meeting was held in
Biddeford, fully endorsing the course of their representative and adopting resolutions that placed them
in entire accord with the patriots of the colonies.

On September 1st, 1774. Governor Gage issued his precept for the General Court to convene at Salem
on the fifth day of October. Sensing the strong sentiment for resistance that was daily increas-ing
among all classes of the people, on the twenty-eighth day of September he made proclamation
postponing it indefinitely. The delegates many of them not hearing this had arrived and came together.
They waited a day for the governor to appear before them which he did not do. They then resolved
themselves into a Provincial Congress, choosing John Hancock president and Benj. Lincoln clerk. This
was the beginning of the Continental Con- gress of which Mr. Sullivan was an active and influential
member.

On the twenty-second day of December he was moderator of a town meeting in Biddeford, and was
chosen a " member of the com- mittee of Safety and Inspection and empowered to correspond with
other Maine towns. Because of his lameness he could not, like his brothers, take part in the military
resistance of the coun- try. But the effect of his voice and pen in behalf of liberty was felt not only in
Maine but throughout the colonies.

The second session of the Continental Congress convened Feb. 1, 1775, at the meeting house in
Cambridge. A committee of its members was appointed to publish in a pamphlet the doings of the
late Congress, and to prepare an address to the inhabitants. Mi. Sullivan had a place on that committee
and wrote a report and address.

Through his efforts the Congress passed measures for the pro- tection of the settlements in eastern
Maine and he was appointed to consider the expediency of enlisting Indians for the war.

He issued the following letter to the eastern tribes:

Friends and Good Brothers: We, the delegates of the Colony of the Mas- sachusetts Bay, being come
together in congress to consider what may be best for you and ourselves to do to get rid of the slavery
designed to be brought upon us, have thought it our duty to write you the following letter:

Brothers: The great wickedness of such as should be our friends, but are our enemies we mean the
ministry of Great Britain, has laid deep plots, to take away our liberty and your liberty. They want to
get all our money; make us pay it to them, when they never earned it; to make you and us their
servants; and let us have nothing to eat, drink, or wear, but what they say we shall; and prevent us
from having guns and powder to use, and kill our deer. and wolves and other game, or to get skins and
fur to trade with us or what you want; but we hope soon to be able to supply
you with both guns and powder of our own making.



We have petitioned to England for you and us, and told them plainly we want nothing but our own, and
do not want to hurt them; but they will not hear us, and have sent over great ships, and their men,
with guns, to make us give up, and kill us, and have killed some of our men; but we
have driven them back and beat them, and killed a great many of their men.

The Englishmen of all the colonies, from Nova Scotia to Georgia, have firmly resolved to stand together
and oppose them. Our liberty and your liberty is the same; we are brothers, and what is for our good is
for your good; and we, by standing together, shall make those wicked men afraid,
and overcome them, and all be free men. Captain Goldthwait has given tip Fort Pownall into the hands
of our enemies; we are angry at it, and we hear you r,: angry with him, and we do not wonder at it.
We want to know what you, our good brothers, want from us of clothing, or warlike
stores. and we will supply you as fast as we can. We will do all for you we can, and fight to save you,
any time, wid hope that none of your men, or the Indians in Canada, will join with our enemies. You
may have a great deal of influence over them. Our good brothers, the Indians at Stock- bridge, all join
with us. and some of their men have enlisted as soldiers, and we have given THEM that enlisted, each
one, a blanket, and a ribbon, and they will be paid when they are from home, in the service: and, if
any of, you are willing to enlist, we wiil do the same for you.

Brothers: We beseech that God who lives above, and that does what is right here below, to be your
friend and bless you, and to prevent the designs of those wicked men from hurting you or us.

By this means, Indians from the Penobscot tribe and from other parts of Maine were soldiers in this war.

He drafted the act passed by the Massachusetts General Court
Nov. 11, 1775, for fitting out armed vessels to protect the sea coast;
authorizing the issue of letters of marque and reprisal, erecting
courts for the condemnation of prizes.

John Adams in a letter to Elbridge Gerry under date of April
10, 1810, mentions it as one of the most important documents in
history as it was the first actual avowal by any deliberative body
in America of intended offensive hostilities to be found in the
annals of the revolution. (4)

All accessible sources of :Information of the revolutionary period
Whether in books of history or in old documents and records attest
to the fact that, from the first to last, James Sullivan stood high in
the confidence of the leaders in that great struggle and was admitted
to their most intimate council's. And none were more fearless and
active in the cause then was he.

He served on the general Committee of Safety from its incept-
ion until the close of the war. It is related by Colonel Paul
Revere, that, in the winter of 1774-5, he was one of thirty patriots.
who formed a committee for the purpose of watching the British
soldiers, and learning of their intended movements. When they
met each member swore on the Bible not to reveal any of their
transactions but to Warren, Hancock, Adams, Church and one or
two others. (5)

It was largely through his efforts that the Judas of their little
band, Dr. Benjamin Church was detected in revealing their secrets
to Governor Gage and summary punishment therefore adminis-
tered to him.

He had great influence with the council and always exerted it,
whenever necessary in aid of Maine interests.


When Captain Mowatt reduced Falmouth to ashes, his power
at the seat of government was a great blessing to its distressed
and homeless inhabitants. It was also largely through his efforts
that immediate action was taken by the council to more safely
fortify and protect that fort.

Three admiralty judges were appointed under the act above
referred to. These were: Nathan Cushing, for the southern;
Timothy Pickering for the central and Mr. Sullivan for the eastern
district.

As we trace his career from 1774 to the close of the Revolution
we see General Washington ever placing the utmost confidence ill
his integrity, his ability and his devotion to the cause of freedom
and seeking his counsel.

About eighteen months after he had taken his seat in the Pro-
vincial Congress he was appointed by the Council, it being then

(4) Ib. p. 62
(5) Ib. p. 57


clothed with executive as well as legislative powers, to a seat on
the bench of the Superior Court of judicature. This was the
highest or supreme court of the province. His letter of acceptance
dated March 27, 1776, was as follows:

I am informed by the secretary that the honorable Council have appointed
me a justice of the Supreme Court, and that they request my answer thereto,
Since the appointment forbids my saying that I am entirely incapable of
transacting the business incident to that office, I beg leave to acquaint you
that I shall cheerfully accept of, and studiously endeavor to qualify rnyself
for, the honorable and important seat assigned me The present relaxation
of government, and the many difficulties in straightening the reins thereof
at this critical juncture, would be very discouraging, were it not for the
great abilities of the honorable gentlemen I am to sit with. This appoint-
ment is the reason of my begging to resign the office of judge of the mari-
time court for the eastern district of this colony, to which some time ago
I had the honor of being appointed.

His associates were William Cushing, afterwards appointed to
the Supreme Court of the United States under the federal consti-
tuition, Jedediah Foster, Nathan Peaslee Sargent and David Sewall
-It was a high honor for this youngman who had not completed
his thirty-second year. Yet it required courage to serve in that
capacity. Some writer has said that those early judges "sat with
halters around their necks."

These builders of a new government called themselves patriots
and the world has ever since known them by that name, but the
British government hailed them as rebels. And had the rebellion
proven a failure the members of the highest court in rebeldom
would undoubtedly have been among the first to mount the scaffold.

The first problem that confronted the court was how to quickly

assemble a law library for their use the possession of which was
an absolute necessity. They could not very well order one from
London. The lawyers of the colony who had turned their backs
upon the patriots and remained loyal to the crown were of the high
class of attorneys who owned valuable libraries. They had fled,
many of them going to England and in their haste had left
their law books behind. These were promptly confiscated and
purchased from the new government by the new court.
Eben Sullivan the younger brother of James as well as his older
brother John, one of the famous generals of the Revolution was
now captain of a company that he had raised at Berwick of which
Nathan Lord was lieutenant. This company had been in the
engagement at Bunker's Hill. He was in the Canadian expedition
and was at one time taken prisoner by the Indians of Canada, held
as prisoner for some time and experienced suffering and cruelty
at their hands but finally escaped.

As the problems of war times multiplied and perplexities became
more complex his judicial duties increased and he began to realize
that it was necessary for him to reside nearer the seat of govern-
mente. He loved the neighborhood of his nativity. In Biddeford
and Pepperrellborough he had trusted and tried friends always
devoted to his interests. He loved them and loved the grand ocean
side where he had grown from boyhood to mature manhood; and
the old fishing and hunting grounds of his youth were dear to him.

But feeling that duty called him to make this sacrifice, in February,
1778, he sold his house at Biddeford to Joseph Morrill and moved
to Groton, in the county of Middlesex. A few years later he
settled in Boston which was his home during the remainder of his
life.

Having no written constitution they then did things which would
today seem strange to us. The people of Biddeford and Pepper-
rellborough reposed such confidence in him-and there being then
no organic law to prevent a member of the court from sitting in
the Legislature, that after this change of abode he was re-elected
as their representative for 1778-9.

When the question of changing their form of government by
adopting a constitution entirely independent of their charter was
agitated by the colony, he was chosen to represent Groton in a
constitutional convention an took a leading part in all of its
deliberations.

At this period of our history England had not abolished the
slave trade and black men were bought and sold like cattle in all
of the colonies including the District of Maine. From the dawn
of our political emancipation the glaring inconsistency of this con-
dition with our pretensions to equality and freedom was apparent
to many.

James Sullivan was one of the earliest to call public attention to
it. The black man was then as he has ever since been in all of our
wars, loyal to his oppressors. A black man was one of the victims,

of the Boston massacre in 1770; and the shot which killed Major
Pitcairn at Bunker's Hill is said to have been fired by a black slave
owned by one of the patriots.
Judge Sullivan improved every opportunity in his judicial capac-
ity, as a legislator and as a publicist to put an end to the slave
traffic.

The name of John Quincy Adams shines forth in glorious splen-
dor as the first great American to make a successful fight in Con-
gress in the Anti Slavery cause, when he contended for the right
of petition. We are however proud of the fact that a Maine man,
Tames Sullivan, was his predecessor in this crusade. The differ-
ence was that fate gave Mr. Adams the opportunity to be with the
in the struggle.

In 1775 he was sent on a difficult commission to Ticonderoga in
company with W. Spooner and J. Foster, for whose services the
Provincial Congress passed a vote of thanks.

On the fourth of July, 1782, Samuel Adams, Nathaniel Gorham,
William Phillips, James Sullivan, George Cabot, Stephen Higginson
and Leonard Jarvis, were appointed by resolve, to consider-

What measures were to be taken to reduce 'the expenses of government,
show the best method of supplying the public treasury, and reforming the
state of the finances.

Towards the end of 1784 he was present at the Congress, then
sitting at Trenton, as commissioner for prosecuting the claim of
Massachusetts to the western lands.

He resigned his seat on the bench and returned to the practice
of the law in Boston, but yet was never entirely disengaged from
public and political affairs.

In 1788 he was appointed Judge of Probate for Suffolk County.

In 1790 he resigned this office and became Attorney General.

Our forefathers' interest in preserving a history of their state
and country was great. It was so in the early days of Maine and
remained so until recent years. Then the most eminent citizens
holding the most honorable positions, governors, federal senators,
congressmen, etc., were the founders of our historical societies.
How regrettable it is that many at least of Maine's leading men
of this day and generation view this subject from such an angle
of cold indifference as they do.

James Sullivan was one of the organizers of the Massachusetts
Historical Society and its first president. In 1792 this Society
celebrated the third centennial anniversary of the discovery of
America by Columbus. Jeremy Belknap delivered the address at
its meeting at Brattle Street church. Dr. Thacher offered prayer.
That evening Hancock and Adams, the governor and lieutenant
governor, with the council dined with Mr. Sullivan, its president,
whose residence was in Bowdoin square.



The government at Washington, May 31, 1796, appointed him
as agent for the United States, to maintain their interests before
the Board of Commissioners, who were to decide what river was
the river St. Croix, according to the fifth article of the treaty of
amity, commerce and navigation, with Great Britain. In the
instructions from the government to judge Sullivan accompanying
this notice appears the following:

Your researches as the historian of the district of Maine, your reputation
as a lawyer, and your official employment as the attorney-general of Massa-
chusetts, the state directly and most materially interested in the event,
have designated you as the agent of the United States to manage their claim
of boundary where their territory joins that of his Britannic Majesty, in
his province of New Brunswick, formerly q part of his province of Nova
Scotia.

The decision of this commission as to what was the true St.
Croix river occasioned much discussion at the time and has ever
since been a fertile theme of controversy among historians. The
late Honorable Israel Washburn (Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., Vol. 8,
pp. 3-103) attacked it severely claiming that the findings of the
commission were wrong and that the State of Maine thereby lost
a valuable territory which rightfully belonged to it.

The writer has given the subject considerable study and is now
of the opinion it was a correct decision.

Politically judge Sullivan stood with Washington and Adams,
and was in accord with most of the federalist policies but later
was more closely allied with the Republicans. He never was how-
ever as far as we can understand in sympathy with the sedition
laws enacted and supported by the Federalists. And yet as attor-
ney general it devolved upon him in 1799 to prosecute one Abijah
Adams for libeling the Legislature.

Sullivan prosecuted and he was indicted at common law, con-
victed and sentenced to imprisonment.

As a writer for newspapers and periodicals his record as an
earnest advocate for freedom of the press is clear and certain. In
that time the troubles in France had an abiding influence upon
American politics.

Sullivan's entire political career evidences the fact that he was a
friend -to France. His enemies accused him of taking this position
because he was of Irish descent and France was then assisting Irish
rebels.

Undoubtedly there was some truth in this. At least we do not
find anything to show a desire on his part to deny it.
At the close of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth
centuries the powerful Federalist party was disintegrating. It had
served the country well during the construction days. But later
its policies were un-American and it was doomed to fall. judge
Sullivan was twice the Republican candidate for governor and was
elected in 1807. Both campaigns were bitter and acrimonious.-
What we would today term "dirty politics" prevailed to the limit.

His administration though brief was wise and statesmanlike and
never assailed by his enemies. His love for the people of Maine
was exemplified by his persistent efforts to secure for them the
Betterment Act, or Squatter law. It was finally carried through
the legislature under the leadership of William King of Bath, as
proposed by Governor Sullivan.

He was re-elected governor in 1809 and died December 4th of
that year. James had four brothers, Benjamin, an officer in the
British Navy who was lost at sea before the Revolution; Daniel
who was a captain in the Revolutionary War and the founder of
the town of Sullivan in the State of Maine; John, already men-
tioned, Who was a major general in the Continental army and Gov-
ernor of New Hampshire; and Ebenezer, an officer in the Revo-
lution and a lawyer in Berwick, Maine. He had one sister, Mary,
who married Theophilus Hardy.

As an author, writer and historian he will be best remembered
by his "History of the District of Maine," published in Boston
in 1795, and the first history of Maine to be published.

This was followed by " A History of the Land Titles in Massa-
chusetts." The early volumes of the Collections of the Massachu-
setts Historical Society contain others of his writings which are
valuable contributions to our colonial history.
His death was mourned 'by the entire commonwealth. Resolves
relating to his record as a public man were passed by the Legisla-
ture and an address of condolence signed by the President of the
Senate and Speaker of the House was sent to his widow, Martha
Sullivan. The Rev. Mr. Buckmore delivered a funeral sermon in
which he said: not the place to detail to, you minutely the progress of his eleva-
tion, from the time when he first drew the observation of his country.
every step is marked with labor and with vigor; with increasing confidence
in the public, and with unabated zeal and activity in the man. There is
hardly a station of trust, of toil, or of dignity, in the commonwealth, where
his name does not appear, though now only as a part of former records;
and, in the regions of science and literature, where we should least expect
them, we find the most frequent traces of his efforts, and of his indefatigable
industry.

Samuel L. Knapp at that time wrote of him:

Our country has a property in the characters of its great men. They shed
a glory over its annals, and are bright examples for future citizens. Other
nations, too, may enjoy their light. The flame of liberty has been caught
from the patriots of Greece and Rome by men who were not born in those
lands. while the descendants of those patriots have forgotten the fame of
their ancestors. And should it happen, contrary to all our prayers and all
our trusts, that the inhabitants of this country, at some period hereafter.
should lose the freedom and the spirit of their fathers, the history of our
Adamses, our Warrens and our Sullivans, shall wake the courage of patriots
on distant shores, and teach them to triumph over oppression.
James Winthrop said:

As governor lie was remarkably successful in mitigating the severity of
the political parties which divided the state, and their leaders generally and

sincerely regretted his death, * * * and was buried with the honors
conferred on his exalted station, and which were acknowledged to belong
to his distinguished merit.

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Taken from http://politicalgraveyard.com/geo/MA/ofc/ccdel.html -

Delegates to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-87 (May be incomplete!)
Samuel Holten 177? John Adams 1774-78 Samuel Adams 1774-81 Thomas Cushing 1774-76 Robert
Treat Paine 1774- John Hancock 1775-78 Elbridge Gerry 1776-80 Francis Dana 1777-78 James Lovell
1777-82 Caleb Strong 1780 Artemas Ward 1780-81 George Partridge 178? Theodore Sedgwick 178?
Levi Lincoln 1781 Samuel Osgood 1781-84 Elbridge Gerry 1782-85 Nathaniel Gorham 1782-83
Jonathan Jackson 1782 John Lowell 1782 James Sullivan 1782-83 Stephen Higginson 1783 Francis
Dana 1784 Rufus King 1784-87 Nathan Dane 1785- Nathaniel Gorham 1785-87 Samuel Allyne Otis
1787- George Thatcher 1787-
_________________________________________________

Taken from http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/sullivan5.html#RD60XBL9C -

* Sullivan, James (1744-1808) Brother of John Sullivan; uncle of George Sullivan. Born in Berwick,
York County, Maine, April 22, 1744. State court judge, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from
Massachusetts, 1782-83; Massachusetts state attorney general, 1790-1807; Governor of Massachusetts,
1807-08; died in office 1808. Died December 10, 1808. Interment at Central Boston Common
Cemetery, Boston, Mass. See also: congressional biography.
_______________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
Biographies
S
page 1881
SULLIVAN, James (brother of John Sullivan ), a Delegate from Massachusetts; born in Berwick, Maine
(then a part of Massachusetts), April 22, 1744; completed preparatory studies; studied law; was
admitted to the bar about 1782 and commenced practice in Biddeford; King's attorney for York County;
active in pre-Revolutionary movements; member of the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts in 1774
and 1775; member of the general court in 1775 and 1776; justice of the superior court 1776-1782;
Member of the Continental Congress in 1782; member of the executive council in 1787; judge of
probate for Suffolk County in 1788; State attorney general 1790-1807; Governor of Massachusetts in
1807 and 1808; died in Boston, Mass., December 10, 1808; interment in Central Boston Common

Cemetery.
_________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
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* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I33997
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1795
* Occupation: Schoolmaster
* Burial: 1731 left Ireland and came to Berwick, Maine.
* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

His son John was rather famous. "Born in Limerick in 1690, Master Sullivan apparently was christened
Owen, retaining that name until after he came to America. Evidently he benefitted from a good
education, perhaps received on the continent, for he spoke French and reportedly was a linguist of

some talent. Why he came to America remains somewhat obscure, although there is reason to believe
that he argued with his mother, who opposed his marrying beneath his station.

Master Sullivan, though loath to work with his hands, soon fulfilled his obligations as a redemptioner;
tradition says he persuaded a clergyman to buy his freedom for him. He soon married Margery Brown
(Browne), who had been born in Cork in 1714. They settled in Summersworth, most likely by January,
1737, and that parish hired him as schoolmaster in 1738. There were many children in the Sullivan
family. "

"In 1747 or 1748 Master Sullivan moved his family across the river to Berwick, Maine. There in that
rustic community, the tall schoolmaster became a patriarchal figure. Somewhat of a scholar, possibly
even an idler, Master Sullivan supervised the upbringing and education of his children, two of whom,
John and James, were to go far. His wife was noted for her beauty, vanity, and violent temper. Indeed
she must have been a termagant, for earlier, in 1743, her husband sought asylum in Boston or its
environs and returned home only after his wife had apologized for her 'rash and unadvised Speech and
Behaviour'."from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore.

Father: Philip O'Sullivan b: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
Mother: Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

Marriage 1 Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

* Married: 1735

Children

1. [Has No Children] Benjamin Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
2. [Has No Children] Daniel Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
3. [Has No Children] John Sullivan b: 17 FEB 1739/40 in New Hampshire, U.S.A.
4. [Has No Children] James Sullivan b: 22 APR 1744 in Maine, U.S.A.
5. [Has Children] EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
6. [Has No Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1752
_____________________________________________________


James married (1) Mehitable (Hetty) Odiarne. Mehitable was born 26 Jun 1748.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN

5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


James and Mehitable had the following children:

+ 22 M i. James Sullivandied 27 Aug 1825.

23 M ii. William Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


24 M iii. John Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -


My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


25 M iv. Richard Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN

3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


26 M v. Bant Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


27 F vi. Nancy Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families

Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


28 F vii. Hettie Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


29 M viii. George Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________



James married (2) Martha Langdon.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families

Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
Please use this as a guide for you own research
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


9. Mary Sullivan(John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born 1752. She died 1827.

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...=
Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick, Ireland, 1692; school
master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801; Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the
Major General in the Revolution), James (Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist.
Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376, Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva...

He was re-elected governor in 1809 and died December 4th of that year. James had four brothers,
Benjamin, an officer in the British Navy who was lost at sea before the Revolution; Daniel
who was a captain in the Revolutionary War and the founder of the town of Sullivan in the State of
Maine; John, already men- tioned, Who was a major general in the Continental army and Gov-
ernor of New Hampshire; and Ebenezer, an officer in the Revo- lution and a lawyer in Berwick, Maine.
He had one sister, Mary, who married Theophilus Hardy.
__________________________________________


Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Mary SULIVAN (AFN: FZC5-MJ)
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1752
<, , New Hampshire>
Death: 1827

Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN)
Marriage(s):

Spouse: Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN: FZ6G-8C) Family
Marriage: 4 May 1768
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 13, 2002 -

Husband's Name
John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Pedigree
Born: 1692 Place: Limerick, , Ireland
Died: 1796 Place: Berwick, , Maine
Married: Abt 1750 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father:
Mother:

Wife's Name
Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN) Pedigree
Born: Abt 1714 Place: Cork, , Ireland
Died: 1801 Place: Berwick, , Maine
Married: Abt 1750 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father:
Mother:

Children
1. Sex Name
F Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
_________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I33997
* Name: John Sullivan
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
* Death: AFT. 1795
* Occupation: Schoolmaster
* Burial: 1731 left Ireland and came to Berwick, Maine.

* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

His son John was rather famous. "Born in Limerick in 1690, Master Sullivan apparently was christened
Owen, retaining that name until after he came to America. Evidently he benefitted from a good
education, perhaps received on the continent, for he spoke French and reportedly was a linguist of
some talent. Why he came to America remains somewhat obscure, although there is reason to believe
that he argued with his mother, who opposed his marrying beneath his station.

Master Sullivan, though loath to work with his hands, soon fulfilled his obligations as a redemptioner;
tradition says he persuaded a clergyman to buy his freedom for him. He soon married Margery Brown
(Browne), who had been born in Cork in 1714. They settled in Summersworth, most likely by January,
1737, and that parish hired him as schoolmaster in 1738. There were many children in the Sullivan
family. "

"In 1747 or 1748 Master Sullivan moved his family across the river to Berwick, Maine. There in that
rustic community, the tall schoolmaster became a patriarchal figure. Somewhat of a scholar, possibly
even an idler, Master Sullivan supervised the upbringing and education of his children, two of whom,
John and James, were to go far. His wife was noted for her beauty, vanity, and violent temper. Indeed
she must have been a termagant, for earlier, in 1743, her husband sought asylum in Boston or its
environs and returned home only after his wife had apologized for her 'rash and unadvised Speech and
Behaviour'."from A General of the Revolution John Sullivan of New Hampshire by Charles P. Whittemore.

Father: Philip O'Sullivan b: BET. 1633 - 1666 in Ardea, Ireland
Mother: Joane McCarthy b: BET. 1641 - 1668

Marriage 1 Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

* Married: 1735

Children

1. [Has No Children] Benjamin Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
2. [Has No Children] Daniel Sullivan b: BEF. 1740
3. [Has No Children] John Sullivan b: 17 FEB 1739/40 in New Hampshire, U.S.A.
4. [Has No Children] James Sullivan b: 22 APR 1744 in Maine, U.S.A.
5. [Has Children] EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
6. [Has No Children] Mary Sullivan b: 1752
_____________________________________________________


Mary married Theophilus Hardy4 May 1768 in New Hampshire. Theophilus was born in (Twin) .

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva...

He was re-elected governor in 1809 and died December 4th of that year. James had four brothers,
Benjamin, an officer in the British Navy who was lost at sea before the Revolution; Daniel
who was a captain in the Revolutionary War and the founder of the town of Sullivan in the State of
Maine; John, already men- tioned, Who was a major general in the Continental army and Gov-
ernor of New Hampshire; and Ebenezer, an officer in the Revo- lution and a lawyer in Berwick, Maine.
He had one sister, Mary, who married Theophilus Hardy.
__________________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Husband's Name
Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-8C) Pedigree
Born: 8 May 1748 Place: Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: Dudley HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-4N) Family

Father: Dudley HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-4N) Family
Mother: Mary (HARDY) (AFN:FZ6G-5T)

Wife's Name
Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN)

Children
1. Sex Name
M Benjamin HARDY (AFN:FZC5-NP)
Born: Abt 1770 Place: , , New Hampshire

2. Sex Name
F Dorothy HARDY (AFN:FZC5-Q2)
Born: Abt 1780 Place: , , New Hampshire

3. Sex Name
F Sarah HARDY (AFN:FZC5-R7)
Born: Abt 1781 Place: , , New Hampshire

4. Sex Name
F Margery HARDY (AFN:FZC5-SD)
Born: Abt 1782 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 1824 Place:

5. Sex Name
M Sullivan HARDY (AFN:FZC5-PV)
Born: 8 Sep 1779 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 28 Feb 1843 Place: , , New Hampshire
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Mary SULIVAN (AFN: FZC5-MJ)
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1752
<, , New Hampshire>
Death: 1827

Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN)
Marriage(s):

Spouse: Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN: FZ6G-8C) Family
Marriage: 4 May 1768
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________


Theophilus and Mary had the following children:

30 M i. Benjamin Hardywas born Abt 1770 in New Hampshire.

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -


Husband's Name
Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-8C) Pedigree
Born: 8 May 1748 Place: Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: Dudley HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-4N) Family
Mother: Mary (HARDY) (AFN:FZ6G-5T)

Wife's Name
Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN)

Children
1. Sex Name
M Benjamin HARDY (AFN:FZC5-NP)
Born: Abt 1770 Place: , , New Hampshire

2. Sex Name
F Dorothy HARDY (AFN:FZC5-Q2)
Born: Abt 1780 Place: , , New Hampshire

3. Sex Name
F Sarah HARDY (AFN:FZC5-R7)
Born: Abt 1781 Place: , , New Hampshire

4. Sex Name
F Margery HARDY (AFN:FZC5-SD)
Born: Abt 1782 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 1824 Place:

5. Sex Name
M Sullivan HARDY (AFN:FZC5-PV)
Born: 8 Sep 1779 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 28 Feb 1843 Place: , , New Hampshire
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Mary SULIVAN (AFN: FZC5-MJ)
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1752
<, , New Hampshire>
Death: 1827

Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN)
Marriage(s):

Spouse: Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN: FZ6G-8C) Family
Marriage: 4 May 1768
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________



31 M ii. Sullivan Hardywas born 8 Sep 1779 in New Hampshire.

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Husband's Name
Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-8C) Pedigree
Born: 8 May 1748 Place: Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: Dudley HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-4N) Family
Mother: Mary (HARDY) (AFN:FZ6G-5T)

Wife's Name
Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN)

Children
1. Sex Name
M Benjamin HARDY (AFN:FZC5-NP)
Born: Abt 1770 Place: , , New Hampshire

2. Sex Name
F Dorothy HARDY (AFN:FZC5-Q2)
Born: Abt 1780 Place: , , New Hampshire

3. Sex Name
F Sarah HARDY (AFN:FZC5-R7)
Born: Abt 1781 Place: , , New Hampshire

4. Sex Name
F Margery HARDY (AFN:FZC5-SD)
Born: Abt 1782 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 1824 Place:

5. Sex Name
M Sullivan HARDY (AFN:FZC5-PV)
Born: 8 Sep 1779 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 28 Feb 1843 Place: , , New Hampshire
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Mary SULIVAN (AFN: FZC5-MJ)
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1752
<, , New Hampshire>
Death: 1827

Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN)
Marriage(s):

Spouse: Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN: FZ6G-8C) Family
Marriage: 4 May 1768

, , New Hampshire
_______________________________


32 F iii. Margery Hardywas born Abt 1782 in New Hampshire. She died 1824.

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Husband's Name
Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-8C) Pedigree
Born: 8 May 1748 Place: Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: Dudley HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-4N) Family
Mother: Mary (HARDY) (AFN:FZ6G-5T)

Wife's Name
Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN)

Children
1. Sex Name
M Benjamin HARDY (AFN:FZC5-NP)
Born: Abt 1770 Place: , , New Hampshire

2. Sex Name
F Dorothy HARDY (AFN:FZC5-Q2)
Born: Abt 1780 Place: , , New Hampshire

3. Sex Name
F Sarah HARDY (AFN:FZC5-R7)
Born: Abt 1781 Place: , , New Hampshire

4. Sex Name
F Margery HARDY (AFN:FZC5-SD)
Born: Abt 1782 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 1824 Place:

5. Sex Name
M Sullivan HARDY (AFN:FZC5-PV)
Born: 8 Sep 1779 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 28 Feb 1843 Place: , , New Hampshire
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Mary SULIVAN (AFN: FZC5-MJ)
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1752
<, , New Hampshire>
Death: 1827

Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN)
Marriage(s):


Marriage(s):

Spouse: Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN: FZ6G-8C) Family
Marriage: 4 May 1768
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________


33 F iv. Sarah Hardywas born Abt 1781 in New Hampshire.

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Husband's Name
Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-8C) Pedigree
Born: 8 May 1748 Place: Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: Dudley HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-4N) Family
Mother: Mary (HARDY) (AFN:FZ6G-5T)

Wife's Name
Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN)

Children
1. Sex Name
M Benjamin HARDY (AFN:FZC5-NP)
Born: Abt 1770 Place: , , New Hampshire

2. Sex Name
F Dorothy HARDY (AFN:FZC5-Q2)
Born: Abt 1780 Place: , , New Hampshire

3. Sex Name
F Sarah HARDY (AFN:FZC5-R7)
Born: Abt 1781 Place: , , New Hampshire

4. Sex Name
F Margery HARDY (AFN:FZC5-SD)
Born: Abt 1782 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 1824 Place:

5. Sex Name
M Sullivan HARDY (AFN:FZC5-PV)
Born: 8 Sep 1779 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 28 Feb 1843 Place: , , New Hampshire
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Mary SULIVAN (AFN: FZC5-MJ)
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1752
<, , New Hampshire>
Death: 1827



Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN)
Marriage(s):

Spouse: Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN: FZ6G-8C) Family
Marriage: 4 May 1768
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________


34 F v. Dorothy Hardywas born Abt 1780 in New Hampshire.

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Husband's Name
Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-8C) Pedigree
Born: 8 May 1748 Place: Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: Dudley HARDY (AFN:FZ6G-4N) Family
Mother: Mary (HARDY) (AFN:FZ6G-5T)

Wife's Name
Mary SULIVAN (AFN:FZC5-MJ) Pedigree
Born: 1752 Place: <, , New Hampshire>
Died: 1827 Place:
Married: 4 May 1768 Place: , , New Hampshire
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN:FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN:FZC6-MN)

Children
1. Sex Name
M Benjamin HARDY (AFN:FZC5-NP)
Born: Abt 1770 Place: , , New Hampshire

2. Sex Name
F Dorothy HARDY (AFN:FZC5-Q2)
Born: Abt 1780 Place: , , New Hampshire

3. Sex Name
F Sarah HARDY (AFN:FZC5-R7)
Born: Abt 1781 Place: , , New Hampshire

4. Sex Name
F Margery HARDY (AFN:FZC5-SD)
Born: Abt 1782 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 1824 Place:

5. Sex Name
M Sullivan HARDY (AFN:FZC5-PV)
Born: 8 Sep 1779 Place: , , New Hampshire
Died: 28 Feb 1843 Place: , , New Hampshire
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestral file on July 15, 2002 -

Mary SULIVAN (AFN: FZC5-MJ)
Sex: F Family
Event(s):
Birth: 1752

<, , New Hampshire>
Death: 1827

Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN (AFN: FZC6-LH) Family
Mother: Margery (SULLIVAN) (AFN: FZC6-MN)
Marriage(s):

Spouse: Theophilus (Twin) HARDY (AFN: FZ6G-8C) Family
Marriage: 4 May 1768
, , New Hampshire
_______________________________


10. Captain Moses Ebenezer Sullivan(John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born 3 Oct 1753 in Berwick, Maine or Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He died 3 Jun 1799 in South Carolina or Sullivan County.

Timeline of Moses Ebenezer (sometimes Eben) Sullivan -

1753 or 3 Oct 1754 - Ebenezer born in Berwick, Maine or Massachusetts or New Hampshire

1758 - Mary Parker, Ebenezer's second wife, born in South Carolina?

1773 Ebenezer's older brother John was released from having to help his brother with his accademic
pursuits.

18 Feb 1773 - Ebenezer (age 20 or 21) married to Abigail Cotton

ABT. 1774 or 1775? - John Sullivan, Ebenezer's (age about 21 or 22) son, born in Berwick, Maine

ABT. 1774 or 1775? (more likely to be after 1778??) - Ebenezer (about age 22 or 23) married to Mary
Parker in Charleston, South Carolina

May to December, 1775 - Ebenezer (age 22 or 23) is Captain of Scammon?s Massachusetts Regiment

1775 - Captain Wood was soon after promoted to Major - Ebenezer Sullivan (age 22 or 23) , a brother
of General John, succeeded him in command

June 17,1775 - Ebenezer (age 22 or 23) fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill

1st January, 1776 - Ebenezer (age 23 or 24) is Captain 15th Continental Infantry

March 17, 1776 (age 23 or 24) - fighting that day was Captain Ebenezer Sullivan, whose brothers
James would become governor of Massachusetts and John, a general in Washington's Army, would
force English troops to evacuate Boston on March 17, 1776

20th May, 1776 - Ebenezer (age 23 or 24) taken prisoner at the Cedars

1776 - Ebenezer (age 23 or 24) taken prisoner by the Indians of Canada, held as prisoner for some
time and experienced suffering and cruelty at their hands but finally escaped. He was held as a
hostage by the Indians and rescued from burning at the stake by a British officer

1778 - Ebenezer (age 25 or 26) is exchanged

1778 - When released Ebenzer was aide to his brother Gen. John Sullivan in the Rhode Island campaign

??? when??? - Nehemiah Sullivan, Ebenezer's and Mary Parker's son born possibly in Salem County,
New Jersey or Charleston, South Carolina or Maine or New Hampshire ??

??? when??? - William Sullivan, Ebenezer's and Mary Parker's son born possibly in Salem County, New
Jersey or Charleston, South Carolina or Maine or New Hampshire ??

??? when??? - David Sullivan, Ebenezer's and Mary Parker's son born possibly in Salem County, New

??? when??? - David Sullivan, Ebenezer's and Mary Parker's son born possibly in Salem County, New
Jersey or Charleston, South Carolina or Maine or New Hampshire ??

11 Apr 1782 - Parker Sullivan, Ebenezer's (age 29 or 30) and Mary Parker's son, born in New Jersey or
possibly elsewhere?

1790 - Ebenezer (age 37 or 38) found on the Berwick, York, Maine Census with 2 Free White Males of
16 years and upward including heads of families, 1 Free White Male under 16 years, 4 Free White
Females including heads of families

1799 - Ebenezer (age 46 or 47) dies and is buried in Charlestown, South Carolina (possibly Charlestown,
New Hampshire)
___________________________________

Ebenezer Sullivan found in:
Genealogical Records: New York, 1675-1920
Event: Lived in: 1776
Comments: Captain Source title: Force, Peter
Source: American Archives (Series), 1774-1777 - Excerpts
Publisher: Peter Force
Publication Information: Washington, DC
Page: 639 Province: New York
______________________________

<http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=006145&...=
First%20Census%20of%20the%20U.S.%2C%201790%20-%20Maine&CD=523>
Genealogical Records: Maine & New Hampshire Settlers, 1600s-1900s
First Census of the U.S., 1790 - Maine, York County, Page 55
Ebenezer Sullivan last column on the right . . .
Ebenezer Sullivan last column on the right . . .
Free White Males of 16 years and upward including heads of families- 2
Free White Males under 16 years - 1
Free White Females including heads of famililes- 4
All other free persons - na
Slaves - na
_____________________________

Taken from http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/1127/1127_39.html... -

History of Nathan Lord of Kittery, ME
Page 39
Rev. Wentworth5 Lord, born September 14, 1755; baptized October 7, 1756; married February
1777, to Patience Brackett; wife born August 6, 1754, and died February 8, 1841; he died at
Parsonsfield, Me., February 28, 1845. He had "approbation to preach," 1791, ordained an
evangelist, August, 1803; in 1806 was pastor of a church, continuing till 1830, and then had an
assistant, being service pastor till 1835, assisted by Revs. S. Tyler, Parker, L. Fogg, and Wm. N.
Nason; succeeded by Rev. Chas. H. Green; his church was in Parsonsfield, Me.; organized in
1792, by Rev. Levi Chadbourne; he lived on Middle Road, half a mile east of village. Wentworth
Lord was a Revolutionary soldier, enlisted, December 30, 1775, in Capt. Ebenezer Sullivan's
company, Col. Patterson regiment, and was discharged at Trenton or Princeton, N. J., January 1,
1777; in 1776 was captured by British and Indians, in company with Philip Dore, after eight days
escaped, nearly naked and found their way to Ticonderoga, where he obtained a furlough and
returned to Berwick, Me.; taken with small pox on his way home; rejoined his regiment at
Ticonderoga; present at the Battle of the Cedars, capture of the Hessians at Trenton, of Burgoyne
at Stillwater.
_________________________________________


Taken from http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/1127/1127_41.html...

History of Nathan Lord of Kittery, ME
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, BOSTON, Dec. 12, 1896.
I certify the foregoing to be true abstract from the Record Index to the Revolutionary Archive
deposited in this office.
Witness the Seal of the Commonwealth,
(SEAL) WM. M. OLIN.
Receipt
Received August 28, 1778, of Doc. Sol. Warren an abstract for the biliting money belonging to the
company I commanded in the year 1776. Lieut. Lord having been ordered to deliver said account
into my hand.
EBEN SULLIVAN.
Certificate
This may certifie that Lieut. Lord has this day delivered into my hands by order of General
Patterson the accounts of the company I had command of in the year 1776 in Col. John Patterson's
Regiment whereby the said Lieut. Lord is discharged from being accountable to any officer or soldier
for any demand for service in said company and I myself am henceforth accountable to all officers and
soldiers belonging to said company for using such demands. Witness my hand August 3d, 1778.

EBENEZER SULLIVAN, CAPT.

Nathan Lord, 5th, was in an "expedition into Canada." With others he was captured near Fort
Cedar, near Ticonderoga. He was tied to a tree and torture had begun, but an English officer named
James Edwin Park Stanhope interfered, paid a ransom to the Indians, and aided in exchanging him.

In 1791, Captain Lord bought the eighth part of a ship (brigantine) Friendship, which he sailed until its
capture by the French. He also sailed the brig Betsey, also taken January 29, 1793. This vessel was
owned by himself and Col. Jonathan Hamilton and named after Mrs. Lord.
______________________________________

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=005271&...=
Immigrants%20to%20New%20England%2C%201700-1775&CD=504

Genealogical Records: Early New England Settlers, 1600s-1800s
page 192, Immigrants to New England, 1700 - 1775

Sullivan, John, of Berwick, Maine; from Limerick, Ireland, cir 1783; b. Limerick, Ireland, 1692; school
master; m. Margery Browne, of Cork, in 1735, b. 1714, d 1801; Children: Benjamin, Daniel, John (the
Major General in the Revolution), James (Governor of Massachusetts), Mary, Ebenezer. - N.E. Hist.
Gen. Reg., Vol 1, p. 376, Amory's John Sullivan of Berwick, p. 149.
_____________________________

Taken from http://james_clan.tripod.com/d0001/g0000008.html#I3832 -

Ebenezer Moses SULLIVAN
[N570]
3 Oct 1753 - 3 Jun 1799
* BIRTH: 3 Oct 1753, Berwick, , Massachusetts (Maine)
* DEATH: 3 Jun 1799, Charlestown, , SC
Father: Owen O'SULLIVAN
Mother: Margery BROWNE

Family 1 : Abigail COTTON
* MARRIAGE: 18 Feb 1773
1. John SULLIVAN
__________________________________


Taken from http://www.jonsullivan.com/osullivan/jcsullivan/chap12.htm

Ebenezer, b 3 Oct 1754 Mass. m Abigail Cotton. Capt of Scammon?s Massachusetts Regiment, May to
December, 1775; Captain 15th Continental Infantry, 1st January, 1776; taken prisoner at the Cedars,
20th May, 1776; exchanged in 1778. Died 3 Jun 1799 SC.
_________________________________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva...

He was re-elected governor in 1809 and died December 4th of that year. James had four brothers,
Benjamin, an officer in the British Navy who was lost at sea before the Revolution; Daniel
who was a captain in the Revolutionary War and the founder of the town of Sullivan in the State of
Maine; John, already men- tioned, Who was a major general in the Continental army and Gov-
ernor of New Hampshire; and Ebenezer, an officer in the Revo- lution and a lawyer in Berwick, Maine.
He had one sister, Mary, who married Theophilus Hardy.
__________________________________________

Taken from http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/me/york/berwick/sulliva... -

The first problem that confronted the court was how to quickly assemble a law library for their use the
possession of which was an absolute necessity. They could not very well order one from
London. The lawyers of the colony who had turned their backs upon the patriots and remained loyal to
the crown were of the high class of attorneys who owned valuable libraries. They had fled,
many of them going to England and in their haste had left their law books behind. These were
promptly confiscated and purchased from the new government by the new court. Eben Sullivan the
younger brother of James as well as his older brother John, one of the famous generals of the
Revolution was now captain of a company that he had raised at Berwick of which Nathan Lord was
lieutenant. This company had been in the engagement at Bunker's Hill. He was in the Canadian
expedition and was at one time taken prisoner by the Indians of Canada, held as prisoner for some
time and experienced suffering and cruelty at their hands but finally escaped.
________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.rootsweb.com/~mecberwi/ber_rev.txt -

A List of REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS
OF BERWICK. Compiled from the Records of the Town by W. C. SPENCER. 898.

Berwick is destined to be a place of historical interest. The number of persons tracing their family lines
within its limits is surprising, and it will not be deemed presumptuous to say, that there is hardly a
person of ancient American descent in New England, who does not include in his ancestry the name of
some settler or early resident of the original town of this name. To aid those who are making historical
and genealogical enquiries, this list of Revolutionary soldiers has been prepared from the town records.
A tribute to the citizen soldiers of Berwick is the following: "To their everlasting honor be it said that
they have furnished as many men, according to their number of inhabitants, as any town in the country.
There are but a few ancient homesteads in the town,
that are not honored by the grave of some Revolutionary soldier."

During the Revolution two full companies were raised in Berwick. They were commanded by Captain
Philip Hubbard and Daniel Wood. Captain Wood was soon after promoted to Major, and Ebenezer
Sullivan, a brother of General John, succeeded him in command. More than one hundred from the two
companies were minute men, who were enlisted May 5, 1775, and remained in the army throughout
the entire struggle. The town sent sixteen soldiers to Dorchester Heights.
_______________________________________________

Taken from http://www.irishheritagetrail.com/bunkerhillmonument.htm -

CHARLESTOWN MONUMENTS

BUNKER HILL MONUMENT Monument Avenue, Charlestown (1743)


<http://www.irishheritagetrail.com/images/BunkerHillMonument....; The English won the Battle of
Bunker Hill on June 17,1775, but the battle marked the point where "British tyranny ended and
American liberty began." The colonists who died at Bunker Hill included English, Scots, Irish and
Africans, a melting pot of future citizens of the nation.

Of the New England militiamen who rushed to Charlestown to defend Boston Harbor, 176 were Irish-
born, and hundreds more were born of Irish parents. Historian Michael J. O'Brien notes there were
seven Irish officers and dozens of Irish-American officers, including Colonel John Stark of New
Hampshire, one of the heroes of the day-long conflict. Major Andrew McClary of Epson, New Hampshire,
whose parents were from Tyrone, was killed at the very end of the battle after fighting bravely
throughout the day. Also fighting that day was Captain Ebenezer Sullivan, whose brothers James would
become governor of Massachusetts and John, a general in Washington's Army, would force English
troops to evacuate Boston on March 17, 1776.

<http://www.irishheritagetrail.com/images/bunkerhillmon_plaqu...; On June 17, 1825
Revolutionary War hero Marquis De Lafayette laid the corner stone for the Memorial and Daniel
Webster gave the oration. The 221 foot monument, with a 30 foot base was formally unveiled on
Saturday, June 17, 1843. US President Zachary Tyler and his cabinet attended the ceremony.

In the 19th century Charlestown increasing became an Irish neighborhood, with a strong contingent of
families who settled here from Donegal and today continues to have a significant Irish-American
population.

The Monument is open every day of the year except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day. It is
administered by the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
_________________________________________________

Taken from http://www.worcesterfamily.com/fifth-2.htm -

No. V-76
PHILIP WORCESTER (Samuel4, Thomas3, Moses2, William1). bpt Berwick, Me., May, 1754, d Acton,
Me., Nov. 25, 1817; m Berwick, Dec. 24, 1778, Ann Ringe, b Apr. 8, 1762, d Sept. 27, 1824, at Acton,
Me. Resided Berwick, Me., Portsmouth, NH, and Acton, Me. Fifer in Capt. Ebenezer Sullivan's Company,
Col. James Scammon's Regt. In service at Cambridge, Mass., May to August, 1775.

No. V-82
MOSES WORSTER (Thomas4, Thomas3, Moses2, William1). bpt. Sept. 9, 1744; m1st ____; m2d Mrs.
Susannah (Nash) Knowles, Mar. 30, 1805. Moved to Pleasant River, Me., some time after May 2, 1763,
as on this date he witnessed a deed from Gowen Wilson to Joseph Wilson at Falmouth or vicinity. He
was living in Pleasant River on May 2, 1769 when he served as one of the appraisers of personal estate
of Gowen Wilson. He is credited with several periods of service during the Revolutionary War. He
enlisted Sept. 9, 1775, in Capt. Francis Shaw?s Co. and served 4 mos., 1 day, Company stationed at
Gouldsborough, No. 4 Narraguagus (Cherryfield, Me.) and Pleasant River for the defense of the sea
coast. He also enlisted Aug. 9, 1777, in Capt. Reuben Dyer?s Comp. Raised for the expedition against St.
Johns, N.S., continued in service at Machias for its defense, and dismissed on Dec. 6, 1777. He also
entered into service again on Oct. 27, 1780 in Capt. Sullivan?s Company, ordered out by Col. John Allen
to protect the inhabitants of Frenchmans Bay. Discharged on Nov. 14, 1780. On Apr. 27, 1778, he is
listed among the 213 inhabitants (as a family of 8) of #6 West of Machias, Me. Susannah was living as
late as 1836 when she signed a deed releasing her dower rights.
________________________________________

Taken from - http://www.rootsquest.com/~usgwnhus/archive/nhqry97.htm

Larry Nicodemus Fri, 29 Aug 1997
SULLIVAN
Hon. Isaac Newton Sullivan, whose high professional attainments are attested by the fact that for
twenty-six years he was a member of the Idaho supreme court, serving for eleven years of that period

as chief justice, is now giving his attention to the private practice of law as a senior partner in the firm
of Sullivan & Sullivan of Boise. He was born in Delaware county, Iowa, November 3, 1848, a son of
Aaron Sullivan, who was born in Logan county, Ohio, near Urbana, where he was reared, educated and
married. He was a representative of one of the old families of New Hampshire and its believed that
from the same ancestry came John Sullivan, who was a delegate from New Hampshire to the first
continental congress at Philadelphia in 1774. Aaron Sullivan devoted his life to farming and stock
raising. He married Jane Lippincott, who was also a native of Logan county, Ohio, the wedding being
celebrated in 1838. They began their domestic life in their native county but in 1844 removed
westward to Delaware county, Iowa, where their remaining days were passed. They were early settlers
of that locality and for many years were rated among its most substantial and valued citizen. The
mother passed away in 1887 and the father, who was born February, 21, 1811, died in 1894 at the
venerable age of eighty-three years. He was a well-to-do farmer of Delaware county and at one time
owned about a section of land. The close connection of the family with the representatives of that
name in New Hampshire comes through John Sullivan, the paternal grandfather, who was born in the
Old Granite state, while his parents came to the new world from the north of Ireland and were of
Scotch-Irish descent.
___________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, Ebenezer
Birth Date: 175? Birth Place: New Hampshire
Volume: 172 Page Number: 53
Reference: Rolls of the soldiers in the Rev. War, 1775 to May, 1777; and diaries of Lt. Jona Burton,
Ed. By Issac Weare Hammond, v. 1 of War Rolls, NH. 1885. (13,3,) 799p.) Rolls of the soldiers in the
Rev. War May 1777 to 1780: with names of NH. Men in Ms. regiments. V.2 of War Rolls. Concord, NH.
1886. (14,2,847p.), Rolls and documents relating to soldiers in the Rev. War, including some Indian
and French rolls. V.3 of War Rolls. Manchester, NH. 1887. (10,2, 1021p.), Rolls and documents relating
to soldiers in the Rev. War. Pt.11. Misc. Provincial papers from 1629 to 1725. V. 4 of War Rolls.
Machester, NH. 1889. (22,2,819p.):2:749

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, Ebenezer
Birth Date: 175? Birth Place: Massachusetts,
Volume: 172 Page Number: 53
Biographical Info: capt.
Reference: soldiers and sailors of the Rev. War. Comp. By secy. Of the commonwealth, Ms. Boston.
1896-1908. (17v.):15:246

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, Ebenezer
Birth Date: 175? Birth Place: Maine
Volume: 172 Page Number: 53
Reference: Heads of fams. At the first U.S. census. Me. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington,
1908. (105p.):55

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, Ebenezer
Birth Date: 174? Birth Place: New Hampshire
Volume: 172 Page Number: 53
Reference: Gen. Column of the " Boston Transcript". 1906-1941.( The greatest single source of
material for gen. Data for the N.E. area and for the period 1600-1800. Completely indexed in the Index.
): 13 Feb 1901, 4587; 8 May 1901, 4742



Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, Ebenezer
Birth Date: 174? Birth Place: Massachusetts,
Volume: 172 Page Number: 53
Biographical Info: capt.
Reference: Historical reg. of officers of the Continental Army. By Francis Bernard Heitman.
Washington, DC, 1914. (685p.):527

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 --

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I22391
* Name: EBENEZER SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 30 OCT 1750
* Birth: 1753 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
* Death: 3 JUN 1799 in Charleston, SC
* Note:
WFT Vol. 24, Ed. 1, Tree #2903

Ebenezer was a Capt and Major in the Revolutionary War and, afterwards, practiced law in S. Berwick,
ME

Ebenezer was to study medicine but his "Inclinations and Genius" led him in other directions and in
1773 his older brother John was released from having to help his brother with his accademic pursuits.

Found on Mormoms International Genealogical Index : father of Parker Sullivan born April 11, 1782.

Father: John Sullivan b: 17 JUN 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery Brown b: 1714 in Cork, Ireland

Marriage 1 MARY PARKER b: BET. 1735 - 1761

* Married: in Salem County, New Jersey
* Married: ABT. 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina

Children

1. [Has No Children] Nehemiah Sullivan b: in Salem County, New Jersey
2. [Has No Children] David Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Charleston, South Carolina
3. [Has No Children] William Sullivan b: ABT. 1777 in Charleston, South Carolina
4. [Has Children] PARKER SULLIVAN b: 11 APR 1782 in Salem County, New Jersey

Marriage 2 Abigail Cotton b: WFT Est. 1735-1759

* Married: WFT Est. 1764-1791

Children

1. [Has Children] John Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Berwick, ME

______________________________________________

Taken from the IGI on July 13, 2002:

Ebenezer SULLIVAN

Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 1753
Berwick, York, Maine
Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN
Mother: Lydia WORCESTER
____________________________

Taken from the IGI on July 13, 2002:

Ebenezer SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 3 Oct 1753
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Parents:
Relatives:
Walter Scott SULLIVAN
________________________________

Taken from the IGI on July 13, 2002:

Ebenezer SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 1753
Berwick, York, Maine
Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN
Mother: Lydia WORCESTER
_______________________________

Taken from the IGI on July 13, 2002:

Ebenezer <SULLIVAN>
Sex: U
Event(s):
Birth: 1753
Of, Berwick, York, Maine
Parents:
Father: John SULLIVAN
Mother: Margery BROWNE SULLIVAN
___________________________________
Taken from the IGI on July 13, 2002:

Ebenezer SULLIVAN
Sex: M
Event(s):
Birth: 3 Oct 1753
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Parents:
Relatives:
David D. Sullivan
_________________________________-


Possible parent of Parker Sullivan document of DAR referenced Mormon genealogy sheet found on
website at:
<http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/ebenezer_sulli....
jpg>
_________________________________________

http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/Aaron_Sullivan...
Ebenezer Sullivan was born 3 October 1753 in Berwick, York, Maine. Died 3 June 1799 in Charleston,
Charleston, South Carolina. Married Abigail or Abagail Cotton in New Hampshire/Maine. Married Mary
Parker in South Carolina.__Mary Parker born about 1758 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina.
__Children with Mary Parker: David Sullivan born about 1775 in Charleston, Charleston, South
Carolina, Williams Sullivan born about 1777 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, and (possibly)
Parker Sullivan born 11 April 1782 probably in Salem County, New Jersey.
_______________________________________

Taken from the SAR of Illinois website on July 13, 2002 -

167 Alexander McGregor Stewart Capt. Moses Ebenezer Sullivan, Maine, Aid-de-Camp to his
bro. Gen John Sullivan

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution, 17 Vols.

Volume 15
page 246
Sullivan, Ebenezer, Berwick.Captain, Col. Scammon's regt.; regimental return dated Cambridge, May 23,
1775; ordered in Provincial Congress May 29, 1775, that comm issions be delivered to captains of said
regiment; also, Captain, Col. James Scammon's (30th) regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; engaged
May 5, 1775; service, 3 mos. 3 days; also, company return [probably Oct., 1775], including abstract of
pay to last of July, 1775; engaged May 2, 1775.
_________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

MILITARY COLLECTOR AND HISTORIAN
Persi Code: AMMC
Topics: US
Issues Per Year: 4x
ISSN Number:
ACPL Holdings: v.1-2,4-6,10-12,14-1949-
ACPL Call
Number:
Other Titles:
old title: MILITARY UNIFORMS IN AMERICAN
Repositories: Allen County Public Library
State H istorical Society of Wisconsin Library
Publisher: Company of Military Historians
Address: N. Main St: Westbrook, CT 06498

State Historical Society of Wisconsin
Library
816 State St
Madison, WI 53706
________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -


Revolutionary War Service Records, 1775-83
SULLIVAN, EBENEZER
Rank - Induction: Capt
Roll Box: 122
Roll Description: Continental Troops

SULLIVAN, EBENEZER
Rank - Induction: Captain
Roll Box: 42
Roll Description: MA
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

Irish in Boston
ebenezer sullivan
The Irish in Boston
Chapter VII The Irish Soldier, II Bunker Hill
Page 92

The following names are found among those on the rolls of Bunker Hill, as given in the Massachusetts
Archives:

2d lieutenant Chas. Dougherty
Capt. Samuel Dunn
Col. John Patterson
Ebenezer Sullivan
Lieut. Joseph Welsh
John Burk
John Barry
Joseph Barry
Walt Burk
Till Burk
Richard Burk
Michael Berry
William Burk
Josiah Burk
Edward Burk
Thomas Burn
John Bogan
William Bogan
Joseph Burne
John Hryan
Arthur Collamore
Samuel Carr
John Collins
Edward Connor
David Collins
Peter Collins
Daniel Collins
Sergt. Hugh Cargill
Col. John Nixon
______________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -



American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
S
Fifteenth Virginia
page 527
Sullivan, Ebenezer (Mass). Captain of S cammon's Massachusetts Regiment, May to December, 1775;
Captain 15th Continental Infantry, 1st January, 1776; taken prisoner at the Cedars, 20th May, 1776;
exchanged ?, 1778. (Died 1799.)
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

Civil War Service Records

Surname/Given Name/Middle Initial/Company Unit/Rank - Induction/Rank - Discharge/Notes/
Allegiance

Sullivan Ebenezer E 3 West Virginia Cavalry. Private Private
Union
____________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1790usfedcen&a...;
3%2c39;6%2c42;13%2ccvwrmr;1%2c&gsfn=ebenezer&gsln=sullivan&sx=&prox=1&gsco=1&gspl=1&
year=&yearend=&gskw=&ti=0&submit.x=57&submit.y=10&gss=angs&GS=SULLIVAN+EBENEZER

Census Record for 1790 - Berwick, Maine -

Ebenezer Sullivan - 2 -1 -4
_______________________________________

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 128 page 171
[p.171] Mrs. Jennie Curran Everson.
DAR ID Number: 127517
Born in Providence, R. I.
Wife of Charles Grant Everson.
Descendant of Capt. Ebenezer Sullivan, as follows:
1. John C. Curran (1845-1910) m. 1867 Martha A. Rogers (b. 1852).
2. David Moore Rogers (1802-59) m. 2d 1845 Susanna Nickerson Jackson (1813-78).
3. Robert Rodgers (Rogers) (d. 1830) m. 1797 Margery Sullivan (b. 1774).
4. Ebenezer Sullivan m. 1773 Abigail Cotton.
Ebenezer Sullivan (1753-99) commanded a company in the Massachusetts troops. He was born in
Berwick, Maine; died in Charleston, S. C.

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 128 page 171
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 38
page 125
Mrs. Zoulie Sullivan Ewing.
DAR ID Number: 36355
Born in Havre de Grace, Maryland.

Wife of Dr. John H. Ewing.
Descendant of Capt. Moses Ebenezer Sullivan.
Daughter of James Tennant Sullivan and Harriet Elliott, his wife.
Granddaughter of William Sullivan and Mary Russell, his wife.
Gr.-granddaughter of Moses Ebenezer Sullivan and Mary Parker, his wife.
Moses Ebenezer Sullivan, (1753-99), commanded a company in the Canadian campaign and
was captured at The Cedars. He was held as a hostage by the Indians and rescued from
burning at the stake by a British officer. When released he was aide to his brother Gen. John
Sullivan in the Rhode Island campaign, 1778. He was born in Berwick, Me., and died in the
Carolinas.
Also Nos. 4323, 6123, 26776.
___________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on January 6, 2002 -

Census record found an Ebenezer Sullivan in Maine in 1790.

Ebenezer Sullivan

State: ME
Year: 1790
County: York
Roll: M637_2
Township: Berwick
Page: 55
Image: 0119

American Biographical Library
The Biographical Cyclopædia of American Women
Volume II
Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution
Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army
S
Fifteenth Virginia
page 527
Sullivan, Ebenezer (Mass). Captain of Scammon's Massachusetts Regiment, May to
December, 1775; Captain 15th Continental Infantry, 1st January, 1776; taken
prisoner at the Cedars, 20th May, 1776; exchanged ?, 1778. (Died 1799.)


Moses married (1) Mary Parkerprobably before 1775. Mary was born Abt. 1758 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina or Sullivan County.

Taken from ancestral file on July 13, 2002 -

Mary PARKER
Sex: F
Event(s):
Birth: Abt. 1758
Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina
Marriage(s):
Spouse: Ebenezer SULLIVAN
Source Information:
Film Number: 445753
Page Number:
Reference Number: 68114
_______________________________


_______________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I00458
* Name: MARY PARKER
* Sex: F
* Birth: BET. 1735 - 1761
* Death: BET. 1785 - 1849

Marriage 1 EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.

* Married: in Salem County, New Jersey
* Married: ABT. 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina

Children

1. [Has No Children] Nehemiah Sullivan b: in Salem County, New Jersey
2. [Has No Children] David Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Charleston, South Carolina
3. [Has No Children] William Sullivan b: ABT. 1777 in Charleston, South Carolina
4. [Has Children] PARKER SULLIVAN b: 11 APR 1782 in Salem County, New Jersey

______________________________________________

Possible parent of Parker Sullivan document of DAR referenced Mormon genealogy sheet found on
website at:
<http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/ebenezer_sulli....
jpg>
_________________________________________

http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/Aaron_Sullivan...
Ebenezer Sullivan was born 3 October 1753 in Berwick, York, Maine. Died 3 June 1799 in Charleston,
Charleston, South Carolina. Married Abigail or Abagail Cotton in New Hampshire/Maine. Married Mary
Parker in South Carolina.__Mary Parker born about 1758 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina.
__Children with Mary Parker: David Sullivan born about 1775 in Charleston, Charleston, South
Carolina, Williams Sullivan born about 1777 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, and (possibly)
Parker Sullivan born 11 April 1782 probably in Salem County, New Jersey.
_______________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 38
page 125
Mrs. Zoulie Sullivan Ewing.
DAR ID Number: 36355
Born in Havre de Grace, Maryland.
Wife of Dr. John H. Ewing.
Descendant of Capt. Moses Ebenezer Sullivan.
Daughter of James Tennant Sullivan and Harriet Elliott, his wife.
Granddaughter of William Sullivan and Mary Russell, his wife.
Gr.-granddaughter of Moses Ebenezer Sullivan and Mary Parker, his wife.
Moses Ebenezer Sullivan, (1753-99), commanded a company in the Canadian campaign and
was captured at The Cedars. He was held as a hostage by the Indians and rescued from
burning at the stake by a British officer. When released he was aide to his brother Gen. John

Sullivan in the Rhode Island campaign, 1778. He was born in Berwick, Me., and died in the
Carolinas.
Also Nos. 4323, 6123, 26776.
___________________________________________


Moses and Mary had the following children:

+ 35 M i. Parker Sullivanwas born 11 Apr 1782. He died 22 Aug 1852.

36 M ii. David Sullivanwas born Abt 1790 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/showimage.cgi?y...=
434&pg=288

**NOT Possible David Sullivan**
1850 Census Roll 434, Page 288

David Sullivan - 22 - M - Laborer
Julia - 22 - F
__________________________________

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/6341/6341_1840.ht...=
1027490189

**Possible David Sullivan**
1850 ME Census Index
Sullivan, David ME Washington Pembrooke 1850 273 77
__________________________________

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/showimage.cgi?y...=
270&pg=83

1850 Census Roll 270, Page 83
Sullivan, David ME Waldo Frankfort 1850 270 83
**Possible David Sullivan**

1850 Census Records -
David Sullivan age 70 - M - Farmer - Place of birth Maine
Susanna Sullivan age 73 - F
George R age 31 - M
Mary C age 21 - F
David R age 1 - M
Joanna M age 19 - F
___________________________________

Possible parent of Parker Sullivan document of DAR referenced Mormon genealogy
sheet found on website at:
<http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/ebenezer_sulli...
_to_parker_sullivan.jpg>
_________________________________________

http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/Aaron_Sullivan...
Ebenezer Sullivan was born 3 October 1753 in Berwick, York, Maine. Died 3 June
1799 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina. Married Abigail or Abagail Cotton in
New Hampshire/Maine. Married Mary Parker in South Carolina.__Mary Parker born
about 1758 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina.__Children with Mary Parker:
David Sullivan born about 1775 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, Williams
Sullivan born about 1777 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, and (possibly)
Parker Sullivan born 11 April 1782 probably in Salem County, New Jersey.

Sullivan born about 1777 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, and (possibly)
Parker Sullivan born 11 April 1782 probably in Salem County, New Jersey.
_______________________________________


37 M iii. William Sullivanwas born Abt 1791 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina.

Possible parent of Parker Sullivan document of DAR referenced Mormon genealogy
sheet found on website at:
<http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/ebenezer_sulli...
_to_parker_sullivan.jpg>
_________________________________________

http://www.geocities.com/sullivanangie_spider/Aaron_Sullivan...
Ebenezer Sullivan was born 3 October 1753 in Berwick, York, Maine. Died 3 June
1799 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina. Married Abigail or Abagail Cotton in
New Hampshire/Maine. Married Mary Parker in South Carolina.__Mary Parker born
about 1758 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina.__Children with Mary Parker:
David Sullivan born about 1775 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, Williams
Sullivan born about 1777 in Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, and (possibly)
Parker Sullivan born 11 April 1782 probably in Salem County, New Jersey.
_______________________________________


38 M iv. Nehemiah Sullivanwas born Abt 1783/1791.

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/wizard_results.cgi?Category...;
UsearchID=904378a301ff14b919232873UcaWTB&FN=Nehemiah&MN=&LN=Sullivan&
BDATE=&BLOCATION=&DDATE=&DLOCATION=&SL=&SURNAMEONLY=&TYPE=
Single&FILE=&IND=&GROUPIND=&GROUPINDNAME=&TREESEARCH=&FILTER=240

Matches in Marriage Index: New Jersey

Nehemiah Sullivan found in:
Marriage Index: New Jersey, 1680-1900
Married: Oct. 16, 1803 in: Salem, NJ
Gender: M Source: County Clerk Records Film
number: 0848572
Spouse name: Tracy, Margaret Spouse gender: F
___________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 90491 Updated: Tue Jul 9 19:40:12 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock
<alcock@cox-internet.com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I00458
* Name: MARY PARKER
* Sex: F
* Birth: BET. 1735 - 1761
* Death: BET. 1785 - 1849

Marriage 1 EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.

* Married: in Salem County, New Jersey
* Married: ABT. 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina

Children


Children

1. [Has No Children] Nehemiah Sullivan b: in Salem County, New Jersey
2. [Has No Children] David Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Charleston, South Carolina
3. [Has No Children] William Sullivan b: ABT. 1777 in Charleston, South Carolina
4. [Has Children] PARKER SULLIVAN b: 11 APR 1782 in Salem County, New Jersey

______________________________________________

More date with reference to Parker and Mary Johns Sullivan

Miss Alice Longfellow, 332 North 10th Ave., Broken Bow, Nebraska wrote the
following to the compiler:

"Parker Sullivan and Joseph Hewling (Hueling, Huling) married sisters and in the
History of Champaign County, Ohio (1881) I found this article which may be of
interest to you "Joseph Hewling, farmer, West Liberty Ohio, born Harrison Township,
is the son of Joseph and Margaret Hewling, both natives of New Jersey. Joseph could
have entered the Revolutionary War, but was exempt on account of an infirmity,
caused by sickness. In 1796 he married Margaret Johns. She was an own cousin of
Commodore Perry. Came to Ohio in 1800, located near Cincinnati at Waynesville,
moved in 1801 or 1802 to Champaign County, Ohio."

It is doubtful that there is the relationship to Commodore Perry, I wrote to Dr.
Edward Cornelius Perry, MD, Avon New York who had done fifty years of genealogical
work and he had this to say (letter dated April 14, 1943)

"I have compiled 11 lines of Perrys, and have that of Commodore Perry and his
brother Com. M. C. Perry but do not find the names that you mention. Com O. H.
Perry was born 1785 and died 1819, married 1811, Elizabeth Champlin Mason. His
brother Com. M. C. Perry was born 1794, died 1858, married 1814, Jane Slidell. The
children of these two Commodore Perrys were own, or 1st cousins. Com. O.H. Perry
had five children, Com. MC Perry had ten children, none of these fifteen children bore
names that you give neither do I see such names among the eight children of Captain
Christopher R. Perry, father of the two Commodores, nor any of their immediate
descendants. I am on the Richard Perry line of Fairfield, Connecticutt 1649. The line
of the two Commodores is that of Edward Perry born 1625 of Sandwich, Mass. I
have seen authoritative statement that he has no cousins now living in own, or 1st
cousin, or descendents."

Parker Sullivan may have come from north of Ireland, and when a young man
emigrated to New Jersey. Such is the account in the History of Idaho Chicago Lewis
Publishing Co., 1899) page 182 on article on Isaac N. Sullivan. This history also says
that he was married in New Jersey and at an early day moved to Ohio, locating in
Logan County near Degraff. He had seven children, born in New jersey and Ohio and
reared and educated in Ohio. The history is somewhat confused and must be in error
as it says that his paternal grandfather Aaron Sullivan did this (Note: The census of
1850 Champaign County Ohio states that Parker Sullivan was born in New Jersey.)
And then the context goes on to say that the third of this family was Aaron Sullivan,
father of the Judge I N. Sullivan. They probably assumed that the Judge's granfather
had the same name as his father, but our data indicates that he was one Parker
Sullivan who married Mary Johns, and the records of New Jersey Salem County shows
their marriage. It is possible that Parker or his parents came from the North of
Ireland, but just who the parents of Parker were I have not been able to determine.
Mr. Lewis D. Cook of the Pennsylvania Genealogical Society has done soem work on
this for me. He found a Parker Sullivan who married Mary Ann Whittall, in a
mortgage dated September 11, 1773, and recorded in Salem County, Book A, p. 72

of mortgages. It shows there that Parker Sullivan and wife Mary and Sarah Whittall
Wheaton Conveyed to Joseph Champneys as security for the loan. " all that lot of
land that was devised to William Whittall, deceased, by the last will and testament of
Eramus Fetters, deceased." It seems that this is the only instance of the name Parker
Sullivan in the index books of Salem County, New Jersey; the mortgages began in
1765 and the deeds about 1795.

The Institute of American genealogy in a letter addressed to me and dated May 13,
1942 has this to say on the matter: " In spite of the fact that te Census of 1790 for
New Jersey was destroyed by fire, there are many other angles of approach. For
instance the Probate records show a Sullivan family resident in Salem County, NJ in
1765. A Matthias Sullivan lived there and his will shows sons John and Matthias.
John was born 1762, and Matthias, the son in 1765. We find a Parker family in the
same county. We believe work should be concentrated here until all possibilities of
Parker Sullivans parentage are exhausted. The marriage records of Parker Sullivan to
Mary Johns, Sept. 1, 1804 appears on page 176 of Salem County, NJ Marriage
Records. There is also record of a Nehemiah Sullivan who married 1803 Margaret
Tracy. Probably Nehemiah and Parker are brothers. Many of the New Jersey
pulications contain data on this county.


Nehemiah married Margaret Tracy1803 in Salem, New Jersey.

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/wizard_results.cgi?Category...;
UsearchID=904378a301ff14b919232873UcaWTB&FN=Nehemiah&MN=&LN=Sullivan&
BDATE=&BLOCATION=&DDATE=&DLOCATION=&SL=&SURNAMEONLY=&TYPE=
Single&FILE=&IND=&GROUPIND=&GROUPINDNAME=&TREESEARCH=&FILTER=240

Matches in Marriage Index: New Jersey

Nehemiah Sullivan found in:
Marriage Index: New Jersey, 1680-1900
Married: Oct. 16, 1803 in: Salem, NJ
Gender: M Source: County Clerk Records Film
number: 0848572
Spouse name: Tracy, Margaret Spouse gender: F
___________________________________

More date with reference to Parker and Mary Johns Sullivan

Miss Alice Longfellow, 332 North 10th Ave., Broken Bow, Nebraska wrote the
following to the compiler:

"Parker Sullivan and Joseph Hewling (Hueling, Huling) married sisters and in the
History of Champaign County, Ohio (1881) I found this article which may be of
interest to you "Joseph Hewling, farmer, West Liberty Ohio, born Harrison Township,
is the son of Joseph and Margaret Hewling, both natives of New Jersey. Joseph could
have entered the Revolutionary War, but was exempt on account of an infirmity,
caused by sickness. In 1796 he married Margaret Johns. She was an own cousin of
Commodore Perry. Came to Ohio in 1800, located near Cincinnati at Waynesville,
moved in 1801 or 1802 to Champaign County, Ohio."

It is doubtful that there is the relationship to Commodore Perry, I wrote to Dr.
Edward Cornelius Perry, MD, Avon New York who had done fifty years of genealogical
work and he had this to say (letter dated April 14, 1943)

"I have compiled 11 lines of Perrys, and have that of Commodore Perry and his
brother Com. M. C. Perry but do not find the names that you mention. Com O. H.

brother Com. M. C. Perry but do not find the names that you mention. Com O. H.
Perry was born 1785 and died 1819, married 1811, Elizabeth Champlin Mason. His
brother Com. M. C. Perry was born 1794, died 1858, married 1814, Jane Slidell. The
children of these two Commodore Perrys were own, or 1st cousins. Com. O.H. Perry
had five children, Com. MC Perry had ten children, none of these fifteen children bore
names that you give neither do I see such names among the eight children of Captain
Christopher R. Perry, father of the two Commodores, nor any of their immediate
descendants. I am on the Richard Perry line of Fairfield, Connecticutt 1649. The line
of the two Commodores is that of Edward Perry born 1625 of Sandwich, Mass. I
have seen authoritative statement that he has no cousins now living in own, or 1st
cousin, or descendents."

Parker Sullivan may have come from north of Ireland, and when a young man
emigrated to New Jersey. Such is the account in the History of Idaho Chicago Lewis
Publishing Co., 1899) page 182 on article on Isaac N. Sullivan. This history also says
that he was married in New Jersey and at an early day moved to Ohio, locating in
Logan County near Degraff. He had seven children, born in New jersey and Ohio and
reared and educated in Ohio. The history is somewhat confused and must be in error
as it says that his paternal grandfather Aaron Sullivan did this (Note: The census of
1850 Champaign County Ohio states that Parker Sullivan was born in New Jersey.)
And then the context goes on to say that the third of this family was Aaron Sullivan,
father of the Judge I N. Sullivan. They probably assumed that the Judge's granfather
had the same name as his father, but our data indicates that he was one Parker
Sullivan who married Mary Johns, and the records of New Jersey Salem County shows
their marriage. It is possible that Parker or his parents came from the North of
Ireland, but just who the parents of Parker were I have not been able to determine.
Mr. Lewis D. Cook of the Pennsylvania Genealogical Society has done soem work on
this for me. He found a Parker Sullivan who married Mary Ann Whittall, in a
mortgage dated September 11, 1773, and recorded in Salem County, Book A, p. 72
of mortgages. It shows there that Parker Sullivan and wife Mary and Sarah Whittall
Wheaton Conveyed to Joseph Champneys as security for the loan. " all that lot of
land that was devised to William Whittall, deceased, by the last will and testament of
Eramus Fetters, deceased." It seems that this is the only instance of the name Parker
Sullivan in the index books of Salem County, New Jersey; the mortgages began in
1765 and the deeds about 1795.

The Institute of American genealogy in a letter addressed to me and dated May 13,
1942 has this to say on the matter: " In spite of the fact that te Census of 1790 for
New Jersey was destroyed by fire, there are many other angles of approach. For
instance the Probate records show a Sullivan family resident in Salem County, NJ in
1765. A Matthias Sullivan lived there and his will shows sons John and Matthias.
John was born 1762, and Matthias, the son in 1765. We find a Parker family in the
same county. We believe work should be concentrated here until all possibilities of
Parker Sullivans parentage are exhausted. The marriage records of Parker Sullivan to
Mary Johns, Sept. 1, 1804 appears on page 176 of Salem County, NJ Marriage
Records. There is also record of a Nehemiah Sullivan who married 1803 Margaret
Tracy. Probably Nehemiah and Parker are brothers. Many of the New Jersey
pulications contain data on this county.



Moses married (2) Abigail Cotton18 Feb 1773.

Taken from http://james_clan.tripod.com/d0005/g0000008.html -

Abigail COTTON
____ - ____


* BIRTH: Portsmouth, , NH

Family 1 : Ebenezer Moses SULLIVAN

* MARRIAGE: 18 Feb 1773

1. John SULLIVAN
_____________________________

Taken from http://www.jonsullivan.com/osullivan/jcsullivan/chap12.htm

Ebenezer, b 3 Oct 1754 Mass. m Abigail Cotton. Capt of Scammon?s Massachusetts Regiment, May to
December, 1775; Captain 15th Continental Infantry, 1st January, 1776; taken prisoner at the Cedars,
20th May, 1776; exchanged in 1778. Died 3 Jun 1799 SC.
_________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

* ID: I22393
* Name: Abigail Cotton
* Sex: F
* Birth: WFT Est. 1735-1759
* Death: WFT Est. 1777-1830

Marriage 1 EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
* Married: WFT Est. 1764-1791

Children
1. [Has Children] John Sullivan b: ABT. 1775 in Berwick, ME
__________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
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Index | Add Post-em
* ID: I4945
* Name: Abigail COTTON
* Sex: F

Marriage 1 Ebenezer SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750
________________________________

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 128 page 171
[p.171] Mrs. Jennie Curran Everson.
DAR ID Number: 127517
Born in Providence, R. I.
Wife of Charles Grant Everson.
Descendant of Capt. Ebenezer Sullivan, as follows:
1. John C. Curran (1845-1910) m. 1867 Martha A. Rogers (b. 1852).
2. David Moore Rogers (1802-59) m. 2d 1845 Susanna Nickerson Jackson (1813-78).
3. Robert Rodgers (Rogers) (d. 1830) m. 1797 Margery Sullivan (b. 1774).
4. Ebenezer Sullivan m. 1773 Abigail Cotton.
Ebenezer Sullivan (1753-99) commanded a company in the Massachusetts troops. He was born in
Berwick, Maine; died in Charleston, S. C.

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 128 page 171
_______________________________________



Moses and Abigail had the following children:

+ 39 M v. John Sullivanwas born Abt 1775.




Sixth Generation

17. John Sullivan(John Sullivan, John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel).

Taken from ancestry.com on August 12, 2002 -

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume X
S
Sullivant, William Starling

SULLIVAN, Will Van Amberg, senator, was born near Winona, Miss., Dec. 18, 1857; son of Isaac and
Ruth (Clark) Sullivan; grandson of John Sullivan, and great-grandson of General Sullivan, who served
under General Greene in the Revolutionary war. He attended the University of Mississippi, 1873-74, and
was graduated from Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn., A.B., LL.B. 1875. He practised law at Austin,
Miss., and in 1877 removed to Oxford, Miss., where he was elected a member of the board of
aldermen, a delegate to the Democratic national convention in 1892; and a member of the Democratic
national executive committee in 1896. He was Democratic representative from the second Mississippi
district in the 55th congress, 1897-98, and upon the death of Senator E.C. Walthall was appointed U.S.
senator, May 30, 1898, and was elected by the legislature, January, 1900, U.S. senator, serving, 1898-
1901. He was married, Dec. 18, 1900, to Marie, daughter of Dr. Newman of Washington, D.C.
View full context
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on August 11, 2002 -

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Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
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* ID: I3303
* Name: John SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 17 FEB 1739 in New Hampshire 1
* Death: 23 JAN 1795 in Durham, New Hampshire 1
* Note: Governor of New Hampshire in 1786.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Lydia Remick WORSTER
* Married: 1760

Children
1. [Has No Children] Lydia SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Sources:
1. Abbrev: Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Note:
Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project
Page: db=swla2001
Quality: 1
_________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 15, 2002 -



The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume X
S
Sullivant, William Starling

SULLIVAN, Will Van Amberg, senator, was born near Winona, Miss., Dec. 18, 1857; son of Isaac and
Ruth (Clark) Sullivan; grandson of John Sullivan, and great-grandson of General Sullivan , who served
under General Greene in the Revolutionary war. He attended the University of Mississippi, 1873-74, and
was graduated from Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn., A.B., LL.B. 1875. He practised law at Austin,
Miss., and in 1877 removed to Oxford, Miss., where he was elected a member of the board of
aldermen, a delegate to the Democratic national convention in 1892; and a member of the Democratic
national executive committee in 1896. He was Democratic representative from the second Mississippi
district in the 55th congress, 1897-98, and upon the death of Senator E.C. Walthall was appointed U.S.
senator, May 30, 1898, and was elected by the legislature, January, 1900, U.S. senator, serving, 1898-
1901. He was married, Dec. 18, 1900, to Marie, daughter of Dr. Newman of Washington, D.C.
__________________________________________


John had the following children:

+ 40 M i. Isaac Sullivan.

21. Mary Sullivan(John Sullivan, John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born 1775.

Taken from ancestry.com on August 12, 2002 -

Brown Cheser
Entries: 894 Updated: Thu Jun 7 19:28:57 2001 Contact: Mindi Neuenwchwander <mneuen@abc-
networks.com>
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I889
* Name: Mary Sullivan
* Sex: F
* Birth: 1775

Father: General John Sullivan b: 17 Feb 1740 in Somersworth, New Hampshire
Mother: Lydia Worchester b: ? ??? ????
Marriage 1 Gideon Jr. Rowser b: 1770
* Married: 1795
Children
1. [Has Children] Lydia Rozwer Rouser Rowser b: 5 Feb 1802
__________________________________________


Mary married Gideon Rowser Junior1795.

Taken from ancestry.com on August 12, 2002 -

Brown Cheser
Entries: 894 Updated: Thu Jun 7 19:28:57 2001 Contact: Mindi Neuenwchwander <mneuen@abc-
networks.com>
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I889
* Name: Mary Sullivan
* Sex: F
* Birth: 1775

Father: General John Sullivan b: 17 Feb 1740 in Somersworth, New Hampshire
Mother: Lydia Worchester b: ? ??? ????

Marriage 1 Gideon Jr. Rowser b: 1770
* Married: 1795
Children
1. [Has Children] Lydia Rozwer Rouser Rowser b: 5 Feb 1802
__________________________________________


Gideon and Mary had the following children:

+ 41 F i. Lydia Rozwer or Rouser or Rowserwas born 5 Feb 1802.

22. James Sullivan(James Sullivan, John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) died 27 Aug 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and probated Jan
1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5), White Females (2)
, Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell <eehroots@nc.rr.com>
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* ID: I3302
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1

* Birth: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine 1
* Death: 10 DEC 1808 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
* Note: 6th Governor of Massachusettes in 1807.

Father: John Owen SULLIVAN b: 17 JUL 1690 in Limerick, Ireland
Mother: Margery BROWN b: 1714 in County Cork, Ireland
Marriage 1 Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Children
1. [Has Children] James SULLIVAN b: 1754
2. [Has No Children] William SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Richard SULLIVAN
5. [Has No Children] Bant SULLIVAN
6. [Has No Children] Nancy SULLIVAN
7. [Has No Children] Hettie SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] George SULLIVAN

Marriage 2 Martha LANGDON
Sources:
1. Abbrev: Ancestry.com World Tree
Note:
Ancestry.com World Tree
Page: db=gedoth
__________________________________


James married Mary Cox. Mary was born 14 Oct 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and probated Jan
1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5), White Females (2)
, Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North Carolina

5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


James and Mary had the following children:

42 M i. Samuel Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and
probated Jan 1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5),
White Females (2), Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


43 M ii. John Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN

* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and
probated Jan 1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5),
White Females (2), Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


44 M iii. James Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and
probated Jan 1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5),
White Females (2), Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN

3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


45 M iv. Owen Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and
probated Jan 1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5),
White Females (2), Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


+ 46 M v. Elijah Taylor Sullivanwas born 25 Dec 1791.

47 M vi. Ezekial Morris Sullivanwas born 25 Nov 1798 in Lincoln County, North Carolina.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

My Ancestors and Their Families
Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
<eehroots@nc.rr.com>

<eehroots@nc.rr.com>
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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and
probated Jan 1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5),
White Females (2), Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


48 F vii. Sarah Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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Entries: 7274 Updated: Mon Oct 8 22:03:10 2001 Contact: Eleanor Howell
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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and
probated Jan 1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5),
White Females (2), Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey

* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


49 F viii. Mary Sullivan.

Taken from ancestry.com on July 13, 2002 -

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* ID: I1763
* Name: James SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 1754
* Death: 27 AUG 1825 in Lincoln County, North Carolina
* Note:
Fought in Revolution Sgt. N.C. DAR Patriot Index p. 659 Will written 14 Jun 1825 and
probated Jan 1826. Lincoln Co Wills Book 1 p27
Listed in 1790 Lincoln County, North Carolina, Census: White Males 16+ (1), 16- (5),
White Females (2), Slaves (0)

Father: James SULLIVAN b: 22 APR 1744 in Berwick, York County, Maine
Mother: Mehitable (Hetty) ODIARNE b: 26 JUN 1748

Marriage 1 Mary COX b: 14 OCT 1761 in Monmouth, New Jersey
* Married: 1770

Children
1. [Has No Children] Samuel SULLIVAN
2. [Has No Children] John SULLIVAN
3. [Has No Children] James SULLIVAN
4. [Has No Children] Owen SULLIVAN
5. [Has Children] Elijah Taylor SULLIVAN b: 25 DEC 1791 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
6. [Has Children] Ezekiel Morris SULLIVAN b: 25 NOV 1798 in Lincoln County, North
Carolina
7. [Has No Children] Sarah SULLIVAN
8. [Has No Children] Mary SULLIVAN
____________________________________________


35. Parker Sullivan(Moses Ebenezer Sullivan, John Owen Sullyfun or Sullefund or Sullivan, Phillip, Owen, Daniel) was born 11 Apr 1782 in New Jersey. He died 22 Aug 1852 in Champaign, Ohio. He was buried
in New Jersey. He died 22 Aug 1852 in Champaign, Ohio. He was buried in Hewling Farm, Urbana, Ohio.

Timeline for Parker Sullivan

21 Sep 1781 - Mary Johns, Parker's wife, born in New Jersey?

11 April 1782 - Parker Sullivan born in Salem, New Jersey?

1 Sep 1802 - Parker Sullivan (age 20) married to Mary Johns (age 21) in Salem, New Jersey

23 Jun 1805 - Son Elias Sullivan, born to Parker Sullivan (age 23) and Mary Johns (age 22) in New
Jersey

Between 1805 and 1807 - Parker moved family to Champaign County, Ohio

??? - Son Joshu(a or s) Sullivan, born to Parker Sullivan and Mary Johns, in Champaign County, Ohio

15 Feb 1807 - Daughter Anna Sullivan born to Parker Sullivan (age 25) and Mary Johns, in Champaign
County, Ohio

29 Oct 1808 - Daughter Rebecca Sullivan born to Parker Sullivan (age 26) and Mary Johns, in
Champaign County, Ohio

21 Feb 1811 - Son Aaron Sullivan born to Parker Sullivan (age 29) and Mary Johns, in Champaign
County, Ohio

7 Sept 1811 - Parker Sullivan (age 29) purchases land/pays taxes on land in Champaign County, Ohio

1820 - Parker Sullivan (age 38) found on the Champaign County, Ohio Census

1820 - Daughter Elizabeth Sullivan born to Parker Sullivan (age 38) and Mary Johns, in Champaign
County, Ohio

25 Apr 1822 - Son George Sullivan born to Parker Sullivan (age 40) and Mary Johns, in Champaign
County, Ohio

January 03, 1831 - Parker Sullivan (age 50) purchased land in Ohio

1840 - Parker Sullivan (age 58) found on the Champaign County, Ohio Census

1850 - Parker Sullivan (age 68) found on the Harrison Township, Ohio Census

22 Aug 1852 - Parker Sullivan (age 70) died in Champaign County, Ohio. Buried in Sullivan Cemetery
Champaign Co Ohio.
________________________________________

Taken from http://www.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/ifa_image.cgi?IN=000697&...=
Early%20Ohio%20Settlers%3A%20Southwestern%20OH%2C%201800-1840&CD=651

Ohio, 1787-1840 Land and Tax Records
Early Ohio Settlers: Southwestern OH, 1800-1840, Surnames, S - T, Page 316

Purchaser - Parker Sullivan (c)
Year - 1811
Date - Sept 07
Residence - Champaign
R - 12
T - 04
S - 18

Purchaser - Parker Sullivan (c)
Year - 1829
Date - July 31

Residence - Champaign
R - 12
T - 04
S - 18

Purchaser - Samuel Sullivan (a)
Year - 1836
Date - Sept 23
Residence - Miami
R - 03
T - 12
S - 22
______________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 23, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, PARKER
Land Office: CINCINNATI Sequence #:
Document Number: 1542 Total Acres: 78.64
Misc. Doc. Nr.: Signature: Yes
Canceled Document: No Issue Date: January 03, 1831
Mineral Rights Reserved: Metes and Bounds: No
Survey Date: Statutory Reference: 3 Stat. 566
Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: April 24, 1820
Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries
________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 23, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, PARKER
State: OH Year: 1850
County: Champaign County Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
Township: Harrison Township Page: 329
Database: OH 1850 Federal Census Index
_________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 23, 2002 -

SULLIVAN, PARKER
State: OH Year: 1840
County: Champaign County Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
Township: Harrison Township Page: 317
Database: OH 1840 Federal Census Index
_____________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 23, 2002 -

Ohio Census, 1790-1890 [Print]
Viewing records 1-4 of 4 Matches

SULLIVAN, PARKER
State: OH Year: 1820
County: Champaign County Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
Township: Cancord Page: 500
Database: OH 1820 Federal Census Index
_________________________________

Taken from


Surnames: JOHNS, SULLIVAN
Researcher: Todd Yetter
Email: tyetter@cc.cumber.edu
Date posted: Thursday, January 27, 2000
Looking for Parker SULLIVAN family that settled in Champaign Co sometime in the early 1800's. Parker
married Mary JOHNS in 1804 in Salem, NJ. Parker and Mary had 8 children, the last 7 born in
Champaign Co. Any information on this family would be most appreciated. Will gladly share information.
_______________________________________

Taken from genealogy.com on July 7, 2002 -

Re: Parker Sullivan of New Jersey.
Posted by: Colleen Date: June 15, 2001 at 20:22:09
In Reply to: Re: Parker Sullivan of New Jersey. by Todd Yetter of 6219

I'm also researching this line. I descend through Parker Sullivan & Mary Johns ' son Joshua who
married Nancy Greathouse in Athens Co., Ohio, through their daughter Rachel Orinda who married
Cleon Keyes in Miami Co., Indiana. Does anyone have any more information on Parker & Mary and their
children?
______________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on June 11, 2002 --

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
Entries: 89632 Updated: Mon Jun 17 06:45:55 2002 Contact: Chas Alcock <alcock@cox-internet.
com>
The Pioneers of Imperial Calcasieu Parish and their descendants.
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Add Post-em
* ID: I00018
* Name: PARKER SULLIVAN
* Sex: M
* Birth: 11 APR 1782 in Salem County, New Jersey
* Death: 28 AUG 1852 in Champaign County, Ohio
* Occupation: Farmer
* Event: Buried at Buried in Sullivan Cemetery Champaign Co Ohio
* Note:
WFT Vol. 61, Ed. 1, Tree #2585

LeVerne Sullivan Jr. claims Parker Sullivan's wedding date is actually Sept. 1, 1804.
Parker and his wife probably went from New Jersey to Champaign County, Ohio, about 1807. According
to Henry Howe's "Historical Collections of Ohio" (1900), Volume 1 page 372, he was one of the first
settlers in the village of Urbana, Ohio. In 1850 at the age of 68 he was a farmer and the value of his
property, real estate was $4,000.

Sullivan Cemetery
The little private cemetery where Parker and Mary Johns Sullivan are buried is on the old Hewling
(Huling, Heuling) farm. This farm was divided to the Hewling children at the death of their parents, so
Mr. Fry, caretaker of several cemeteries told Miss Alice Longfellow, and she had him fence and clean it
and reset the stones which were all down. This Sullivan Cemetery is near the Wesley Methodist Chapel
Cemetery which is on land once owned by Elias Sullivan and given to them for that purpose. These
cemeteries are near Urbana and West Liberty, Ohio. Mr. George Sullivan, son of George, brother of
Elias cared for them at one time.

The cemetery is on top of a hill just west of the old home place about 100 feet south of the road. The
stones are laying on the ground. Both Mary and Parker have a tree craved on their stones. There were
three graves visible when I visited in 1998. There is a very old barn a couple of hundred feet south of
the cemetery. (Chas)


Father: EBENEZER SULLIVAN b: 30 OCT 1750 in Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.
Mother: MARY PARKER b: BET. 1735 - 1761

Marriage 1 MARY JOHNS b: 21 SEP 1781 in Salem, New Jersey

* Married: 1 SEP 1804 in Salem, New Jersey
* Married: 1 SEP 1802 in Salem Co., New Jersey, U.S.A.

Children

1. [Has No Children] Mary Elizabeth Sullivan b: BET. 1796 - 1818
2. [Has Children] Joshus Parker Sullivan b: BEF. 1805 in Champaign County, Ohio
3. [Has Children] Elias Sullivan b: 23 JUN 1805 in New Jersey
4. [Has Children] Anna "Polly" Sullivan b: 15 FEB 1807 in Champaign County, Ohio
5. [Has Children] Rebecca Sullivan b: 29 OCT 1808 in Ohio
6. [Has Children] AARON SULLIVAN b: 21 FEB 1811 in Champaign Co., Ohio, U.S.A.
7. [Has No Children] Dau Sullivan b: 1816
8. [Has Children] Elizabeth Sullivan b: 10 JAN 1820 in Champaign, County, Ohio
9. [Has Children] George Sullivan b: 25 APR 1822 in Champaign County, Ohio
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
sullivanangie 13 Aug 2002 4:32AM GMT 
dileeledger21 27 Jun 2001 9:59PM GMT 
sfertko 1 Jul 2001 11:16PM GMT 
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